high vs low what difference

what is difference between high and low

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /ˈhaɪ/, [haɪ̯]
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhaɪ/, [haɪ̯]
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Homophones: hi, Hi, hie

Etymology 1

From Middle English high, heigh, heih, from Old English hēah (high, tall, lofty, high-class, exalted, sublime, illustrious, important, proud, haughty, deep, right), from Proto-West Germanic *hauh (high), from Proto-Germanic *hauhaz (high), from Proto-Indo-European *kewk- (to elevate, height).

Cognate with Scots heich (high), Saterland Frisian hooch (high), West Frisian heech (high), Dutch hoog (high), Low German hoog (high), German hoch (high), Swedish hög (high), Norwegian høy (high), Icelandic hár (high), Lithuanian kaukas (bump, boil, sore), Russian ку́ча (kúča, pile, heap, stack, lump).

Alternative forms

  • hi (informal)

Adjective

high (comparative higher, superlative highest)

  1. Physically elevated, extending above a base or average level:
    1. Very elevated; extending or being far above a base; tall; lofty.
    2. Relatively elevated; rising or raised above the average or normal level from which elevation is measured.
      • 1919, Martha Van Rensselaer, Flora Rose, Helen Canon, A Manual of Home-Making, page 376:
        A nightgown with a high neck and long sleeves may have the fullness set into a yoke.
    3. (baseball, of a ball) Above the batter’s shoulders.
      the pitch (or: the ball) was high
    4. Pertaining to (or, especially of a language: spoken in) in an area which is at a greater elevation, for example more mountainous, than other regions.
  2. Having a specified elevation or height; tall.
    three feet high   three Mount Everests high
  3. Elevated in status, esteem, or prestige, or in importance or development; exalted in rank, station, or character.
    The oldest of the elves’ royal family still conversed in High Elvish.
    • 1855-57, Charles Dickens Little Dorrit
      The Barnacles were a very high family, and a very large family. They were dispersed all over the public offices, and held all sorts of public places.
    • 2007, Sheila Finch, Shaper’s Legacy →ISBN, page 122:
      Not a one of them was old enough to know what the high past of Liani separatism had really been like.
    1. Most exalted; foremost.
      the high priest, the high officials of the court, the high altar
    2. Of great importance and consequence: grave (if negative) or solemn (if positive).
      high crimes, the high festival of the sun
    3. Consummate; advanced (e.g. in development) to the utmost extent or culmination, or possessing a quality in its supreme degree, at its zenith.
      high (i.e. intense) heat; high (i.e. full or quite) noon; high (i.e. rich or spicy) seasoning; high (i.e. complete) pleasure; high (i.e. deep or vivid) colour; high (i.e. extensive, thorough) scholarship; high tide; high [tourism] season; the High Middle Ages
      • High time it is this war now ended were.
      • 1709-1710, Thomas Baker, Reflections on Learning
        High sauces and rich spices are fetch’d from the Indies.
    4. Advanced in complexity (and hence potentially abstract and/or difficult to comprehend).
      • 1802, William Wordsworth, England 1802
        Plain living and high thinking are no more.
  4. (in several set phrases) Very traditionalist and conservative, especially in favoring older ways of doing things; see e.g. high church, High Tory.
    • 1858, Joseph Howe, Speeches and Public Letters, page 346:
      The letter of a “Pioneer” was sent to the Chronicle office by a very respectable man, of a high conservative family, but whose interests have been injuriously affected by the constant fluctuations in the commercial policy of England.
    • 1861 (printed 2003), Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Regnery Publishing (→ISBN)
      His family was ardently royalist, and might be compared to a high Tory family on this side the water; with some change of conditions, their prejudices and disposition of the mind were the same.
    • 2005, Jesse D. Geller, John C. Norcross, David E. Orlinsky, The Psychotherapist’s Own Psychotherapy, Oxford University Press (→ISBN), page 69:
      My father was the youngest son of a High-Church and high Tory family, the politically leftwing and religiously Nonconformist rebel; and antiimperialist who nearly lost his position in the City by refusing to sign his firm’s pro–Boer War petition.
  5. Elevated in mood; marked by great merriment, excitement, etc.
    in high spirits
    • 1970, Grateful Dead, High Time, on the album Workingman’s Dead
      I was having a high time, living the good life.
