hit vs make what difference

what is difference between hit and make

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hĭt, IPA(key): /hɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English hitten (to hit, strike, make contact with), from Old English hittan (to meet with, come upon, fall in with), from Old Norse hitta (to strike, meet), from Proto-Germanic *hittijaną (to come upon, find), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂eyd- (to fall; fall upon; hit; cut; hew).

Cognate with Icelandic hitta (to meet), Danish hitte (to find), Latin caedō (to kill), Albanian qit (to hit, throw, pull out, release).

Verb

hit (third-person singular simple present hits, present participle hitting, simple past hit or (dialectal, obsolete) hat or (rare, dialectal) het, past participle hit or (archaic, rare, dialectal) hitten)

  1. (heading, physical) To strike.
    1. (transitive) To administer a blow to, directly or with a weapon or missile.
      • 1922-1927, Frank Harris, My Life and Loves
        He tried to hit me but I dodged the blow and went out to plot revenge.
      • 1934, Robert E. Howard, The Slugger’s Game
        I hunted him for half a hour, aiming to learn him to hit a man with a table-leg and then run, but I didn’t find him.
    2. (transitive) To come into contact with forcefully and suddenly.
      • a dozen apples, each of them near as large as a Bristol barrel, came tumbling about my ears; one of them hit me on the back as I chanced to stoop, and knocked me down flat on my face.
      • 1882, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Doctor Grimshawe’s Secret: A romance
        Meanwhile the street boys kept up a shower of mud balls, many of which hit the Doctor, while the rest were distributed upon his assailants.
    3. (intransitive) To strike against something.
      • If bodies be extension alone, [] how can they move and hit one against another?
    4. (transitive) To activate a button or key by pressing and releasing it.
    5. (transitive, slang) To kill a person, usually on the instructions of a third party.
      • 1973, Mario Puzo, Francis Ford Coppola, The Godfather Part II (screenplay, second draft)
        FREDO: Mikey, why would they ever hit poor old Frankie Five-Angels? I loved that ole sonuvabitch.
    6. (transitive, military) To attack, especially amphibiously.
  2. (transitive) To manage to touch (a target) in the right place.
    I hit the jackpot.
    Antonym: miss
  3. (transitive, colloquial) To switch on.
    Antonyms: cut, kill
    Somebody’s been here! Hit the lights!
  4. (transitive, colloquial) To briefly visit.
  5. (transitive, informal) To encounter an obstacle or other difficulty.
  6. (heading) To attain, to achieve.
    1. (transitive, informal) To reach or achieve.
      • 2012, August 1. Owen Gibson in Guardian Unlimited, London 2012: rowers Glover and Stanning win Team GB’s first gold medal:
        And her success with Glover, a product of the National Lottery-funded Sporting Giants talent identification programme, will also spark relief among British officials who were starting to fret a little about hitting their target of equalling fourth in the medal table from Beijing.
    2. (intransitive) To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, often by luck.
    3. To guess; to light upon or discover.
  7. (transitive) To affect negatively.
  8. (figuratively) To attack.
  9. (heading, games) To make a play.
    1. (transitive, card games) In blackjack, to deal a card to.
    2. (intransitive, baseball) To come up to bat.
    3. (backgammon) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; said of a single unprotected piece on a point.
  10. (transitive, computing, programming) To use; to connect to.
  11. (transitive, US, slang) To have sex with.
  12. (transitive, US, slang) To inhale an amount of smoke from a narcotic substance, particularly marijuana.
Synonyms
  • (administer a blow): beat, pelt, thump; see also Thesaurus:hit
  • (kill a person): bump off, do away with, whack; see also Thesaurus:kill
  • (attack): beset, fall upon, lay into; see also Thesaurus:attack
  • (have sex with): bang, ram, smash; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
  • (smoke marijuana): smoke up, toke
Antonyms
  • (manage to touch in the right place): miss
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

hit (plural hits)

