hill vs mound what difference

what is difference between hill and mound

English

Etymology

From Middle English hill, from Old English hyll (hill), from Proto-Germanic *hulliz (stone, rock), from Proto-Indo-European *kl̥Hnís (top, hill, rock). Cognate with Middle Dutch hille, hulle (hill), Low German hull (hill), Old Norse hóll (hill), Latin collis (hill), Lithuanian kalnas, Albanian kallumë (big pile, tall heap), Russian холм (xolm, hill), Old English holm (rising land, island). More at holm.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hĭl, IPA(key): /hɪl/, [hɪɫ]
  • Rhymes: -ɪl
  • Homophone: heel (in some dialects)

Noun

hill (plural hills)

  1. An elevated landmass smaller than a mountain.
    • So this was my future home, I thought! [] Backed by towering hills, the but faintly discernible purple line of the French boundary off to the southwest, a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one’s dreams.
  2. A sloping road.
  3. (US) A heap of earth surrounding a plant.
  4. (US) A single cluster or group of plants growing close together, and having the earth heaped up about them.
  5. (baseball) The pitcher’s mound.
  6. The raised portion of the surface of a vinyl record.
    Antonym: dale

Hyponyms

  • (elevation): hillock, toman (smaller hills)

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • hill on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Hill in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Verb

hill (third-person singular simple present hills, present participle hilling, simple past and past participle hilled)

  1. To form into a heap or mound.
  2. To heap or draw earth around plants.

Translations


Westrobothnian

Etymology

Cognate with Icelandic hilla, Swedish hylla.

Noun

hill f (definite singular hilla)

  1. shelf

Synonyms

  • fjahl


English

Etymology

From earlier meaning “hedge, fence”, from Middle English mound, mund (protection, boundary, raised earthen rampart), from Old English mund (hand, hand of protection, protector, guardianship), from Proto-Germanic *mundō (hand), *munduz (protection, patron), from Proto-Indo-European *mh₂-nt-éh₂ (the beckoning one), from *men-, *man-, *mar- (hand). Cognate with Old Frisian mund (guardianship), Old High German munt (hand, protection) (German Mündel (ward), Vormund (a guardian)), Old Norse mund (hand) (Icelandic mund), Middle Dutch mond (protection), Latin manus (hand), Ancient Greek μάρη (márē, hand).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /maʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Noun

mound (plural mounds)

  1. An artificial hill or elevation of earth; a raised bank; an embankment thrown up for defense
    Synonyms: bulwark, rampart
  2. A natural elevation appearing as if thrown up artificially; a regular and isolated hill, hillock, or knoll.
  3. (baseball) Elevated area of dirt upon which the pitcher stands to pitch.
  4. A ball or globe forming part of the regalia of an emperor or other sovereign. It is encircled with bands, enriched with precious stones, and surmounted with a cross.
  5. (US, vulgar, slang) The mons veneris.
  6. (obsolete, anatomy, measurement, figuratively) A hand.
  7. (obsolete) A protection; restraint; curb.
  8. (obsolete) A helmet.
  9. (obsolete) Might; size.

Synonyms

  • (part of regalia): globus cruciger, globe, orb

Derived terms

  • shaftmound

Translations

Verb

mound (third-person singular simple present mounds, present participle mounding, simple past and past participle mounded)

  1. (transitive) To fortify with a mound; add a barrier, rampart, etc. to.
  2. (transitive) To force or pile into a mound or mounds.

Synonyms

  • (fortify with a mound): bank, bank up, bulwark, rampart
  • (pile into mounds): heap up, pile; see also Thesaurus:pile up

Derived terms

  • amound

Translations

See also

  • mound on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Mound in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Mudon, Mundo

Middle English

Noun

mound

  1. Alternative form of mund

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