  6. (of a lifestyle) Luxurious; rich.
    high living, the high life
    • 2010, Rose Maria McCarthy Anding. High Heels, Honey Lips, & White Powder
      I was living the high lifestyle in famous sex clubs, relaxing on luxurious sofas, in the saunas and whirlpools, enjoying moments of excitement with my male and female companions while sipping champagne from crystal glasses.
  7. Lofty, often to the point of arrogant, haughty, boastful, proud.
    a high tone
    • An high look and a proud heart [] is sin.
    • His forces, after all the high discourses, amounted really but to eighteen hundred foot.
  8. (with “on” or “about”) Keen, enthused.
    • 2010, Lena, quoted by S. Rosenbloom, The Multiracial Urban High School: Fearing Peers and Trusting Friends (→ISBN), chapter four:
      I’m not that high about the relationship.
  9. (of a body of water) With tall waves.
  10. Remote (to the north or south) from the equator; situated at (or constituting) a latitude which is expressed by a large number.
    high latitude, fish species in high arctic and antarctic areas
    • 1966, Symposium on Antarctic Oceanography: Papers, page 242:
      But other euphausiids, Euphausia crystallorophias, are found in the pack ice region of the high Antarctic as food of Blue and Minke Whales (Marr, 1956). E. vallentini is very important in the lower Antarctic region, around []
    • 1990, International Union of Game Biologists. Congress, Transactions, the XIXth IUGB Congress: Population dynamics, page 219:
      We predict that L. arctica will coincide with the whole reindeer-caribou distribution, probably excepted Svalbard, South Georgia and other high-polar areas.
    • 1999, Peter John Hodum, Foraging Ecology and Reproductive Energetics of Antarctic Fulmarine Petrels, page 8:
      [] petrels, which breed primarily in the high Antarctic, the Rauer Islands are fairly central in their breeding distribution. This study documents the breeding biology of these four species of fulmarine petrels on Hop Island, Rauer Islands during  []
    • 2004, Berichte zur Polar- und Meeresforschungvolume 481-483, page 1:
      Except for some lithodid crabs that have recently been found in the Antarctic Bellingshausen Sea (Klages et al., 1995; Arana and Retamal, 2000), reptants are not known from high polar areas, where water temperature at the seafloor drops permanently below about 0°C.
    • 2007, Zoological Studies, volume 46, iissues 1-3, page 371:
      This study also analyzed the sources of variations over an environmental gradient extending from low (subtropical) to high (sub-Antarctic) latitudes.
  11. Large, great (in amount or quantity, value, force, energy, etc).
    • Can heavenly minds such high resentment show?
    1. Having a large or comparatively larger concentration of (a substance, which is often but not always linked by “in” when predicative).
    • 1907, The American Exporter, volume 60, page 101:
      Anyone can determine for himself whether certain wire is high carbon or not. Heat a piece of the wire red hot and while red plunge into water till cold.
  12. (acoustics) Acute or shrill in pitch, due to being of greater frequency, i.e. produced by more rapid vibrations (wave oscillations).
  13. (phonetics) Made with some part of the tongue positioned high in the mouth, relatively close to the palate.
  14. (card games) Greater in value than other cards, denominations, suits, etc.
    1. (poker) Having the highest rank in a straight, flush or straight flush.
      I have KT742 of the same suit. In other words, a K-high flush.
      9-high straight = 98765 unsuited
      Royal Flush = AKQJT suited = A-high straight flush
    2. (of a card or hand) Winning; able to take a trick, win a round, etc.
      North’s hand was high. East was in trouble.
      • 1894, Harper’s Magazine, volume 88, page 910:
        Cutler pushed forward the two necessary white chips. No one’s hand was high, and Loomis made a slight winning.
  15. (of meat, especially venison) Strong-scented; slightly tainted/spoiled; beginning to decompose.
    Epicures do not cook game before it is high.
  16. (informal) Intoxicated; under the influence of a mood-altering drug, formerly usually alcohol, but now (from the mid-20th century) usually not alcohol but rather marijuana, cocaine, heroin, etc.
  17. (nautical, of a sailing ship) Near, in its direction of travel, to the (direction of the) wind.
  18. (sports such as soccer) Positioned up the field, towards the opposing team’s goal.
    Our defensive line is too high.
Synonyms
  • haute, hawt
  • (elevated): See Thesaurus:tall
  • (intoxicated): See Thesaurus:stoned or Thesaurus:drunk
Antonyms
  • low
Hyponyms
Derived terms

Pages starting with “high”.

Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: hei
Translations
See also
  • mighty

Adverb

high (comparative higher, superlative highest)

  1. In or to an elevated position.
    How high above land did you fly?
  2. In or at a great value.
    Costs have grown higher this year again.
  3. At a pitch of great frequency.
    I certainly can’t sing that high.
Usage notes
  • The adverb high and the adverb highly should not be confused.
    He hung the picture high on the wall.
    As a politician, he isn’t esteemed too highly.
Translations
References
  • Yuri Dolgopolov, A Dictionary of Confusable Phrases: More Than 10,000 Idioms (2016, →ISBN): “high on something”

Noun

high (plural highs)

  1. A high point or position, literally (as, an elevated place; a superior region; a height; the sky; heaven).or figuratively (as, a point of success or achievement; a time when things are at their best, greatest, most numerous, maximum, etc).
    It was one of the highs of his career.
    Inflation reached a ten-year high.
    • 2019, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      South Korea has reached a new high in a kind of air pollution measured in fine dust.

    1. The maximum atmospheric temperature recorded at a particular location, especially during one 24-hour period.
      Today’s high was 32 °C.
  2. A period of euphoria, from excitement or from an intake of drugs.
    • 2013, Daniel Taylor, Chelsea’s Branislav Ivanovic climbs highest to sink Benfica (in The Guardian, 15 May 2013)[3]
      They will have to reflect on a seventh successive defeat in a European final while Chelsea try to make sense of an eccentric season rife with controversy and bad feeling but once again one finishing on an exhilarating high.
  3. A drug that gives such a high.
  4. (meteorology, informal) A large area of elevated atmospheric pressure; an anticyclone.
    A large high is centred on the Azores.
  5. (card games) The highest card dealt or drawn.
Translations
See also
  • crash

Verb

high (third-person singular simple present highs, present participle highing, simple past and past participle highed)

  1. (obsolete) To rise.
    The sun higheth.

Etymology 2

From Middle English hiȝe, huȝe, huiȝe, huie, hige, from Old English hyġe (thought, mind, heart, disposition, intention, courage, pride), from Proto-West Germanic *hugi, from Proto-Germanic *hugiz (mind, sense), of unknown origin. Cognate with North Frisian huwggje (mind, sense), Middle Low German höge, hoge (thought, meaning, mood, happiness), Middle High German hüge, huge, hoge (mind, spirit, memory), Danish hu (mind), Swedish håg (mind, inclination), Icelandic hugur (mind). Related to Hugh.

Noun

high (plural highs)

  1. (obsolete)
  2. Thought; intention; determination; purpose.

Etymology 3

See hie.

Verb

high (third-person singular simple present highs, present participle highing, simple past and past participle highed)

  1. To hie; to hasten.

Anagrams

  • GHIH


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English lowe, lohe, lāh, from Old Norse lágr (low), from Proto-Germanic *lēgaz (lying, flat, situated near the ground, low), from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ- (to lie). Cognate with Scots laich (low), Low German leeg (low, feeble, bad), Danish lav (low), Icelandic lágur (low), West Frisian leech (low), North Frisian leeg, liig (low), Dutch laag (low), obsolete German läg (low). More at lie.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ləʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /loʊ/
  • Homophones: lo, Lowe
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Adjective

low (comparative lower, superlative lowest)

