hit vs score what difference

what is difference between hit and score

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hĭt, IPA(key): /hɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English hitten (to hit, strike, make contact with), from Old English hittan (to meet with, come upon, fall in with), from Old Norse hitta (to strike, meet), from Proto-Germanic *hittijaną (to come upon, find), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂eyd- (to fall; fall upon; hit; cut; hew).

Cognate with Icelandic hitta (to meet), Danish hitte (to find), Latin caedō (to kill), Albanian qit (to hit, throw, pull out, release).

Verb

hit (third-person singular simple present hits, present participle hitting, simple past hit or (dialectal, obsolete) hat or (rare, dialectal) het, past participle hit or (archaic, rare, dialectal) hitten)

  1. (heading, physical) To strike.
    1. (transitive) To administer a blow to, directly or with a weapon or missile.
      • 1922-1927, Frank Harris, My Life and Loves
        He tried to hit me but I dodged the blow and went out to plot revenge.
      • 1934, Robert E. Howard, The Slugger’s Game
        I hunted him for half a hour, aiming to learn him to hit a man with a table-leg and then run, but I didn’t find him.
    2. (transitive) To come into contact with forcefully and suddenly.
      • a dozen apples, each of them near as large as a Bristol barrel, came tumbling about my ears; one of them hit me on the back as I chanced to stoop, and knocked me down flat on my face.
      • 1882, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Doctor Grimshawe’s Secret: A romance
        Meanwhile the street boys kept up a shower of mud balls, many of which hit the Doctor, while the rest were distributed upon his assailants.
    3. (intransitive) To strike against something.
      • If bodies be extension alone, [] how can they move and hit one against another?
    4. (transitive) To activate a button or key by pressing and releasing it.
    5. (transitive, slang) To kill a person, usually on the instructions of a third party.
      • 1973, Mario Puzo, Francis Ford Coppola, The Godfather Part II (screenplay, second draft)
        FREDO: Mikey, why would they ever hit poor old Frankie Five-Angels? I loved that ole sonuvabitch.
    6. (transitive, military) To attack, especially amphibiously.
  2. (transitive) To manage to touch (a target) in the right place.
    I hit the jackpot.
    Antonym: miss
  3. (transitive, colloquial) To switch on.
    Antonyms: cut, kill
    Somebody’s been here! Hit the lights!
  4. (transitive, colloquial) To briefly visit.
  5. (transitive, informal) To encounter an obstacle or other difficulty.
  6. (heading) To attain, to achieve.
    1. (transitive, informal) To reach or achieve.
      • 2012, August 1. Owen Gibson in Guardian Unlimited, London 2012: rowers Glover and Stanning win Team GB’s first gold medal:
        And her success with Glover, a product of the National Lottery-funded Sporting Giants talent identification programme, will also spark relief among British officials who were starting to fret a little about hitting their target of equalling fourth in the medal table from Beijing.
    2. (intransitive) To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, often by luck.
    3. To guess; to light upon or discover.
  7. (transitive) To affect negatively.
  8. (figuratively) To attack.
  9. (heading, games) To make a play.
    1. (transitive, card games) In blackjack, to deal a card to.
    2. (intransitive, baseball) To come up to bat.
    3. (backgammon) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; said of a single unprotected piece on a point.
  10. (transitive, computing, programming) To use; to connect to.
  11. (transitive, US, slang) To have sex with.
  12. (transitive, US, slang) To inhale an amount of smoke from a narcotic substance, particularly marijuana.
Synonyms
  • (administer a blow): beat, pelt, thump; see also Thesaurus:hit
  • (kill a person): bump off, do away with, whack; see also Thesaurus:kill
  • (attack): beset, fall upon, lay into; see also Thesaurus:attack
  • (have sex with): bang, ram, smash; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
  • (smoke marijuana): smoke up, toke
Antonyms
  • (manage to touch in the right place): miss
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

hit (plural hits)

