Herd vs Flock what difference

what is difference between Herd and Flock

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /hɜːd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /hɝd/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)d
  • Homophone: heard

Etymology 1

From Middle English herde, heerde, heorde, from Old English hierd, heord (herd, flock; keeping, care, custody), from Proto-Germanic *herdō (herd), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerdʰ- (file, row, herd). Cognate with German Herde, Swedish hjord. Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian herdhe (nest) and Serbo-Croatian krdo.

Noun

herd (plural herds)

  1. A number of domestic animals assembled together under the watch or ownership of a keeper. [from 11th c.]
    • 1768, Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard,
      The lowing herd wind slowly o’er the lea.
  2. Any collection of animals gathered or travelling in a company. [from 13th c.]
    • 2007, J. Michael Fay, Ivory Wars: Last Stand in Zakouma, National Geographic (March 2007), 47,
      Zakouma is the last place on Earth where you can see more than a thousand elephants on the move in a single, compact herd.
  3. (now usually derogatory) A crowd, a mass of people; now usually pejorative: a rabble. [from 15th c.]
    • 1833, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Table Talk, 8 June 1833
      You can never interest the common herd in the abstract question.
Derived terms
  • herd immunity
  • herd instinct
Translations

Verb

herd (third-person singular simple present herds, present participle herding, simple past and past participle herded)

  1. (intransitive) To unite or associate in a herd; to feed or run together, or in company.
    Sheep herd on many hills.
  2. (transitive) To unite or associate in a herd
  3. (transitive) To manage, care for or guard a herd
  4. (intransitive) To associate; to ally oneself with, or place oneself among, a group or company.
    • I’ll herd among his friends, and seem
      One of the number.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English herde, from Old English hirde, hierde, from Proto-West Germanic *hirdī, from Proto-Germanic *hirdijaz. Cognate with German Hirte, Swedish herde, Danish hyrde.

Noun

herd (plural herds)

  1. (now rare) Someone who keeps a group of domestic animals; a herdsman.
    • 2000, Alasdair Grey, The Book of Prefaces, Bloomsbury 2002, page 38:
      Any talent which gives a good new thing to others is a miracle, but commentators have thought it extra miraculous that England’s first known poet was an illiterate herd.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

herd (third-person singular simple present herds, present participle herding, simple past and past participle herded)

  1. (intransitive, Scotland) To act as a herdsman or a shepherd.
  2. (transitive) To form or put into a herd.
  3. (transitive) To move or drive a herd.
Translations

See also

  • Appendix:English collective nouns
  • drove
  • gather
  • muster
  • round up
  • ride herd on

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

herd

  1. imperative of herde

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *herþ.

Noun

herd m

  1. hearth

Descendants

  • Middle High German: hert
    • German: Herd
    • Luxembourgish: Häerd


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /flɒk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /flɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒk

Etymology 1

From Middle English flock (flock), from Old English flocc (flock, company, troop), from Proto-Germanic *flukkaz, *flakka- (crowd, troop). Cognate with Middle Low German vlocke (crowd, flock), Old Norse flokkr (crowd, troop, band, flock). Perhaps related to Old English folc (crowd, troop, band). More at folk.

Noun

flock (plural flocks)

  1. A number of birds together in a group, such as those gathered together for the purpose of migration.
  2. A large number of animals associated together in a group; commonly used of various farmed animals, such as sheep and goats, but applied to a wide variety of animals.
  3. Those served by a particular pastor or shepherd.
  4. A large number of people.
    Synonym: congregation
  5. (Christianity) A religious congregation.
    Synonym: congregation
Synonyms

(large number of people):

  • bunch, gaggle, horde, host, legion, litter, nest, rabble, swarm, throng, wake
Translations

Verb

flock (third-person singular simple present flocks, present participle flocking, simple past and past participle flocked)

  1. (intransitive) To congregate in or head towards a place in large numbers.
    People flocked to the cinema to see the new film.
    • What place the gods for our repose assigned.
      Friends daily flock; and scarce the kindly spring
      Began to clothe the ground
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To flock to; to crowd.
    • 1609, Taylor
      Good fellows, trooping, flocked me so.
  3. To treat a pool with chemicals to remove suspended particles.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English flok (tuft of wool), from Old French floc (tuft of wool), from Late Latin floccus (tuft of wool), probably from Frankish *flokko (down, wool, flock), from Proto-Germanic *flukkōn-, *flukkan-, *fluksōn- (down, flock), from Proto-Indo-European *plewk- (hair, fibres, tuft). Cognate with Old High German flocko (down), Middle Dutch vlocke (flock), Norwegian dialectal flugsa (snowflake). Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian flokë (hair).

Noun

flock (countable and uncountable, plural flocks)

  1. Coarse tufts of wool or cotton used in bedding.
  2. A lock of wool or hair.
  3. Very fine sifted woollen refuse, especially that from shearing the nap of cloths, formerly used as a coating for wallpaper to give it a velvety or clothlike appearance; also, the dust of vegetable fibre used for a similar purpose.
    • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
Translations

Verb

flock (third-person singular simple present flocks, present participle flocking, simple past and past participle flocked)

  1. (transitive) To coat a surface with dense fibers or particles; especially, to create a dense arrangement of fibers with a desired nap.
Translations

Derived terms

  • flocked

See also

  • Appendix:English collective nouns

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish flokker, flukker, from Old Norse flokkr, from Proto-Germanic *flukkaz. Cognate with Faroese flokkur, Icelandic flokkur, Norwegian flokk, and Danish flok.

Pronunciation

Noun

flock c

  1. flock; a group of people or animals
  2. murder of crows

Declension

Related terms

  • flockas

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