hob vs pixie what difference

what is difference between hob and pixie

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: hŏb, IPA(key): /hɑb/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hŏb, IPA(key): /hɒb/
  • Rhymes: -ɒb

Etymology 1

Related to hub, but the ultimate origin of both words is obscure.

Noun

hob (plural hobs)

  1. A kind of cutting tool, used to cut the teeth of a gear.
  2. (historical) The flat projection or iron shelf at the side of a fire grate, where things are put to be kept warm.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smart to this entry?)
    • 1898, Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, Book the Second, Chapter V (The Jackal):
      They went into a dingy room lined with books and littered with papers, where there was a blazing fire. A kettle steamed upon the hob, and in the midst of the wreck of papers a table shone, with plenty of wine upon it, and brandy, and rum, and sugar, and lemons.
  3. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) The top cooking surface on a cooker; a cooktop. It typically comprises several cooking elements (often four), also known as ‘rings’.
    • 1913, Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 2
      And the first sound in the house was the bang, bang of the poker against the raker, as Morel smashed the remainder of the coal to make the kettle, which was filled and left on the hob, finally boil.
  4. A rounded peg used as a target in several games, especially in quoits.
  5. A male ferret.
  6. The hub of a wheel.
    • August 31 1776, George Washington, letter to the President of Congress
      the wheels of the carriages sinking up to the hobs rendered it impossible for our whole force to drag them.
Synonyms
  • (cooking surface): cooktop, stovetop
Translations

Verb

hob (third-person singular simple present hobs, present participle hobbing, simple past and past participle hobbed)

  1. (transitive) To create (a gear) by cutting with a hob.
  2. (intransitive) To engage in the process of cutting gears with a hob.

Etymology 2

From Middle English Hob (a diminutive of Robin, an Old French [Term?] diminutive of Robert), through its connection with Robin Goodfellow and (later) the devil. Compare hobgoblin; see robin.

Noun

hob (plural hobs)

  1. (obsolete) A fairy; a sprite; an elf; a bogey.
    • From elves, hobs, and fairies, [] Defend us, good Heaven!
  2. (obsolete) A countryman; a rustic or yokel.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Nares to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (supernatural creature): See goblin (hostile)
Derived terms
  • play hob with, raise hob

References

  • hob in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • BHO, BOH, HBO, boh

Danish

Etymology

From Old Danish hob, from Middle Low German hōp, from Old Saxon hōp, from Proto-West Germanic *haup (heap), cognate with English heap. Late Old Norse hópr and Swedish hop are also borrowed from Low German.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hoːˀb/, [ˈhoˀb̥]

Noun

hob c (singular definite hoben, plural indefinite hobe)

  1. crowd, multitude (a large amount of people or animals)
  2. (derogatory) common people
  3. heap
  4. (computer science) heap

Inflection

Derived terms

  • galaksehob
  • hoben (crowd, heap, noun)
  • hobe (to heap, verb)
  • til hobe (together, adverb)

German

Pronunciation

Verb

hob

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of heben

Lower Sorbian

Preposition

hob (with accusative)

  1. Obsolete spelling of wob


English

Etymology

Uncertain; see Wikipedia.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈpɪksi/
  • Rhymes: -ɪksi
  • Hyphenation: pix‧ie

Noun

pixie (plural pixies)

  1. (mythology, fantasy literature, fairy tales) A playful sprite or elflike or fairy-like creature.
    Synonyms: brownie, fair, gnome, imp, sprite
    • 2005, Dan Keding, The Pixies’ Bed, Dan Keding, Amy Douglas (editors), English Folktales, page 98,
      Then she saw pixies — dozens and dozens of pixies — dancing and singing.
    • 2005, Kathryn Reyes, Mystery Door Manor and the Dragon Realm, page 72,
      When she looked around, Mary saw four pixies flying toward her. She had to jump out of the way to avoid being hit. Then the pixies turned around and attacked again.
    • 2007, Jeremy Phillips, The Wizardon Star, page 165,
      The servant that had raised him, an elderly pixie called Rolog, had died. On his deathbed he had called the young Captain to his side. Seeing the pixie dying had had no effect on him.
    • 2010, Sandra A. Filbin, The Enchanted World: A Tooth Fairy’s Tale, page 49,
      Tiffy froze as the two pixies looked directly into each other’s eyes.
      Then Tiffy raised her hand and said, “Hi, I’m Tiffy the Tooth Fairy.” Even though the other pixie lifted her hand too, she didn’t answer.
  2. (slang) A cute, petite woman with short hair.
    • 2006, Darnell Arnoult, Sufficient Grace, page 186,
      Then a pixie appears in the visitor window, round face, big brown eyes framed in thick liner, a tiny turned-up nose, red lips, inch-long blue-black hair so popular with the avant-garde.
    • 2009, Nicole Baart, The Moment Between, page 1,
      Petite and narrow-waisted, with a pixie flip of hair the exact color of coffee beans, Abigail could easily pass for sixteen in a pair of ripped jeans and an Abercrombie T-shirt.
    • 2010, Mary Jo Ignoffo, Captive of the Labyrinth: Sarah L. Winchester, Heiress to the Rifle Fortune, page 196,
      Petite in the extreme, not even reaching five feet tall, Winchester at her most robust had approached one hundred pounds. No longer the bright-eyed, sophisticated pixie that Isaiah Taber had photographed so many years earlier, Winchester showed a different picture altogether as she lay dying, her fingers and toes knotted and knurled from years of destruction by the painful arthritis.
    • 2011, L. E. Newell, Durty South Grind, page 138,
      Like magic, Carla transformed from the dainty pixie into a hardcore, no-nonsense businesswoman right before his eyes.
  3. (astronomy, meteorology) An upper-atmospheric optical phenomenon associated with thunderstorms, a short-lasting pinpoint of light on the surface of convective domes that produces a gnome.

Alternative forms

  • pigsie (obsolete, Celtic mythology)
  • piskie
  • pisky
  • pixy

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • pixie on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Dongxiang

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʰiˈɕi̯ə/, [pɸi̥ˈɕi̯ɛ]

Etymology

From Proto-Mongolic *büse. Compare Mongolian бүс (büs)

Alternative forms

  • pijie

Noun

pixie

  1. belt

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