  1. Situated close to, or even below, the ground or another normal reference plane; not high or lofty.
    • 2012, Tyler Jo Smith, Dimitris Plantzos, A Companion to Greek Art (→ISBN):
      Narrative friezes in low relief were characteristic of Ionic architecture.
    1. Pertaining to (or, especially of a language: spoken in) in an area which is at a lesser elevation, closer to sea level (especially near the sea), than other regions.
    2. (baseball, of a ball) Below the batter’s knees.
  2. Of less than normal height or upward extent or growth, or of greater than normal depth or recession; below the average or normal level from which elevation is measured.
    • 1607 (edition of 1967), Edward Topsell, The history of four-footed beasts:
      It is a little low hearb  []
    • 1795, James Cavanah Murphy, Travels in Portugal, page 15:
      The men are well-proportioned, rather low than tall, have a brown complexion, and reserved countenance.
    • 1911(?), Anthony Trollope, Framley Parsonage, page 13:
      “Now you mention her, I do remember the young lady,” said Mrs. Grantly; “a dark girl, very low, and without much figure. She seemed to me to keep very much in the background.”
    1. Low-cut.
      • 1878, Mary Eliza Joy Haweis, The Art of Beauty, London : Chatto & Windus, page 83:
        Again, observe the unmeaningness of the low neck fashion. Our mothers wore low dresses and bare arms all day long; they knew if their shoulders and arms were beautiful they would look as well by daylight as by candlelight; []
      • 1917, George Amos Dorsey, Young Low, page 195:
        Why do girls wear low dresses?
  3. Not high in status, esteem, or rank, dignity, or quality. (Compare vulgar.)
    • 1971, Keystone Folklore Quarterly, volume 16, page 208:
      Therefore they must have been common in the 16th century also among the folk first of all not as a high festival food but rather as a low festival and Sunday food, if our experience proves accurate.
    • 1720, The Delphick oracle, page 35:
      Low-Sunday, is the Sunday after Easter, and is so call’d, because it is a low Festival in Comparison of that Day whereon Christ arose from Death to Life again.
  4. Humble, meek, not haughty.
  5. Disparaging; assigning little value or excellence.
    She had a low opinion of cats. He took a low view of dogs.
    • 1826, Ebenezer Erskine, The Whole Works of the Rev. Ebenezer Erskine, Sermon VII, page 103:
      The humble soul has low thoughts of his own person; as David, ‘I am a worm, and no man.’
  6. Being a nadir, a bottom.
    • 2012, Faith Hartmann, Only a Fool Would Have Believed It in the First Place (→ISBN):
      Virginia, for example, reached such a low point in her junior year that she briefly considered suicide […]
  7. Depressed in mood, dejected, sad.
  8. Lacking health or vitality, strength or vivacity; feeble; weak.
  9. Dead. (Compare lay low.)
    • 1830, George Gordon Byron Baron Byron, Byron’s Poems, page 511:
      And wilt thou weep when I am low?
    • 1879, Alfred Tennyson Baron Tennyson, Poetical Works, page 198:
      And let the mournful martial music blow; / For many a time in many a clime / The last great Englishman is low.
  10. Small, not high (in amount or quantity, value, force, energy, etc).
    • 1989, Bernard Smith, Sailloons and Fliptackers: The Limits to High-speed Sailing (→ISBN):
      Unfortunately, low winds were the rule over the local waters and this craft was no better, if as good, as ordinary sailboats under such conditions.
    1. Having a small or comparatively smaller concentration of (a substance, which is often but not always linked by “in” when predicative).
       