  1. A blow; a punch; a striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything.
    • So he the fam’d Cilician fencer prais’d, / And, at each hit, with wonder seem’d amaz’d.
    The hit was very slight.
  2. Something very successful, such as a song, film, or video game, that receives widespread recognition and acclaim.
  3. An attack on a location, person or people.
  4. A collision of a projectile with the target.
    1. In the game of Battleship, a correct guess at where one’s opponent ship is.
  5. (computing, Internet) A match found by searching a computer system or search engine
  6. (Internet) A measured visit to a web site, a request for a single file from a web server.
    My site received twice as many hits after being listed in a search engine.
  7. An approximately correct answer in a test set.
  8. (baseball) The complete play, when the batter reaches base without the benefit of a walk, error, or fielder’s choice.
    The catcher got a hit to lead off the fifth.
  9. (colloquial) A dose of an illegal or addictive drug.
    Where am I going to get my next hit?
  10. A premeditated murder done for criminal or political purposes.
  11. (dated) A peculiarly apt expression or turn of thought; a phrase which hits the mark.
    a happy hit
  12. (backgammon) A move that throws one of the opponent’s men back to the entering point.
  13. (backgammon) A game won after the adversary has removed some of his men. It counts for less than a gammon.
Antonyms
  • (a punch): miss
  • (success): flop, turkey
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations

Adjective

hit (not comparable)

  1. Very successful.
    The band played their hit song to the delight of the fans.

Etymology 2

From Middle English hit (it), from Old English hit (it), from Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, here). Cognate with Dutch het (it). More at it. Note ‘it.

Pronoun

hit (subjective and objective hit, reflexive and intensive hitself, possessive adjective and noun hits)

  1. (dialectal) It.
    • 1922, Philip Gengembre Hubert, The Atlantic monthly, Volume 130:
      But how hit was to come about didn’t appear.
    • 1998, Nancy A. Walker, What’s so funny?: humor in American culture:
      Now, George, grease it good, an’ let hit slide down the hill hits own way.
Derived terms
  • hits
  • hitself

Anagrams

  • Thi, iht, ith, thi-

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

  • hüt, hüüd (Uri)

Etymology

From Old High German hiutu, from hiu +‎ tagu, a calque of Latin hodie. Cognate with German heute, Dutch heden.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɪt/

Adverb

hit

  1. (Alsatian) today

Catalan

Etymology

From English hit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hit/

Noun

hit m (plural hits)

  1. hit (something very successful)
    Synonym: èxit

References


Chamorro

Etymology

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(i-)kita, from Proto-Austronesian *(i-)kita. Doublet of ta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hit/

Pronoun

hit

  1. we, us (inclusive)

Usage notes

  • hit is used either as a subject of an intransitive verb or as an object of a transitive verb, while ta is used as a subject of a transitive verb.
  • In transitive clauses with an indefinite object, hit can be used as a subject.

See also

References

  • Donald M. Topping (1973) Chamorro Reference Grammar[6], Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.

Czech

Etymology

From English hit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɪt/

Noun

hit m

  1. hit (a success, especially in the entertainment industry)
    Synonym: šlágr

Danish

Etymology

From English hit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hit/, [ˈhid̥]

Noun

hit n (singular definite hittet, plural indefinite hit or hits)

  1. hit (something very successful)

Inflection

Further reading

  • “hit” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦɪt/
  • Hyphenation: hit
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English hit.

Noun

hit m (plural hits, diminutive hitje n)

  1. A hit song, a very popular and successful song.
  2. (by extension) A success, something popular and successful (especially in the entertainment industry).
Derived terms
  • feesthit
  • kersthit
  • zomerhit

Etymology 2

Shortening of Hitlander (Shetlander).

Noun

hit m (plural hitten, diminutive hitje n or hitske n)

  1. (dated) A Shetland pony.
  2. (dated, regional) Any pony or small horse.
Derived terms
  • daghit

Hungarian

Etymology

From hisz (to believe).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhit]
  • Rhymes: -it

Noun

hit (plural hitek)

  1. faith, belief
  2. (archaic) oath, word of honour (e.g. in hitves and hitet tesz)

Declension

Derived terms

(Expressions):

  • hitet tesz

Further reading

  • hit in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Lashi

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hit/

Adverb

hit

  1. here

Determiner

hit

  1. this

References

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[7], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Limburgish

Etymology

From Dutch hit, from English hit.

Noun

hit f

  1. (slang, Dutch) something popular (book, song, band, country)

Usage notes

Slang. Mainly used when speaking Dutch, rather than in real Limburgish. Overall speaking, Limburgish is more conservative, therefore slaag is more often used.

Inflection

  • Dative and accusative are nowadays obsolete, use nominative instead.
  • The dative got out of use around 1900. As this is a recent loanword, there is no conjugation for it to be found.

