hide vs veil what difference

what is difference between hide and veil

English

Alternative forms

  • hyde (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hīd, IPA(key): /haɪd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪd

Etymology 1

From Middle English hiden, huden, from Old English hȳdan (to hide, conceal, preserve), from Proto-West Germanic *hūdijan (to conceal), from Proto-Germanic *hūdijaną (to conceal), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewdʰ- (to cover, wrap, encase), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewH- (to cover).

The verb was originally weak. In the King James Version of the Bible (1611) both hid and hidden are used for the past participle.

Verb

hide (third-person singular simple present hides, present participle hiding, simple past hid, past participle hidden or (archaic) hid)

  1. (transitive) To put (something) in a place where it will be harder to discover or out of sight.
    Synonyms: conceal, hide away, secrete
    Antonyms: disclose, expose, reveal, show, uncover
    • 1856, Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part III Chapter XI, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
      The blind man, whom he had not been able to cure with the pomade, had gone back to the hill of Bois-Guillaume, where he told the travellers of the vain attempt of the druggist, to such an extent, that Homais when he went to town hid himself behind the curtains of the “Hirondelle” to avoid meeting him.
  2. (intransitive) To put oneself in a place where one will be harder to find or out of sight.
    Synonyms: go undercover, hide away, hide out, lie low, hole up
    Antonyms: reveal, show
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English hȳd, of Germanic origin, from Proto-West Germanic *hūdi, from Proto-Germanic *hūdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kew-t- (skin, hide), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewH- (to cover). More at sky.

Noun

hide (plural hides)

  1. (countable) The skin of an animal.
    Synonyms: pelt, skin
  2. (obsolete or derogatory) The human skin.
  3. (uncountable, informal, usually US) One’s own life or personal safety, especially when in peril.
    • 1957, Ayn Rand, Francisco d’Anconia’s speech in Atlas Shrugged:
      The rotter who simpers that he sees no difference between the power of money and the power of the whip, ought to learn the difference on his own hide—as I think he will.
  4. (countable) (mainly British) A covered structure from which hunters, birdwatchers, etc can observe animals without scaring them.
  5. (countable, architecture) A secret room for hiding oneself or valuables; a hideaway.
  6. (countable) A covered structure to which a pet animal can retreat, as is recommended for snakes.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

hide (third-person singular simple present hides, present participle hiding, simple past and past participle hided)

  1. To beat with a whip made from hide.
    • 1891, Robert Weir, J. Moray Brown, Riding
      He ran last week, and he was hided, and he was out on the day before yesterday, and here he is once more, and he knows he’s got to run and to be hided again.

Etymology 3

From Middle English hide, from Old English hīd, hȳd, hīġed, hīġid (a measure of land), for earlier *hīwid (the amount of land needed to support one family), a derivative of Proto-Germanic *hīwaz, *hīwō (relative, fellow-lodger, family), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱey- (to lie with, store, be familiar). Related to Old English hīwisc (hide of land, household), Old English hīwan (members of a family, household). More at hewe, hind.

Noun

hide (plural hides)

  1. (historical) A unit of land and tax assessment of varying size, originally as intended to support one household with dependents. [from 9th c.]
    • 2016, Peter H. Wilson, The Holy Roman Empire, Penguin 2017, p. 488:
      The exact size of hides varied with soil quality, but each one generally encompassed 24 to 26 hectares.
    Synonym: carucate
Usage notes

The hide was originally intended to represent the amount of land farmed by a single household but was primarily connected to obligations owed (in England) to the Saxon and Norman kings, and thus varied greatly from place to place. Around the time of the Domesday Book under the Normans, the hide was usually but not always the land expected to produce £1 (1 Tower pound of sterling silver) in income over the year.

Hypernyms
  • (100 hides) barony
Hyponyms
  • (14 hide) See virgate
  • (18 hide) See oxgang
  • (116 hide) nook
  • farundel

Anagrams

  • Heid, Ihde, hied

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • ide

Etymology

From Turkish iğde (oleaster).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhidɛ/

Noun

hide f (indefinite plural hide, definite singular hidja, definite plural hidet)

  1. (botany) jujube (Ziziphus jujuba)

Synonyms

  • xinxife

References


Middle English

Etymology 1

from Old English hīd, hȳd, hīġed, hīġid (a measure of land), from earlier *hīwid (the amount of land needed to support one family), a derivative of Proto-Germanic *hīwaz, *hīwō (relative, fellow-lodger, family), related to *hīwô (household).

Noun

hide (plural hides or hiden or hide)

  1. hide (unit of land)
Alternative forms
  • hyde
Descendants
  • English: hide
  • Scots: hyd, hid

References

  • “hīde, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

From hiden (to hide).

Noun

hide

  1. concealment
  2. hiding spot
Alternative forms
  • hid, hyd, hyde
Descendants
  • English: hide
  • Scots: hide

References

  • “hīd(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 3

Noun

hide (plural hides or hiden)

  1. Alternative form of hyde (skin)

Etymology 4

Noun

hide

  1. Alternative form of hythe (landing place, port)

Etymology 5

Noun

hide (plural hides)

  1. Alternative form of heed (head)

Etymology 6

Verb

hide (third-person singular simple present hideth, present participle hidende, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle hidde)

  1. Alternative form of hiden (to hide)


English

Etymology

From Middle English veil, veyl, from Anglo-Norman and Old Northern French veil (sail, veil, shroud) (Francien Old French voil, French voile), Latin vēlum (sail). Displaced Middle English scleire, scleyre, sleyre, slyre (veil) (compare German Schleier). Doublet of velum and voile.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /veɪl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophones: vale, vail

Noun

veil (plural veils)

  1. Something hung up or spread out to hide or protect the face, or hide an object from view; usually of gauze, crepe, or similar diaphanous material.
    • The veil of the temple was rent in twain.
  2. (figuratively) Anything that partially obscures a clear view.
  3. A cover; disguise; a mask; a pretense.
    • 2007. Zerzan, John. Silence. p. 4.
      Beckett complains that “in the forest of symbols” there is never quiet, and longs to break through the veil of language to silence.
  4. A covering for a person or thing; as, a caul (especially over the head)
  5. (biology) The calyptra of mosses.
  6. (zoology) velum (A circular membrane round the cap of a medusa).
  7. (mycology) A thin layer of tissue which is attached to or covers a mushroom.
  8. (mycology) A membrane connecting the margin of the pileus of a mushroom with the stalk; a velum.
  9. An obscuration of the clearness of the tones in pronunciation.
  10. (figuratively, parapsychology) That which separates the living and the spirit world.

Derived terms

  • dance of the seven veils
  • draw a veil over
  • take the veil
  • veil of tears

Descendants

  • Japanese: ベール (bēru)
  • Korean: 베일 (beil)

Translations

Verb

veil (third-person singular simple present veils, present participle veiling, simple past and past participle veiled)

  1. (transitive) To dress in, or decorate with, a veil.
  2. (transitive) To conceal as with a veil.
    The forest fire was veiled by smoke, but I could hear it clearly.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Levi, Viel, evil, live, vile, vlei

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

veil

  1. first-person singular present indicative of veilen
  2. imperative of veilen

Adjective

veil (comparative veiler, superlative veilst)

  1. venal

Inflection

Anagrams

  • viel, vlei

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