    2. Depleted, or nearing deletion; lacking in supply.
  11. (especially in biology) Simple in complexity or development.
    • 1870, Edward Burnett Tylor, Researches Into the Early History of Mankind and the Development of Civilization, page 80:
      In the case of languages spoken by very low races, like the Puris and the Tasmanians, the difficulty of deciding such a point must be very great.
  12. (chiefly in several set phrases) Favoring simplicity (see e.g. low church, Low Tory).
    • 1881, Anthony Trollope, Dr. Wortle’s School: A Novel, page 6:
      Among them there was none more low, more pious, more sincere, or more given to interference. To teach Mr. Worth his duty as a parish clergyman was evidently a necessity to such a bishop.
    • 1889, Reginald Garton Wilberforce, Life of Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford and Winchester, page 152:
      [] and give a judgment against not only Denison, but the Church’s doctrine; and that, it having once been given, we shall not get it reversed; and that the Church of England will seem to be committed to Low doctrine, which []
  13. (in several set phrases) Being near the equator.
  14. (acoustics) Grave in pitch, due to being produced by relatively slow vibrations (wave oscillations); flat.
  15. Quiet; soft; not loud.
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act II, scene i:
      Speak low if you speak love.
  16. (phonetics) Made with a relatively large opening between the tongue and the palate; made with (part of) the tongue positioned low in the mouth, relative to the palate.
  17. (card games) Lesser in value than other cards, denominations, suits, etc.
  18. (now rare) Not rich or seasoned; offering the minimum of nutritional requirements; plain, simple. [from 17th c.]
    • 1789, John Moore, Zeluco, Valancourt 2008, p. 173:
      The Physicians ordered a low diet, and cooling ptisans in great abundance.
  19. (of an automobile, gear, etc) Designed for a slow (or the slowest) speed.
Synonyms
  • (in a position comparatively close to the ground): nether, underslung
  • (small in height): short, small
  • (depressed): blue, depressed, down, miserable, sad, unhappy, gloomy
  • (not high in an amount): reduced, devalued, low-level
  • (of a pitch, suggesting a lower frequency): low-pitched, deep, flat
  • (of a loudness, suggesting a lower amplitude): low-toned, soft
  • (despicable thing to do): immoral, abject, scummy, scurvy
Antonyms
  • (in a position comparatively close to the ground): high
  • (small in length): tall
Derived terms
Related terms
  • below
Translations

Noun

low (plural lows)

  1. A low point or position, literally (as, a depth) or or figuratively (as, a nadir, a time when things are at their worst, least, minimum, etc).
    Unemployment has reached a ten-year low.
    1. The minimum atmospheric temperature recorded at a particular location, especially during one 24-hour period.
      Today’s low was 32 °F.
  2. A period of depression; a depressed mood or situation.
    He is in a low right now.   the highs and lows of bipolar disorder
  3. (meteorology, informal) An area of low pressure; a depression.
    A deep low is centred over the British Isles.
  4. The lowest-speed gearing of a power-transmission system, especially of an automotive vehicle.
    Shift out of low before the car gets to eight miles per hour.
  5. (card games) The lowest trump, usually the deuce; the lowest trump dealt or drawn.
  6. (slang, usually accompanied by “the”) A cheap, cost-efficient, or advantageous price.
    He got the brand new Yankees jersey for the low.
Derived terms
Translations

Adverb

low (comparative lower, superlative lowest)

  1. Close to the ground.
  2. Of a pitch, at a lower frequency.
  3. With a low voice or sound; not loudly; gently.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Eleanor
      The [] odorous wind / Breathes low between the sunset and the moon.
  4. Under the usual price; at a moderate price; cheaply.
  5. In a low mean condition; humbly; meanly.
  6. In a time approaching our own.
    • In that part of the world which was first inhabited, [] even as low down as Abraham’s time, they wandered with their flocks and herds.
  7. (astronomy) In a path near the equator, so that the declination is small, or near the horizon, so that the altitude is small; said of the heavenly bodies with reference to the diurnal revolution.
    The moon runs low, i.e. comparatively near the horizon when on or near the meridian.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

low (third-person singular simple present lows, present participle lowing, simple past and past participle lowed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To lower; to make low.
    • 1654 (edition of 1762), Andrew Gray, The Works of […] Andrew Gray [Edited by R. Trail and J. Stirling], page 112:
      I shall only say this, that all the other graces must low the sail to faith, and so it is faith must carry us through, being that last triumphing grace, []
    • 1661 (edition of 1885), Joseph Glanvill, Scepsis Scientifica: […] Vanity of Dogmatizing, page 85:
      Now to use these as Hypotheseis, as himself in his Word, is pleas’d to low himself to our capacities, is allowable:
    • 1790, Andrew Shirrefs, Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect, page 219:
      The merry fowks that were the ben, / By this time ‘gan to low their strain
    • 1807, James Ruickbie, The Way-side Cottager; […] Miscellaneous Poems, page 178:
      She was quite free of bad inventions, / But was a bitch o high pretenfions, / For the grit folk o’ a dimensions, / Ran for her breed; / Dog-officers may low their pensions, / Since Venie’s dead, ‘Twas past the art o’man to cure her, / []
    • 1899 May 6, Shetland News:
      Dat ‘ill be somtin’ ta hise an’ low wi’ a ütterly breeze.

