Hero vs Heroine what difference

what is difference between Hero and Heroine

English

Etymology

From Middle English heroes, from Old French heroes, from Latin hērōs (hero), from Ancient Greek ἥρως (hḗrōs, demi-god, hero), from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (to watch over, protect). Related to Latin servo (protect). Displaced Middle English heleð, haleð, from Old English hæleþ.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈhɪɹoʊ/, /ˈhiɹoʊ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhɪəɹəʊ/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /ˈhɛəɹoʊ/
  • Hyphenation: he‧ro
  • Rhymes: -ɪəɹəʊ

Noun

hero (plural heroes, feminine heroine)

  1. Somebody who possesses great bravery and carries out extraordinary or noble deeds.
  2. A role model.
  3. The protagonist in a work of fiction.
  4. (poker) The current player, especially an hypothetical player for example and didactic purposes. Compare: villain (any opponent player). Not to be confused with hero call (a weak call against a supposed bluff).
    Let’s discuss how to play if the hero has KK, and there’s an ace on board.
  5. (US) A large sandwich made from meats and cheeses; a hero sandwich.
  6. (food styling, chiefly attributive) The product chosen from several candidates to be photographed.
    • 2003, Solomon H. Katz, William Woys Weaver, Encyclopedia of Food and Culture
      The preparation of the hero food involves any number of specialized techniques food stylists have developed to deal with the demands of photographing food.
    • 2008, Linda Bellingham, Jean Ann Bybee, Brad G. Rogers, Food Styling for Photographers (page 8)
      Protect the hero food. Whether the hero items are on a table in the studio or in the refrigerator, freezer, etc., be sure they are identified as hero items and not for consumption.
    • 2008, David Random, Defying Gravity (page 24)
      The food stylists this day had spent inordinate amounts of time preparing the hero product for a close-up scene.
  7. (web design) The eye-catching top portion of a web page, sometimes including a hero image; the portion above the fold.

Synonyms

  • see Thesaurus:hero
  • (sandwich): see sub

Derived terms

Related terms

  • heroine (hero (female))

See also

  • kamikaze
  • martyr
  • shaheed

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Rohe, heor, hoer, rheo-, rohe

Cebuano

Etymology

From English hero, from Old French heroes, from Latin hērōs (hero), from Ancient Greek ἥρως (hḗrōs, demi-god, hero), from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (to watch over, protect).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: he‧ro

Noun

hero

  1. a hero

German

Adverb

hero

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of her

Further reading

  • “hero” in Deutsches Wörterbuch von Jacob und Wilhelm Grimm, 16 vols., Leipzig 1854–1961.

Luo

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

Verb

hero

  1. to love

Middle English

Determiner

hero

  1. Alternative form of here (their)


English

Etymology

Via Latin herōīna from late Ancient Greek ἡρωΐνη (hērōḯnē) (2nd century), a feminine equivalent of ἥρως (hḗrōs, hero, demigod), equivalent to hero +‎ -ine.

  • English from 1650. The sense of “female lead character” is from 1715.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛɹoʊɪn/, /ˈhɪɹoʊɪn/
  • Homophone: heroin

Noun

heroine (plural heroines, masculine hero)

  1. A female hero.
  2. A female lead character.

Usage notes

  • In sense 1, hero, the masculine of heroine, is sometimes used, though it is still acceptable to use the feminine.
She is an American hero (or heroine).
  • Like feminine nouns formed with the suffix -ess, heroine refers only to females, whereas hero can refer to both males and females.
Who is your favorite hero? (answer can refer to either sex)
Who is your favorite heroine? (answer can refer only to females)

Synonyms

  • shero
  • hera (uncommon)

Derived terms

  • antiheroine
  • heroinic
  • heroinism
  • superheroine

Translations


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