  1. A blow; a punch; a striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything.
    • So he the fam’d Cilician fencer prais’d, / And, at each hit, with wonder seem’d amaz’d.
    The hit was very slight.
  2. Something very successful, such as a song, film, or video game, that receives widespread recognition and acclaim.
  3. An attack on a location, person or people.
  4. A collision of a projectile with the target.
    1. In the game of Battleship, a correct guess at where one’s opponent ship is.
  5. (computing, Internet) A match found by searching a computer system or search engine
  6. (Internet) A measured visit to a web site, a request for a single file from a web server.
    My site received twice as many hits after being listed in a search engine.
  7. An approximately correct answer in a test set.
  8. (baseball) The complete play, when the batter reaches base without the benefit of a walk, error, or fielder’s choice.
    The catcher got a hit to lead off the fifth.
  9. (colloquial) A dose of an illegal or addictive drug.
    Where am I going to get my next hit?
  10. A premeditated murder done for criminal or political purposes.
  11. (dated) A peculiarly apt expression or turn of thought; a phrase which hits the mark.
    a happy hit
  12. (backgammon) A move that throws one of the opponent’s men back to the entering point.
  13. (backgammon) A game won after the adversary has removed some of his men. It counts for less than a gammon.
Antonyms
  • (a punch): miss
  • (success): flop, turkey
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations

Adjective

hit (not comparable)

  1. Very successful.
    The band played their hit song to the delight of the fans.

Etymology 2

From Middle English hit (it), from Old English hit (it), from Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, here). Cognate with Dutch het (it). More at it. Note ‘it.

Pronoun

hit (subjective and objective hit, reflexive and intensive hitself, possessive adjective and noun hits)

  1. (dialectal) It.
    • 1922, Philip Gengembre Hubert, The Atlantic monthly, Volume 130:
      But how hit was to come about didn’t appear.
    • 1998, Nancy A. Walker, What’s so funny?: humor in American culture:
      Now, George, grease it good, an’ let hit slide down the hill hits own way.
Derived terms
  • hits
  • hitself

Anagrams

  • Thi, iht, ith, thi-

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

  • hüt, hüüd (Uri)

Etymology

From Old High German hiutu, from hiu +‎ tagu, a calque of Latin hodie. Cognate with German heute, Dutch heden.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɪt/

Adverb

hit

  1. (Alsatian) today

Catalan

Etymology

From English hit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hit/

Noun

hit m (plural hits)

  1. hit (something very successful)
    Synonym: èxit

References


Chamorro

Etymology

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(i-)kita, from Proto-Austronesian *(i-)kita. Doublet of ta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hit/

Pronoun

hit

  1. we, us (inclusive)

Usage notes

  • hit is used either as a subject of an intransitive verb or as an object of a transitive verb, while ta is used as a subject of a transitive verb.
  • In transitive clauses with an indefinite object, hit can be used as a subject.

See also

References

  • Donald M. Topping (1973) Chamorro Reference Grammar[6], Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.

Czech

Etymology

From English hit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɪt/

Noun

hit m

  1. hit (a success, especially in the entertainment industry)
    Synonym: šlágr

Danish

Etymology

From English hit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hit/, [ˈhid̥]

Noun

hit n (singular definite hittet, plural indefinite hit or hits)

  1. hit (something very successful)

Inflection

Further reading

  • “hit” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦɪt/
  • Hyphenation: hit
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English hit.

Noun

hit m (plural hits, diminutive hitje n)

  1. A hit song, a very popular and successful song.
  2. (by extension) A success, something popular and successful (especially in the entertainment industry).
Derived terms
  • feesthit
  • kersthit
  • zomerhit

Etymology 2

Shortening of Hitlander (Shetlander).

Noun

hit m (plural hitten, diminutive hitje n or hitske n)

  1. (dated) A Shetland pony.
  2. (dated, regional) Any pony or small horse.
Derived terms
  • daghit

Hungarian

Etymology

From hisz (to believe).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhit]
  • Rhymes: -it

Noun

hit (plural hitek)

  1. faith, belief
  2. (archaic) oath, word of honour (e.g. in hitves and hitet tesz)

Declension

Derived terms

(Expressions):

  • hitet tesz

Further reading

  • hit in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Lashi

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hit/

Adverb

hit

  1. here

Determiner

hit

  1. this

References

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[7], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Limburgish

Etymology

From Dutch hit, from English hit.

Noun

hit f

  1. (slang, Dutch) something popular (book, song, band, country)

Usage notes

Slang. Mainly used when speaking Dutch, rather than in real Limburgish. Overall speaking, Limburgish is more conservative, therefore slaag is more often used.

Inflection

  • Dative and accusative are nowadays obsolete, use nominative instead.
  • The dative got out of use around 1900. As this is a recent loanword, there is no conjugation for it to be found.