Etymology 2

From Middle English lough, from Old English hlōg, preterite of hliehhan (to laugh). More at laugh.

Verb

low

  1. (obsolete) simple past of laugh.

Etymology 3

From Middle English lowen (to low), from Old English hlōwan (to low, bellow, roar), from Proto-Germanic *hlōaną (to call, shout), from Proto-Indo-European *kelh₁- (to call). Cognate with Dutch loeien (to low), Middle High German lüejen (to roar), dialectal Swedish lumma (to roar), Latin calō (I call), Ancient Greek καλέω (kaléō), Latin clāmō (I shout, claim). More at claim.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ləʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /loʊ/
  • Homophones: lo, Lowe
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Verb

low (third-person singular simple present lows, present participle lowing, simple past and past participle lowed)

  1. (intransitive) To moo.
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English lowe, loghe, from Old Norse logi (fire, flame, sword), from Proto-Germanic *lugô (flame, blaze), from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (light). Cognate with Icelandic logi (flame), Swedish låga (flame), Danish lue (flame), German Lohe (blaze, flames), North Frisian leag (fire, flame), Old English līeġ (fire, flame, lightning). More at leye, light.

Alternative forms

  • lowe

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ləʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /loʊ/

Noun

low (plural lows)

  1. (countable, Britain, Scotland, dialect) A flame; fire; blaze.
    • 1815, Walter Scott, Guy Mannering, page 85:
      She was, as one of them expressed himself, in a light low (bright flame) when they observed a king’s ship, with her colours up, heave in sight from behind the cape. The guns of the burning vessel discharged themselves []
    • 1843, John Wilson, The Noctes Ambrosianœ of “Blackwood”., page 478:
      A boy fell aff his chair a’ in a low, for the discharge had set him on fire []
Translations

Verb

low (third-person singular simple present lows, present participle lowing, simple past and past participle lowed)

  1. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) To burn; to blaze.
    • 1724 (edition of 1788), Allan Ramsay, The Tea-Table Miscellany, page 23:
      Driest wood will eithest low,
    • 1870, Edward Peacock, Ralf Skirlaugh, the Lincolnshire Squire: A Novel, page 197:
      [] in every crevice; and each individual brick shone and “lowed” with the intense heat. “As I am a Christian man,” thought he, “this is verily the mouth of the pit; and I am lost — lost for ever, for —”
    • 1894, Samuel Rutherford Crockett, The Raiders, page 82:
      Sand, striking a light with his flint and steel, and transferring the flame when it lowed up to the bowl of his tiny elf’s pipe, so small that it just let in the top of his little finger as he settled the tobacco in it as it began to burn.
    • 1895, Robert Louis Stevenson, Works, page 382:
      The next I saw, James parried a thrust so nearly that I thought him killed; and it lowed up in my mind that this was the girl’s father, and in a manner almost my own, and I drew and ran in to sever them.

Etymology 5

From Old English hlāw, hlǣw (burial mound), from Proto-Germanic *hlaiwaz. Obsolete by the 19th century, survives in toponymy as -low.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ləʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /loʊ/
  • Homophones: lo, Lowe
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Alternative forms

  • lawe

Noun

low (plural lows)

  1. (archaic or obsolete) Barrow, mound, tumulus.
  2. (Scottish dialectal, archaic) A hill.

Anagrams

  • OWL, WoL, owl

Chinese

Etymology

From English low.

Adjective

low

  1. (slang) Of low stature; uncivilized; uncouth.
    low的行為 / low的行为  ―  hěn low de xíngwèi  ―  highly uncivilized behavior

Manx

Etymology

Borrowed from English allow.

Verb

low (verbal noun lowal, past participle lowit)

  1. to allow, permit
  2. to justify

Antonyms

  • (allow, permit): meelow, neulow

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