hide vs skin what difference

what is difference between hide and skin

English

Alternative forms

  • hyde (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hīd, IPA(key): /haɪd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪd

Etymology 1

From Middle English hiden, huden, from Old English hȳdan (to hide, conceal, preserve), from Proto-West Germanic *hūdijan (to conceal), from Proto-Germanic *hūdijaną (to conceal), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewdʰ- (to cover, wrap, encase), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewH- (to cover).

The verb was originally weak. In the King James Version of the Bible (1611) both hid and hidden are used for the past participle.

Verb

hide (third-person singular simple present hides, present participle hiding, simple past hid, past participle hidden or (archaic) hid)

  1. (transitive) To put (something) in a place where it will be harder to discover or out of sight.
    Synonyms: conceal, hide away, secrete
    Antonyms: disclose, expose, reveal, show, uncover
    • 1856, Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part III Chapter XI, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
      The blind man, whom he had not been able to cure with the pomade, had gone back to the hill of Bois-Guillaume, where he told the travellers of the vain attempt of the druggist, to such an extent, that Homais when he went to town hid himself behind the curtains of the “Hirondelle” to avoid meeting him.
  2. (intransitive) To put oneself in a place where one will be harder to find or out of sight.
    Synonyms: go undercover, hide away, hide out, lie low, hole up
    Antonyms: reveal, show
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English hȳd, of Germanic origin, from Proto-West Germanic *hūdi, from Proto-Germanic *hūdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kew-t- (skin, hide), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewH- (to cover). More at sky.

Noun

hide (plural hides)

  1. (countable) The skin of an animal.
    Synonyms: pelt, skin
  2. (obsolete or derogatory) The human skin.
  3. (uncountable, informal, usually US) One’s own life or personal safety, especially when in peril.
    • 1957, Ayn Rand, Francisco d’Anconia’s speech in Atlas Shrugged:
      The rotter who simpers that he sees no difference between the power of money and the power of the whip, ought to learn the difference on his own hide—as I think he will.
  4. (countable) (mainly British) A covered structure from which hunters, birdwatchers, etc can observe animals without scaring them.
  5. (countable, architecture) A secret room for hiding oneself or valuables; a hideaway.
  6. (countable) A covered structure to which a pet animal can retreat, as is recommended for snakes.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

hide (third-person singular simple present hides, present participle hiding, simple past and past participle hided)

  1. To beat with a whip made from hide.
    • 1891, Robert Weir, J. Moray Brown, Riding
      He ran last week, and he was hided, and he was out on the day before yesterday, and here he is once more, and he knows he’s got to run and to be hided again.

Etymology 3

From Middle English hide, from Old English hīd, hȳd, hīġed, hīġid (a measure of land), for earlier *hīwid (the amount of land needed to support one family), a derivative of Proto-Germanic *hīwaz, *hīwō (relative, fellow-lodger, family), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱey- (to lie with, store, be familiar). Related to Old English hīwisc (hide of land, household), Old English hīwan (members of a family, household). More at hewe, hind.

Noun

hide (plural hides)

  1. (historical) A unit of land and tax assessment of varying size, originally as intended to support one household with dependents. [from 9th c.]
    • 2016, Peter H. Wilson, The Holy Roman Empire, Penguin 2017, p. 488:
      The exact size of hides varied with soil quality, but each one generally encompassed 24 to 26 hectares.
    Synonym: carucate
Usage notes

The hide was originally intended to represent the amount of land farmed by a single household but was primarily connected to obligations owed (in England) to the Saxon and Norman kings, and thus varied greatly from place to place. Around the time of the Domesday Book under the Normans, the hide was usually but not always the land expected to produce £1 (1 Tower pound of sterling silver) in income over the year.

Hypernyms
  • (100 hides) barony
Hyponyms
  • (14 hide) See virgate
  • (18 hide) See oxgang
  • (116 hide) nook
  • farundel

Anagrams

  • Heid, Ihde, hied

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • ide

Etymology

From Turkish iğde (oleaster).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhidɛ/

Noun

hide f (indefinite plural hide, definite singular hidja, definite plural hidet)

  1. (botany) jujube (Ziziphus jujuba)

Synonyms

  • xinxife

References


Middle English

Etymology 1

from Old English hīd, hȳd, hīġed, hīġid (a measure of land), from earlier *hīwid (the amount of land needed to support one family), a derivative of Proto-Germanic *hīwaz, *hīwō (relative, fellow-lodger, family), related to *hīwô (household).

Noun

hide (plural hides or hiden or hide)

  1. hide (unit of land)
Alternative forms
  • hyde
Descendants
  • English: hide
  • Scots: hyd, hid

References

  • “hīde, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

From hiden (to hide).

