here vs hither what difference

what is difference between here and hither

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /hɪə(ɹ)/, /hɪː(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /hɪɚ/, /hɪɹ/
  • (Scotland) IPA(key): /hiːɹ/
  • (Wales) IPA(key): /hjɜː/
  • (Maine) IPA(key): /ˈhi.ə/
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(ɹ)
  • Homophones: hear, hir

Etymology

From Middle English her, from Old English hēr (at this place), from Proto-West Germanic *hēr, from Proto-Germanic *hē₂r, from *hiz +‎ *-r, from Proto-Indo-European *kís, from *ḱe + *ís.

Adverb

here (not comparable)

  1. (location) In, on, or at this place.
    Synonym: (emphatic) right here
    • 1849, Alfred Tennyson, In Memoriam A. H. H., VII,
      Dark house, by which once more I stand / Here in the long unlovely street,
    • 2008, Omar Khadr, Affidavit of Omar Ahmed Khadr,
      The Canadian visitor stated, “I’m not here to help you. I’m not here to do anything for you. I’m just here to get information.”
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Oh, yes. I am here! — Good. You are there.

  2. (location) To this place; used in place of the more dated hither.
    • 1891, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Yellow Wall-Paper,
      He said we came here solely on my account, that I was to have perfect rest and all the air I could get.
  3. (abstract) In this context.
    • 1872 May, Edward Burnett Tylor, Quetelet on the Science of Man, published in Popular Science Monthly, Volume 1,
      The two great generalizations which the veteran Belgian astronomer has brought to bear on physiological and mental science, and which it is proposed to describe popularly here, may be briefly defined:
    • 1904 January 15, William James, The Chicago School, published in Psychological Bulletin, 1.1, pages 1-5,
      The briefest characterization is all that will be attempted here.
  4. At this point in the argument, narration, or other, usually written, work.
    • 1796, George Washington, Washington’s Farewell Address,
      Here, perhaps I ought to stop.

Derived terms

Translations

See here/translations § Adverb.

Noun

here (uncountable)

  1. (abstract) This place; this location.
  2. (abstract) This time, the present situation. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Quotations

Translations

See here/translations § Noun.

Adjective

here (not comparable)

  1. Filler after a noun or demonstrative pronoun, solely for emphasis.
    John here is a rascal.
  2. Filler after a demonstrative pronoun but before the noun it modifies, solely for emphasis.
    This here orange is too sour.

Interjection

here

  1. (slang) Used semi-assertively to offer something to the listener.
    Here, now I’m giving it to you.
  2. (Ireland, Britain, slang) Used for emphasis at the beginning of a sentence when expressing an opinion or want.
    Here, I’m tired and I want a drink.

Translations

See here/translations § Adjective.

See also

  • hence
  • here-
  • hereabouts
  • hither
  • there

Anagrams

  • HREE, Rehe, Rhee, heer

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • Here

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɦeː.rə/
  • Rhymes: -eːrə
  • Hyphenation: he‧re

Noun

here m (plural heren, diminutive heertje n)

  1. (archaic) inflected form of heer (lord)

Anagrams

  • heer

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhɛrɛ]
  • Hyphenation: he‧re
  • Rhymes: -rɛ

Etymology 1

From Proto-Uralic *kojera (male animal). Cognates include Mansi χār (χār).

Noun

here (plural herék)

  1. (anatomy) testicle, testis (the male sex and endocrine gland)
  2. drone (a male bee or wasp, which does not work but can fertilize the queen bee)
  3. (derogatory) loafer, drone (someone who doesn’t work; a lazy person, an idler)
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Shortened from lóhere (clover), from (horse) + here (testicle) (based on the shape of the leaves of this plant resembling horses’ sex glands), hence related to the above sense.

Noun

here (plural herék)

  1. (folksy) clover (a plant of the genus Trifolium with leaves usually divided into three (rarely four) leaflets and with white or red flowers)
Declension
Derived terms

References

Further reading

  • (testicle): here in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (drone): here in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (clover): here in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Latin

Etymology 1

Proto-Indo-European *dʰǵʰyes- (yesterday)

Alternative forms

  • heri

Adverb

here (not comparable)

  1. yesterday

Etymology 2

Verb

hērē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of hēreō

References

  • here in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • here in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch hēro, hērro.

Noun

hêre m

  1. lord, high-ranked person
  2. God, the Lord
  3. ruler
  4. leader
  5. gentleman (respectful title for a male)
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants
  • Dutch: heer
    • Afrikaans: heer
  • Limburgish: hieër

Etymology 2

From Old Dutch *heri, from Proto-Germanic *harjaz.

