hoar vs rime what difference

what is difference between hoar and rime

English

Etymology

From Middle English hor, hore, from Old English hār (hoar, hoary, grey, old), from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ḱeh₃- (grey, dark). Cognate with German hehr (noble, sublime), Herr (sir, gentleman), Scottish Gaelic ciar (dusky), and Russian се́рый (séryj, grey).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: , IPA(key): /hɔː/
  • (General American) enPR: hôr, IPA(key): /hɔɹ/ *
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: hōr, IPA(key): /ho(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /hoə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophone: whore

Noun

hoar

  1. A white or greyish-white colour.
  2. Hoariness; antiquity.

Synonyms

  • (hoariness): agedness, ancientness, oldhood; see also Thesaurus:oldness

Translations

Adjective

hoar (not comparable)

  1. Of a white or greyish-white colour.
  2. (poetic) Hoarily bearded.
    • 1751, Thomas Warton, Newmarket, a Satire
      And lo, where rapt in beauty’s heavenly dream
      Hoar Plato walks his olived Academe.
    • 1847, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Evangeline, A Tale of Acadie
      This is the forest primeval. The murmuring pines and the hemlocks,
      Bearded with moss, and in garments green, indistinct in the twilight,
      Stand like Druids of eld, with voices sad and prophetic,
      Stand like harpers hoar, with beards that rest on their bosoms.
  3. (obsolete) Musty; mouldy; stale.
    • 1593, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, II. iv. 134:
      But a hare that is hoar / Is too much for a score / When it hoars ere it be spent.

Derived terms

  • hoarfrost
  • hoary
  • hoared

Related terms

  • haar
  • horehound

Verb

hoar (third-person singular simple present hoars, present participle hoaring, simple past and past participle hoared)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To become mouldy or musty.
    • 1593, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, II. iv. 136:
      But a hare that is hoar / Is too much for a score / When it hoars ere it be spent.

See also

  • Appendix:Colors

Anagrams

  • Haro, Hora, ROAH, haor, haro, hora, oh ar

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

  • Härre, haar, hoor, hàre

Etymology

From Old High German hār, from Proto-Germanic *hērą. Compare German Haar, Dutch haar, English hair, Swedish hår.

Noun

hoar n

  1. (Gressoney, anatomy) hair (the long hair on a person’s head)

References

  • “hoar” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Swedish

Noun

hoar

  1. indefinite plural of ho

Verb

hoar

  1. present tense of hoa.

Anagrams

  • hora


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: rīm, IPA(key): /ɹaɪm/
  • Rhymes: -aɪm
  • Homophone: rhyme

Etymology 1

From Middle English rime, ryme, rim, from Old English hrīm, from Proto-Germanic *hrīmaz, *hrīmą (hoarfrost), from Proto-Indo-European *krey- (to streak; graze; touch). Cognate with Dutch rijm (hoarfrost), dialectal Bavarian Reim (light frost, fow, dew), Danish rim (hoarfrost), Norwegian rim (hoarfrost).

Noun

rime (countable and uncountable, plural rimes)

  1. (meteorology) Ice formed by the rapid freezing of cold water droplets of fog on to a cold surface.
    Synonyms: hoarfrost, frost
  2. (meteorology) A coating or sheet of ice so formed.
  3. A film or slimy coating.
Derived terms
  • rimy
Translations

Verb

rime (third-person singular simple present rimes, present participle riming, simple past and past participle rimed)

  1. To freeze or congeal into hoarfrost.

Etymology 2

From Middle English rime, from Old English rīm (number; the precise sum or aggregation of any collection of individual things or persons), from Proto-Germanic *rīmą (calculation, number), from Proto-Indo-European *rēy- (to regulate, count). Influenced in meaning by Old French rime from the same Germanic source.