Middle Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɪt/

Pronoun

hit

  1. Alternative form of het

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • hyt, hitt, hitte, hytte, it, yt, itt, jt, itte

Etymology

From Old English hit, from Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, here).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hit/, /it/

Pronoun

hit (accusative hit, genitive hit, his, possessive determiner hit, his)

  1. Third-person singular neuter pronoun: it
  2. Sometimes used in reference to a child or man: he, she
  3. Third-person singular neuter accusative pronoun: it
  4. Third-person singular neuter genitive pronoun: its
  5. (impersonal, placeholder) Third-person singular impersonal placeholder pronoun: it

Descendants

  • English: it
  • Scots: hid

See also

Determiner

hit (nominative pronoun hit)

  1. Third-person singular neuter possessive determiner: it

References

  • “hit, pron.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 27 May 2018.

Min Nan


Norwegian Bokmål

Adverb

hit

  1. here (to this place)

References

  • “hit” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hiːt/

Adverb

hit

  1. here (to this place)

References

  • “hit” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *hit.

Pronoun

hit

  1. it

Alternative forms

  • it

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: het
    • Dutch: het (only the pronoun; the definite article is a weakened form of dat)
    • Limburgish: hèt

Further reading

  • “hit”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English

Alternative forms

  • hitt

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, here). Cognate with Old Frisian hit (it), Old High German iz (it), Gothic ???????????????? (hita, it). More at .

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xit/, [hit]

Pronoun

hit n (accusative hit, genitive his, dative him)

  1. it

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: hit, hyt, hitt, hitte, hytte, it, yt, itt, jt, itte
    • English: it
    • Scots: hid

Old Norse

Etymology

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Article

hit

  1. neuter nominative/accusative singular of hinn

Declension


Polish

Etymology

From English hit, from Middle English hitten, from Old English hittan, from Old Norse hitta, from Proto-Germanic *hittijaną, from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂eyd-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xʲit/

Noun

hit m inan

  1. hit (a success, especially in the entertainment industry)

Declension

Further reading

  • hit in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • hit in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From English hit.

Noun

hit m (plural hits)

  1. hit (success, especially in the entertainment industry)
    Synonym: sucesso

Further reading

  • “hit” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish

Etymology

From English hit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxit/, [ˈxit̪]

Noun

hit m (plural hits)

  1. hit (success)
    Synonym: éxito

Swedish

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish hit, from *+at.

  • , from Proto-Indo-European *kei- (as in Ancient Greek ἐκεῖ (ekeî))
  • at, from Proto-Germanic *at, from Proto-Indo-European *ád (as in Swedish åt)

Composed in a similar way: Icelandic hegat and hingað.

Pronunciation

Adverb

hit (not comparable)

  1. here; to this place, hither
Antonyms
  • dit
Related terms
  • hitåt
See also
  • hit och dit
  • här

Etymology 2

From English hit.

Noun

hit c

  1. (informal) hit; something very popular. (A book, a movie, a song, …)


English

Etymology

From Middle English score, skore, schore, from Old English scoru (notch; tally; score), from Old Norse skor, from Proto-Germanic *skurō (incision; tear; rift), which is related to *skeraną (to cut).

Cognate with Icelandic skora, Swedish skåra, Danish skår. Related to shear.
(For twenty: The mark on a tally made by drovers for every twenty beasts passing through a tollgate.)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: skôr, IPA(key): /skɔː/
  • (General American) enPR: skôrʹ, IPA(key): /skɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: skōrʹ, IPA(key): /sko(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /skoə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)

Noun

score (plural scores)

  1. The total number of goals, points, runs, etc. earned by a participant in a game.
  2. The number of points accrued by each of the participants in a game, expressed as a ratio or a series of numbers.
  3. The performance of an individual or group on an examination or test, expressed by a number, letter, or other symbol; a grade.
  4. Twenty, 20.
  5. (gambling) An amount of money won in gambling; winnings.
    • 2013, Arnold Snyder, Big Book of Blackjack
      Use a few “introductory plays” to become known to a casino before you go for a big score.
  6. A distance of twenty yards, in ancient archery and gunnery.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  7. A weight of twenty pounds.
  8. (music) The written form of a musical composition showing all instrumental and vocal parts below each other.
  9. (music) The music of a movie or play.
  10. Subject.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 245e.
      Well, although we haven’t discussed the views of all those who make precise reckonings of being and not [being], we’ve done enough on that score.
  11. Account; reason; motive; sake; behalf.
    • But left the trade, as many more / Have lately done on the same score.
    • 1665, John Dryden, The Indian Emperour
      You act your kindness on Cydria’s score.
  12. A notch or incision; especially, one that is made as a tally mark; hence, a mark, or line, made for the purpose of account.
  13. An account or reckoning; account of dues; bill; debt.
  14. (US, crime, slang) a criminal act, especially:
    1. A robbery.
    2. A bribe paid to a police officer.
    3. An illegal sale, especially of drugs.
    4. A prostitute’s client.
  15. (US, vulgar, slang) A sexual conquest.