Noun

hēre n

  1. army, band of troops
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants
  • Dutch: heer

Further reading

  • “here (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “here (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “here (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “here (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English here, from Proto-West Germanic *hari, from Proto-Germanic *harjaz (army; commander).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛːr(ə)/

Noun

here

  1. a military force; a troop, host, or army
  2. a group of people; a team, band, throng, or mass
  3. any group or set of things or creatures
  4. fighting, battle; conflict between armed forces
  5. (rare) participation in the armed forces
Alternative forms
  • her, heir, herre, ere, har, hare, hyre
  • hære, heare, heore, hir, hire (early)
Related terms
  • herberwe
Descendants
  • English: here
  • Scots: here, heir, heyr

References

  • “hēre, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

From Old English heora, hira, genitive of hīe (they).

Determiner

here

  1. their
Alternative forms
  • her, heare, heir, er, ere, herre, hero, hir, hire, ire
  • har, hare, ar, are, ȝare (Kentish)
  • hur, hure, hura, huere, hurre (Southern, Southwest Midland)
  • hor, hore, or, ore, hora, heor, heore, heora, heoræ, hoere, har, hare, ar, are, ȝare (West Midland)
  • hor, hore, or, ore, hora, heor, heore, heora, heoræ, hoere (early)
Related terms
  • he (they)
Derived terms
  • heres
Descendants
  • English: her (obsolete)
  • Yola: aar
See also
References
  • “hē̆r(e, pron.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 3

From Old English hēore, hȳre (pleasant), from Proto-Germanic *hiurijaz (familiar; mild).

Adjective

here

  1. pleasant, gentle
  2. noble, excellent
Alternative forms
  • her, hær, harey
Descendants
  • English: here

References

  • “hẹ̄r(e, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 4

From Old English hǣre, hēre and Old French haire, itself from Germanic.

Noun

here (plural heres or heren or here)

  1. haircloth
Alternative forms
  • her, heare, eare, hair, haire, haigre, hare, heir, heire, heiȝre, hayr, hayre, hayer, heyr, heyre
Descendants
  • English: haire
  • Scots: heir

References

  • “hẹ̄r(e, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 5

Noun

here (plural heren)

  1. Alternative form of herre (lord)

Etymology 6

Noun

here (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of hire (wages)

Etymology 7

Noun

here (plural heres)

  1. Alternative form of hare (hare)

Etymology 8

Determiner

here

  1. Alternative form of hire (her)

Pronoun

here

  1. Alternative form of hire (hers)

Etymology 9

Determiner

here

  1. Alternative form of hire (her)

Etymology 10

Adverb

here

  1. Alternative form of her (here)

Etymology 11

Noun

here (plural heres)

  1. Alternative form of heir (heir)

Etymology 12

Noun

here (plural heres)

  1. Alternative form of yeer (year)

Etymology 13

Adjective

here

  1. comparative degree of he (high)

Etymology 14

Verb

here

  1. Alternative form of heren (to hear)

Etymology 15

Verb

here

  1. Alternative form of hiren (to hire)

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *hari, from Proto-Germanic *harjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ker-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxe.re/, [ˈhe.re]

Noun

here m (nominative plural herġas)

  1. an army (especially of the enemy)

Declension

Derived terms

  • heregrīma
  • heretoga
  • stælhere (marauding band or army)

Coordinate terms

  • fierd

Descendants

  • Middle English: here
    • English: here
    • Scots: here, heir, heyr

Saterland Frisian

Alternative forms

  • heere

Etymology

From Old Frisian hēra, from Proto-West Germanic *hauʀijan. Cognates include West Frisian hearre and German horen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈheːrə/
  • Hyphenation: he‧re

Verb

here

  1. (transitive) to hear
  2. (intransitive) to obey
  3. (intransitive) to belong to

Conjugation

References

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “here”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN


English

Etymology

From Old English hider, from Proto-Germanic *hidrê. Cognate with Latin citer.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhɪðə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhɪðɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪðə(r)

Adverb

hither (not comparable)

  1. (literary or archaic) To this place, to here.
  2. over here

Usage notes

  • Compare to the pronominal adverb “hereto” which follows the pattern of “preposition + what” or “preposition + which”.

Antonyms

  • hence

Derived terms

Related terms

  • thither
  • whither
  • hither and thither

Translations

Adjective

hither (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) On this side; the nearer.
    Synonym: (literary) citerior
    • 1954, The essential Not-self could be perceived very clearly in things and in living creatures on the hither side of good and evil. — Aldous Huxley, The Doors of Perception (Chatto & Windus 1954, p. 30)

Derived terms

  • Hither Green

Translations

See also

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