Middle Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɪt/

Pronoun

hit

  1. Alternative form of het

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • hyt, hitt, hitte, hytte, it, yt, itt, jt, itte

Etymology

From Old English hit, from Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, here).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hit/, /it/

Pronoun

hit (accusative hit, genitive hit, his, possessive determiner hit, his)

  1. Third-person singular neuter pronoun: it
  2. Sometimes used in reference to a child or man: he, she
  3. Third-person singular neuter accusative pronoun: it
  4. Third-person singular neuter genitive pronoun: its
  5. (impersonal, placeholder) Third-person singular impersonal placeholder pronoun: it

Descendants

  • English: it
  • Scots: hid

See also

Determiner

hit (nominative pronoun hit)

  1. Third-person singular neuter possessive determiner: it

References

  • “hit, pron.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 27 May 2018.

Min Nan


Norwegian Bokmål

Adverb

hit

  1. here (to this place)

References

  • “hit” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hiːt/

Adverb

hit

  1. here (to this place)

References

  • “hit” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *hit.

Pronoun

hit

  1. it

Alternative forms

  • it

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: het
    • Dutch: het (only the pronoun; the definite article is a weakened form of dat)
    • Limburgish: hèt

Further reading

  • “hit”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English

Alternative forms

  • hitt

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, here). Cognate with Old Frisian hit (it), Old High German iz (it), Gothic ???????????????? (hita, it). More at .

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xit/, [hit]

Pronoun

hit n (accusative hit, genitive his, dative him)

  1. it

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: hit, hyt, hitt, hitte, hytte, it, yt, itt, jt, itte
    • English: it
    • Scots: hid

Old Norse

Etymology

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Article

hit

  1. neuter nominative/accusative singular of hinn

Declension


Polish

Etymology

From English hit, from Middle English hitten, from Old English hittan, from Old Norse hitta, from Proto-Germanic *hittijaną, from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂eyd-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xʲit/

Noun

hit m inan

  1. hit (a success, especially in the entertainment industry)

Declension

Further reading

  • hit in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • hit in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From English hit.

Noun

hit m (plural hits)

  1. hit (success, especially in the entertainment industry)
    Synonym: sucesso

Further reading

  • “hit” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish

Etymology

From English hit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxit/, [ˈxit̪]

Noun

hit m (plural hits)

  1. hit (success)
    Synonym: éxito

Swedish

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish hit, from *+at.

  • , from Proto-Indo-European *kei- (as in Ancient Greek ἐκεῖ (ekeî))
  • at, from Proto-Germanic *at, from Proto-Indo-European *ád (as in Swedish åt)

Composed in a similar way: Icelandic hegat and hingað.

Pronunciation

Adverb

hit (not comparable)

  1. here; to this place, hither
Antonyms
  • dit
Related terms
  • hitåt
See also
  • hit och dit
  • här

Etymology 2

From English hit.

Noun

hit c

  1. (informal) hit; something very popular. (A book, a movie, a song, …)


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /meɪk/, [meɪkʲ]
  • Rhymes: -eɪk

Etymology 1

From Middle English maken, from Old English macian (to make, build, work), from Proto-West Germanic *makōn (to make, build, work), from Proto-Indo-European *mag- (to knead, mix, make). Cognate with Latin mācerō, macer, Ancient Greek μάσσω (mássō), Scots mak (to make), Saterland Frisian moakje (to make), West Frisian meitsje (to make), Dutch maken (to make), Dutch Low Saxon maken (to make) and German Low German maken (to make), and German machen (to make, do). Related to match.

Alternative forms

  • mak (Wearside, Durham, dialectal)
  • makee (pronunciation spelling)
  • myek (Tyneside, dialectal)

Verb

make (third-person singular simple present makes, present participle making, simple past and past participle made or (dialectal or obsolete) maked)