Alternative forms

  • rhyme

Noun

rime (plural rimes)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal) Number.
  2. (archaic except in direct borrowings from French) Rhyme.
    • 1846, Walter Savage Landor, poem
      But there are accents sweeter far When Love leaps down our evening star ,
      Holds back the blighting wings of Time,
      Melts with his breath the crusty rime
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in the 18th century.
  3. (linguistics) The second part of a syllable, from the vowel on, as opposed to the onset.
    Coordinate term: onset
    Meronyms: nucleus, coda
Translations

Verb

rime (third-person singular simple present rimes, present participle riming, simple past and past participle rimed)

  1. Obsolete form of rhyme.

Etymology 3

Unknown

Noun

rime (plural rimes)

  1. A step of a ladder; a rung.

Etymology 4

Latin rima.

Noun

rime (plural rimes)

  1. A rent or long aperture; a chink; a fissure; a crack.

Further reading

  • rime on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • SIL Glossary of Linguistic Terms

Anagrams

  • IMer, Meir, Meri, Mire, Remi, emir, meri, mire, reim, riem

Danish

Etymology

Through Old French from Medieval Latin rithmus, rhythmus.

Verb

rime (imperative rim, infinitive at rime, present tense rimer, past tense rimede, perfect tense rimet)

  1. to rhyme

References

  • “rime” in Den Danske Ordbog

French

Etymology

From Old French rime, from Vulgar Latin *rimare, from Frankish *rīm or Old High German rīm (series, row, number), from Proto-Germanic *rīmą. Akin to Old English rīm (row, series, number).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁim/
  • Rhymes: -im

Noun

rime f (plural rimes)

  1. rhyme

Derived terms

  • rime riche

Verb

rime

  1. inflection of rimer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

  • “rime” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • émir, mire, miré, Remi, Rémi

Italian

Noun

rime f

  1. plural of rima

Anagrams

  • ermi, meri, mire, remi

Middle Dutch

Etymology

Through Old French from Medieval Latin rithmus, rhythmus.

Noun

rime m or f

  1. line of poetry, verse
  2. rhyme

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: rijm

Further reading

  • “rime (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “rime (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

Middle English

Etymology

From Old English rīm (number).

Noun

rime (plural rimes)

  1. number
    Þatt full wel iss bitacnedd Þurrh tale & rime off fowwerrtiȝ, Off fowwerr siþe tene. — Ormulum, c1200
    (That full well is betokened thru tale and the number of forty, of four times ten.)

Related terms

  • rimen (verb)

Descendants

  • English: rhyme

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /riː.me/, [ˈɾiː.mə]

Etymology 1

From the noun rim, from Old Norse rím, from French rime

Verb

rime (imperative rim, present tense rimer, simple past rimte or rimet or rima, past participle rimt or rima)

  1. to rhyme
  2. to match, line up

Etymology 2

From rim, from Old Norse hrím

Verb

rime (imperative rim, present tense rimer, simple past rimet or rima, past participle rimt or rima)

  1. to rime

References

“rime” in The Bokmål Dictionary.


Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /riː.me/, [ˈɾiː.mə]

Alternative forms

  • (of the verbs) rima

Etymology 1

From rim, from Old Norse rím, from French rime

Verb

rime (imperative rim, present tense rimar, simple past rima, past participle rima)

  1. to rhyme
  2. to match, line up

Etymology 2

From rim, from Old Norse hrím

Verb

rime (imperative rim, present tense rimar, simple past rima, past participle rima)

  1. to rime

Etymology 3

From Old Norse rimi

Noun

rime

  1. an elongated row of hills or low mountains
Synonyms
  • høgdedrag (Bokmål also)
  • jordrygg (Bokmål also)
  • rinde

References

“rime” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


Old French

Etymology

From Medieval Latin rithmus, rhythmus

Noun

rime f (oblique plural rimes, nominative singular rime, nominative plural rimes)

  1. story; tale; account

Synonyms

  • conte, cunte

Descendants

  • (influenced) English: rhyme
  • French: rime
  • Italian: rima
  • Middle English: ryme, rime

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈʁi.mi/

Verb

rime

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of rimar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of rimar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of rimar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of rimar

Spanish

Verb

rime

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of rimar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of rimar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of rimar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of rimar.

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