hitch vs preventative what difference

what is difference between hitch and preventative

English

Etymology

Probably from Middle English hicchen, hytchen, icchen (to move; to move as with a jerk), of obscure origin. Lacks cognates in other languages. Compare itch, hike.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɪtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪtʃ

Noun

hitch (plural hitches)

  1. A sudden pull.
  2. Any of various knots used to attach a rope to an object other than another rope.
  3. A fastener or connection point, as for a trailer.
  4. (informal) A problem, delay or source of difficulty.
  5. A hidden or unfavorable condition or element.
    Synonym: catch
  6. (military, slang) A period of time spent in the military.
    • 2004, June 3, Stephen J. Hedges & Mike Dorning, Chicago Tribune; Orlando Sentinel; page pg. A.1
      U.S. TROOPS FACE LONGER ARMY HITCH; SOLDIERS BOUND FOR IRAQ, … WILL BE RETAINED

Hyponyms

  • Magnus hitch
  • midshipman’s hitch
  • rigger’s hitch
  • rolling hitch
  • taut-line hitch
  • tent-line hitch

Translations

Verb

hitch (third-person singular simple present hitches, present participle hitching, simple past and past participle hitched)

  1. (transitive) To pull with a jerk.
  2. (transitive) To attach, tie or fasten.
    Synonyms: affix, join, put together; see also Thesaurus:join
  3. (informal) To marry oneself to; especially to get hitched.
    Synonyms: splice, wed; see also Thesaurus:marry
  4. (informal, transitive) Clipping of hitchhike, to thumb a ride.
  5. (intransitive) To become entangled or caught; to be linked or yoked; to unite; to cling.
    • atoms [] which at length hitched together
  6. (intransitive) To move interruptedly or with halts, jerks, or steps; said of something obstructed or impeded.
    • To ease themselves [] by hitching into another place.
  7. (Britain) To strike the legs together in going, as horses; to interfere.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Translations

Derived terms

  • hitch one’s wagon to a star
  • unhitch
  • unhitched

Further reading

  • hitch on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • List of hitch knots on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References



English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɹɪˈvɛntətɪv/

Adjective

preventative (comparative more preventative, superlative most preventative)

  1. Alternative form of preventive
    • 1920, Lillien Jane Martin, Mental hygiene: two years’ experience of a clinical psychologist, Warwick &York (1920), p. 78,
      “That part of mental hygiene which has a prophylactic character falls into two classes, group preventative mental hygiene […]”
    • 1968, G. Anthony Wedge, N. A. P.: New American Party, Geddes Press Printers (1968), p. 155,
      Preventative defense comes in two flavors […]”
    • 2006, Robert Thompson and Barbara Fritchman Thompson, Repairing & Upgrading Your PC, O’Reilly (2006), p. 70,
      “The goals of preventative maintenance are to reduce the likelihood of hardware failures, […]”

Noun

preventative (plural preventatives)

  1. Alternative form of preventive

Usage notes

  • Preventative is in all senses interchangeable with preventive. Even so, many speakers prefer to use preventative in noun senses and preventive in adjective senses.[1]

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