  1. (transitive) To create.
    1. To build, construct, produce, or originate.
      Synonyms: fabricate; see also Thesaurus:build
      • I made a speaking trumpet of my hands and commenced to whoop “Ahoy!” and “Hello!” at the top of my lungs. […] The Colonel woke up, and, after asking what in brimstone was the matter, opened his mouth and roared “Hi!” and “Hello!” like the bull of Bashan.
      • Yet in “Through a Latte, Darkly”, a new study of how Starbucks has largely avoided paying tax in Britain, Edward Kleinbard [] shows that current tax rules make it easy for all sorts of firms to generate what he calls “stateless income”: []. In Starbucks’s case, the firm has in effect turned the process of making an expensive cup of coffee into intellectual property.
    2. To write or compose.
    3. To bring about; to effect or produce by means of some action.
    4. (religious) To create (the universe), especially (in Christianity) from nothing.
  2. (intransitive, now mostly colloquial) To behave, to act.
  3. (intransitive) To tend; to contribute; to have effect; with for or against.
    • 1873, Matthew Arnold, Literature and Dogma
      And all Israel’s language about this power , except that it makes for righteousness , is approximate language
  4. To constitute.
    • 1995, Harriette Simpson Arnow: Critical Essays on Her Work, p.46:
      Style alone does not make a writer.
    • 2014, A teacher, “Choosing a primary school: a teacher’s guide for parents”, The Guardian, 23 September:
      So if your prospective school is proudly displaying that “We Are Outstanding” banner on its perimeter fence, well, that is wonderful … but do bear in mind that in all likelihood it has been awarded for results in those two subjects, rather than for its delivery of a broad and balanced curriculum which brings out the best in every child. Which is, of course, what makes a great primary school.
  5. (transitive) To add up to, have a sum of.
  6. (transitive, construed with of, typically interrogative) To interpret.
    They couldn’t make anything of the inscription.
  7. (transitive, usually stressed) To bring into success.
  8. (ditransitive, second object is an adjective or participle) To cause to be.
    Synonym: render
  9. To cause to appear to be; to represent as.
    • 1709-1710, Thomas Baker, Reflections on Learning
      He is not that goose and Ass that Valla would make him.
    • So this was my future home, I thought! Certainly it made a brave picture. I had seen similar ones fired-in on many a Heidelberg stein. Backed by towering hills, [] a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one’s dreams.
  10. (ditransitive, second object is a verb) To cause (to do something); to compel (to do something).
  11. (ditransitive, second object is a verb, can be stressed for emphasis or clarity) To force to do.
  12. (ditransitive, of a fact) To indicate or suggest to be.
  13. (transitive, of a bed) To cover neatly with bedclothes.
  14. (transitive, US slang, crime, law enforcement) To recognise, identify, spot.
    Synonyms: twig, notice; see also Thesaurus:identify
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p.33:
      I caught sight of him two or three times and then made him turning north into Laurel Canyon Drive.
    • 2004, George Nolfi et al., Ocean’s Twelve, Warner Bros. Pictures, 0:50:30:
      Linus Caldwell: Well, she just made Danny and Yen, which means in the next 48 hours the three o’ your pictures are gonna be in every police station in Europe.
    • 2007 May 4, Andrew Dettmann et al., “Under Pressure”, episode 3-22 of Numb3rs, 00:01:16:
      David Sinclair: (walking) Almost at Seventh; I should have a visual any second now. (rounds a corner, almost collides into Kaleed Asan) Damn, that was close.
      Don Eppes: David, he make you?
      David Sinclair: No, I don’t think so.
  15. (transitive, colloquial) To arrive at a destination, usually at or by a certain time.
  16. (intransitive, colloquial) To proceed (in a direction).
  17. (transitive) To cover (a given distance) by travelling. [from 16thc.]
  18. (transitive) To move at (a speed). [from 17thc.]
  19. To appoint; to name.
    • 1991, Bernard Guenée, Between Church and State: The Lives of Four French Prelates →ISBN:
      On November 15, 1396, [] Benedict XIII made him bishop of Noyon;
  20. (transitive, slang) To induct into the Mafia or a similar organization (as a made man).
    • 1990, Nicholas Pileggi & Martin Scorsese, Goodfellas:
      Jimmy Conway: They’re gonna make him.
      Henry Hill: Paulie’s gonna make you?
  21. (intransitive, colloquial, euphemistic) To defecate or urinate.
  22. (transitive) To earn, to gain (money, points, membership or status).
  23. (transitive) To pay, to cover (an expense); chiefly used after expressions of inability.
    • 1889 May 1, Chief Justice George P. Raney, Pensacola & A. R. Co. v. State of Florida (judicial opinion), reproduced in The Southern Reporter, Volume 5, West Publishing Company, p.843:
      Whether, [], the construction of additional roads [] would present a case in which the exaction of prohibitory or otherwise onerous rates may be prevented, though it result in an impossibility for some or all of the roads to make expenses, we need not say; no such case is before us.
    • 2005, Yuvi Shmul and Ron Peltier, Make It Big with Yuvi: How to Buy Or Start a Small Business, the Best Investment, AuthorHouse, →ISBN, p.67:
      At first glance, you may be able to make rent and other overhead expenses because the business is doing well, but if sales drop can you still make rent?
    • 2011, Donald Todrin, Successfully Navigating the Downturn, Entrepreneur Press, →ISBN, p.194:
      So you can’t make payroll. This happens. [] many business owners who have never confronted it before will be forced to deal with this most difficult matter of not making payroll.
  24. (obsolete, intransitive) To compose verses; to write poetry; to versify.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
    • ca.1360-1387, William Langland, Piers Plowman
      to solace him some time, as I do when I make
  25. To enact; to establish.
    • 1791, The First Amendment to the United States Constitution:
      Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
  26. To develop into; to prove to be.
  27. To form or formulate in the mind.
  28. To perform a feat.
  29. (intransitive) To gain sufficient audience to warrant its existence.
  30. (obsolete) To act in a certain manner; to have to do; to manage; to interfere; to be active; often in the phrase to meddle or make.
  31. (obsolete) To increase; to augment; to accrue.
  32. (obsolete) To be engaged or concerned in.
    • Gomez, what makest thou here, with a whole brotherhood of city bailiffs?
  33. (now archaic) To cause to be (in a specified place), used after a subjective what.
    • 1676, George Etherege, A Man of Mode:
      Footman. Madam! Mr. Dorimant!
      Lov. What makes him here?
    • 1816, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Christabel:
      What makes her in the wood so late, / A furlong from the castle gate?
  34. (transitive, euphemistic) To take the virginity of.
    • 1896, Rudyard Kipling, The Ladies
      I was a young un at ‘Oogli,
      Shy as a girl to begin;
      Aggie de Castrer she made me,
      — An’ Aggie was clever as sin;
      Older than me, but my first un —
      More like a mother she were
      Showed me the way to promotion an’ pay,
      An’ I learned about women from ‘er!
  35. (transitive) To have sexual intercourse with.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:copulate with
    • 1934, James T. Farrell, The Young Manhood of Studs Lonigan, Ch. 16:
      He could see that her face was thin, proud. She looked like she’d be a hard dame to make. He didn’t want just that. She’d be a hard dame to win.
  36. (intransitive) Of water, to flow toward land; to rise.
Usage notes
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb make had the form makest, and had madest for its past tense.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form maketh was used.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take