Usage notes

As a quantity, a score is counted as any other unit: ten score, twelve score, fourteen score, etc. (or tenscore, twelvescore). There is no word for 202; rather, twenty score is used, and twice that forty score.

Synonyms

  • (prostitute’s client): see Thesaurus:prostitute’s client

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

score (third-person singular simple present scores, present participle scoring, simple past and past participle scored)

  1. (transitive) To cut a notch or a groove in a surface.
  2. (intransitive) To record the tally of points for a game, a match, or an examination.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To obtain something desired.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 50
      “Of course it would be hypocritical for me to pretend that I regret what Abraham did. After all, I’ve scored by it.”
    1. To earn points in a game.
    2. To achieve (a score) in e.g. a test.
      • 2004, Diane McGuinness, Early reading instruction: what science really tells us about how to teach reading
        At the end of first grade, the children scored 80 percent correct on this test, a value that remained unchanged through third grade.
    3. (gambling) To win money by gambling.
      • 2005, Shannon Nash, For the Love of Money (page 215)
        [] he scored big by hitting the jack pot at the Bellagio (he won $7,000). The next day, he won $15,000 on the nickel machines at the Palm Casino!
    4. (slang) To acquire or gain.
    5. (US, crime, slang, of a police officer) To extract a bribe.
    6. (vulgar, slang) To obtain a sexual favor.
  4. (transitive) To provide (a film, etc.) with a musical score.
    • 1974, New York Magazine (volume 7, number 45, page 98)
      Godfather II is nothing like ready. It is not yet scored, and thus not mixed. There remain additional shooting, looping, editing.

Synonyms

  • (to cut a groove in a surface): groove, notch
  • (to record the score): keep, score, tally
  • (to earn points in a game):
  • (to achieve a score in a test):
  • (to acquire or gain): come by, earn, obtain; see also Thesaurus:receive
  • (to extract a bribe): shake down
  • (to obtain a sexual favor): pull
  • (to provide with a musical score): soundtrack

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Irish: scóráil

Translations

Interjection

score!

  1. (US, slang) Acknowledgement of success

See also

  • grade

References

  • Tom Dalzell, The Routledge Dictionary of Modern American Slang and Unconventional English, 2008, page 846

Anagrams

  • Corse, Crose, ROCEs, Secor, Sorce, ceros, cores, corse, creos, ocres

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English score.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skoːrə/, [ˈsɡ̊oːɐ]

Noun

score c (singular definite scoren, plural indefinite scorer)

  1. A score, a number of points earned.

Declension

Verb

score

  1. score a goal/point
  2. land (to acquire; to secure)
  3. (slang) steal
  4. persuade (someone) to have sex with oneself [from 1959]

Conjugation

Derived terms


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English score.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈskoː.rə/
  • Hyphenation: sco‧re

Noun

score m (plural scores, diminutive scoretje n)

  1. score (number of points earned)

Derived terms

  • scorebord

Related terms

  • scoren

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English score.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skɔʁ/

Noun

score m (plural scores)

  1. score (in a sport, game)

Derived terms

  • scorer

Further reading

  • “score” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • corse, Corse
  • ocres

Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • (of noun) skår
  • (of verb) skåre

Etymology

Via English score, from Old Norse skor. Related to Old Norse skera (modern Norwegian Bokmål skjære).

Noun

score m (definite singular scoren, indefinite plural scorer, definite plural scorene)

  1. a score

Verb

score (imperative scor, present tense scorer, passive scores, simple past and past participle scora or scoret, present participle scorende)

  1. to score (earn points in a game)

Derived terms

  • scorer
  • scoring
  • scoringsposisjon
  • scoringssjanse

References

  • “score” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “score” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • (of noun) skår
  • (of verb) skåre, skåra
  • (of verb) scora

Etymology

Borrowed from English score. Doublet of skòr.

Noun

score m (definite singular scoren, indefinite plural scorar, definite plural scorane)

  1. a score

Verb

score (present tense scorar, past tense scora, past participle scora, passive infinitive scorast, present participle scorande, imperative scor)

  1. to score (earn points in a game)

References

  • “score” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Etymology

From English score.

Noun

score m (plural scores)

  1. (sports) score

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