hobble vs hopple what difference

what is difference between hobble and hopple

English

Etymology

From Middle English hobblen, hobelen, akin to Middle Dutch hoblen, hobbelen (Modern Dutch hobbelen).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɒbəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɒbəl

Noun

hobble (plural hobbles)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) One of the short straps tied between the legs of unfenced horses, allowing them to wander short distances but preventing them from running off.
  2. An unsteady, off-balance step.
  3. (archaic, informal) A difficult situation; a scrape.
    • 1845, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, The Cock and Anchor
      “Saddle a horse—any horse—only let him be sure and fleet,” cried Ashwoode, “and I’ll pay you his price thrice over!”
      “Well, it’s a bargain,” replied the groom, promptly; “I don’t like to see a gentleman caught in a hobble, if I can help him out of it. []
  4. (dialect, Britain and Newfoundland) An odd job; a piece of casual work.

Synonyms

  • tether (rope)

Translations

Verb

hobble (third-person singular simple present hobbles, present participle hobbling, simple past and past participle hobbled)

  1. To fetter by tying the legs; to restrict (a horse) with hobbles.
    • 1865, Charles Dickens, Doctor Marigold
      you hobble your old horse and turn him grazing
  2. To walk lame, or unevenly.
    • The friar was hobbling the same way too.
  3. (figuratively) To move roughly or irregularly.
    • 1815, William Wordsworth, The White Doe of Rylstone
      The hobbling versification, the mean diction.
  4. To perplex; to embarrass.

Synonyms

  • (walk unevenly): hirple

Derived terms

  • hobble skirt
  • hobbly
  • unhobble

Translations

Anagrams

  • hobbel


English

Etymology

From hop; compare hobble.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɒpəl/

Noun

hopple (plural hopples)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) A fetter for horses or cattle when turned out to graze.

Verb

hopple (third-person singular simple present hopples, present participle hoppling, simple past and past participle hoppled)

  1. (transitive) To impede by a hopple; to tie the feet of (a horse or a cow) loosely together; to hobble.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To entangle; to hamper.
    • consider how we have such Faculties in us, as the Soul finds hoppled and fettered, clouded and obscured by her fatal residence in this prison of the Body

German

Pronunciation

Verb

hopple

  1. inflection of hoppeln:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

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