Noun

make (plural makes)

  1. Brand or kind; model.
    What make of car do you drive?
  2. Manner or style of construction (style of how a thing is made); form.
  3. Origin (of a manufactured article); manufacture; production.
    • 1914, Judicious Advertising, page 158:
      The Royal Typewriter Company is distributing a very attractive eight page folder, announcing the Royal Number 10, the first machine of Royal make which uses levers instead of wires to operate the type-bars.
    The camera was of German make.
  4. A person’s character or disposition.
  5. (dated) The act or process of making something, especially in industrial manufacturing.
  6. (uncountable) Quantity produced, especially of materials.
  7. (computing) A software utility for automatically building large applications, or an implementation of this utility.
  8. (slang) Identification or recognition (of identity), especially from police records or evidence.
    • 2003, Harlan Wygant, The Samurai Conspiracy: A Story of Revenge by the Author of “The Junkyard Dog.” (→ISBN), page 36:
      “I’m sure we’ll get a make on the suspect’s prints by day break, so if you come down town, I’ll see you get everything available. Go ahead and process the car, we won’t have any need of it.”
    • 2007, P. T. Deutermann, Hunting Season: A Novel, St. Martin’s Press (→ISBN):
      He got out his binoculars, trying for a make on the plate, but the plate light was conveniently not working. The windows must have been tinted, because he could not see inside the van, either.
    • 2008, H.A. Covington, The Brigade (→ISBN), page 660:
      “Okay, if I could understand correctly what Oscar was saying through all the doubletalk, we’ve got a make on the bigwig occupant of the convoy ahead. Chaim Lieberman, Israeli Ambassador to the United States.” “Shit,” said Gardner.
  9. (slang, usually in phrase “easy make”) Past, present, or future target of seduction (usually female).
  10. (slang, military) A promotion.
  11. A home-made project
  12. (card games) Turn to declare the trump for a hand (in bridge), or to shuffle the cards.
    • 1962 (edition), Leo Tolstoy, Hadji Murat: A Tale of the Caucasus:
      ‘Not your make,’ said the adjutant sternly and started dealing the cards with his white be-ringed hands as though he was in haste to get rid of them.
  13. (basketball) A made basket.
  14. (physics) The closing of an electrical circuit.
Synonyms
  • (brand): brand; type; manufacturer
  • (origin): origin; manufacture
  • (personal character): makeup, disposition, character; type, way
  • (act or process of making): making; manufacture; manufacturing; production
  • (construction): construction; manufacture
  • (quantity produced): production; output
  • (recognition): ID, identification
  • (target of seduction): lay
  • (closing circuit): closing; completion; actuation
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English make, imake, from Old English ġemaca (a mate, an equal, companion, peer), from Proto-Germanic *gamakô (companion, comrade), from Proto-Indo-European *maǵ- (to knead, oil). Reinforced by Old Norse maki (an equal). Cognate with Icelandic maki (spouse), Swedish make (spouse, husband), Danish mage (companion, fellow, mate). See also match.