Noun

hide

  1. concealment
  2. hiding spot
Alternative forms
  • hid, hyd, hyde
Descendants
  • English: hide
  • Scots: hide

References

  • “hīd(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 3

Noun

hide (plural hides or hiden)

  1. Alternative form of hyde (skin)

Etymology 4

Noun

hide

  1. Alternative form of hythe (landing place, port)

Etymology 5

Noun

hide (plural hides)

  1. Alternative form of heed (head)

Etymology 6

Verb

hide (third-person singular simple present hideth, present participle hidende, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle hidde)

  1. Alternative form of hiden (to hide)


English

Etymology

From Middle English skyn, skinn, from Old English scinn, from Old Norse skinn (animal hide), from Proto-Germanic *skinþą (compare Dutch schinde (bark), dialectal German Schinde (fruit peel)), from Proto-Indo-European *sken- (to split off) (compare Breton skant (scales), Old Irish ceinn, Irish scainim (I tear, burst), Latin scindere (to split, divide), Sanskrit छिनत्ति (chinátti, he splits)), nasal variant of *skeh₁i-d- (to cut). Partially displaced native Old English hȳd (skin, hide), see hide. More at shed.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: skĭn, IPA(key): /skɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Noun

skin (countable and uncountable, plural skins)

  1. (uncountable) The outer protective layer of the body of any animal, including of a human.
  2. (uncountable) The outer protective layer of the fruit of a plant.
  3. (countable) The skin and fur of an individual animal used by humans for clothing, upholstery, etc.
  4. (countable) A congealed layer on the surface of a liquid.
  5. (countable, computing, graphical user interface) A set of resources that modifies the appearance and/or layout of the graphical user interface of a computer program.
  6. (countable, video games) An alternate appearance (texture map or geometry) for a character model in a video game.
  7. (countable, slang) Rolling paper for cigarettes.
  8. (countable, slang) Clipping of skinhead.
  9. (Australia) A subgroup of Australian aboriginal people; such divisions are cultural and not related to an individual′s physical skin.
    • 1984, Maxwell John Charlesworth, ‎Howard Morphy, ‎Diane Bell, Religion in Aboriginal Australia: An Anthology (page 361)
      The younger brother questions the correctness of the pursuit of the girls. “They may be of the wrong subsection,” he suggests. “We can take wrong skins,” says the older brother, but the younger still holds back.
  10. (slang) Bare flesh, particularly bare breasts.
  11. A vessel made of skin, used for holding liquids.
    • 1843, Richard Henry Horne, Orion
      the Bacchic train,
      Who brought their skins of wine, and loaded poles
      That bent with mighty clusters of black grapes
  12. (nautical) That part of a sail, when furled, which remains on the outside and covers the whole.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  13. (nautical) The covering, as of planking or iron plates, outside the framing, forming the sides and bottom of a vessel; the shell; also, a lining inside the framing.
  14. A drink of whisky served hot.
  15. (slang, Ireland, Britain) person, chap
    He was a decent old skin.

Synonyms

  • (outer covering of living tissue): dermis, integument, tegument
  • (outer protective layer of a plant or animal): peel (of fruit or vegetable), pericarp
  • (skin of an animal used by humans): hide, pelt
  • (congealed layer on the surface of a liquid): film
  • (subgroup of Australian Aboriginals): moiety, section, subsection

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • cutaneous
  • cutis
  • dermis
  • epidermis

References

  • skin on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

skin (third-person singular simple present skins, present participle skinning, simple past and past participle skinned)

  1. (transitive) To injure the skin of.
    He fell off his bike and skinned his knee on the concrete.
  2. (transitive) To remove the skin and/or fur of an animal or a human.
  3. (colloquial) To high five.
  4. (transitive, computing, colloquial) To apply a skin to (a computer program).
    Can I skin the application to put the picture of my cat on it?
  5. (Britain, soccer, transitive) To use tricks to go past a defender.
  6. (intransitive) To become covered with skin.
    A wound eventually skins over.
  7. (transitive) To cover with skin, or as if with skin; hence, to cover superficially.
  8. (US, slang, archaic) To produce, in recitation, examination, etc., the work of another for one’s own, or to use cribs, memoranda, etc., which are prohibited.
  9. (slang, dated) To strip of money or property; to cheat.

Synonyms

  • (injure the skin of): bark, chafe, excoriate, graze, scrape
  • (remove the skin of): flay, fleece, flense, scalp

Derived terms

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • -kins, Sink, inks, k’ins, kins, sink

Abinomn

Noun

skin

  1. star

Cimbrian

Etymology

From Norwegian ski +‎ -an (infinitive suffix).

Verb

skin

  1. (Luserna) to ski

Noun

skin n

  1. (Luserna) skiing

References

  • “skin” in Cimbrian, Ladin, Mòcheno: Getting to know 3 peoples. 2015. Servizio minoranze linguistiche locali della Provincia autonoma di Trento, Trento, Italy.

Danish

Noun

skin n (singular definite skinnet, not used in plural form)

  1. light, glare
  2. semblance

Verb

skin

  1. imperative of skinne

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

skin m or f (plural skins, diminutive skinnetje n)

  1. (computing) Skin
  2. Short for skinhead.

Anagrams

  • niks, snik

Icelandic

Etymology

From skína (to shine).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /scɪːn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪːn
    Homophone: skyn

Noun

skin n (genitive singular skins, nominative plural skin)

  1. shine, shimmer, brightness

Declension

Derived terms

  • sólskin

Anagrams

  • sink

Middle English

Noun

skin

  1. Alternative form of skyn

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

skin

  1. inflection of skina:
    1. present
    2. imperative

Old Saxon

Etymology

From skīnan.

Noun

skīn n

  1. shine

Portuguese

Noun

skin f (plural skins)

  1. (computing) skin (image used as the background of a graphical user interface)
  2. (countable, video games) skin (alternate appearance (texture map or geometry) for a 3D character model in a video game)

Swedish

Verb

skin

  1. imperative of skina.

Tok Pisin

Etymology

English skin

Noun

skin

  1. (anatomy) skin

Derived terms

  • skin pas (envelope)

Volapük

Noun

skin (nominative plural skins)

  1. skin

Declension

Derived terms


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