Noun

make (plural makes)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) Mate; a spouse or companion; a match.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.vii:
      Th’Elfe therewith astownd, / Vpstarted lightly from his looser make, / And his vnready weapons gan in hand to take.
    • 1678 (later reprinted: 1855), John Ray, A Hand-book of Proverbs:
      Every cake hath its make; but a scrape cake hath two.

Etymology 3

Origin uncertain.

Alternative forms

  • meck (Scotland)

Noun

make (plural makes)

  1. (Scotland, Ireland, Northern England, now rare) A halfpenny. [from 16th c.]
    • 1934, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Grey Granite, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), page 606:
      Only as he climbed the steps did he mind that he hadn’t even a meck upon him, and turned to jump off as the tram with a showd swung grinding down to the Harbour []

Etymology 4

Origin unclear.

Noun

make (plural makes)

  1. (East Anglia, Essex, obsolete) An agricultural tool resembling a scythe, used to cut (harvest) certain plants such as peas, reeds, or tares.
    • 1797, Arthur Young, General View of the Agriculture of the County of Suffolk: Drawn Up for the Consideration of the Board of Agriculture and Internal Improvement, page 73:
      Harvest.—When left for seed, they are cut and wadded as pease, with a make.
      Produce.—From three to six sacks an acre.
    • 1811, William Gooch, General view of the agriculture of the county of Cambridge; drawn up for the consideration of the Board of Agriculture and Internal Improvement, page 142, section VI “Pease”:
      Harvest. Taken up by a pease-make, and left in small heaps, and turned as often as the weather may make it necessary.

References

  • make at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • make in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • kame, meak

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaːkə/

Verb

make

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of maken

Hawaiian

Etymology

From Proto-Polynesian *mate, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *m-atay, *atay, from Proto-Austronesian *m-aCay, *aCay (compare Cebuano matay, Chamorro matai, Fijian mate,, Ilocano matay, Indonesian mati, Javanese mati, Kapampangan mate, mete, Malagasy maty, Maori mate, Rapa Nui mate, Tagalog matay, Tahitian mate)

Noun

make

  1. death
  2. peril

Verb

make

  1. (stative) to die; dead
  2. (stative) to faint

Japanese

Romanization

make

  1. Rōmaji transcription of まけ

Middle English

Verb

make

  1. Alternative form of maken

Moore

Etymology

Compare Farefare makɛ

Pronunciation

/má.kè/

Verb

make

  1. to measure, to weigh
  2. to compare oneself with

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse maki

Noun

make m (definite singular maken, indefinite plural maker, definite plural makene)

  1. a mate (especially animals and birds), a spouse
  2. an equal, match, peer
  3. one of a pair (e.g. shoe, sock)
  4. something that is similar or alike

Derived terms

  • ektemake
  • har du sett på maken

References

  • “make” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse maki

Noun

make m (definite singular maken, indefinite plural makar, definite plural makane)

  1. a mate (especially animals and birds), a spouse
  2. an equal, match, peer
  3. one of a pair (e.g. shoe, sock)
  4. something that is similar or alike

Derived terms

  • ektemake
  • har du sett på maken

References

  • “make” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swazi

Noun

máke 1a (plural bómáke 2a)

  1. my mother

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish maki, from Old Norse maki, from Proto-Germanic *makô. Doublet of maka.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑːˌkɛ/

Noun

make c

  1. (slightly archaistic or formal) a spouse, a husband, a married man (mostly referring to a specific relation)
    Hon hade inte sett sin make på hela dagen.

    She had not seen her husband all day.
    Makarna hade råkat ta in på samma hotell.

    The man and his wife happened to board at the same hotel.
  2. something alike (in quality)
    Ingen hade sett svärdets make.

    Nobody had seen a sword like this.

Declension

Synonyms

  • man

Antonyms

  • fru
  • hustru
  • maka

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