hokey vs maudlin what difference

what is difference between hokey and maudlin

English

Alternative forms

  • hokie, hoaky, hoky

Etymology

From the verb hoke (to give an artificial feel to), from hokum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhəʊki/
  • (US) IPA: /ˈhoʊki/
    Rhymes: -əʊki

Adjective

hokey (comparative hokier, superlative hokiest)

  1. (US, colloquial) phony, as if a hoax; noticeably contrived; of obviously flimsy credibility or quality
  2. (US, colloquial) corny; overly or unbelievably sentimental
    Synonyms: cheesy, kitschy

Related terms

  • hokiness
  • hoke
  • hokum

Translations

See also

  • Hokey Cokey
  • hokeypokey
  • hokey-tokey

Further reading

  • “hokey”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.


English

Etymology

From Middle English Maudelen, a dialectal form of Mary Magdalene (typically depicted weeping), from Old French Madelaine, from Late Latin Magdalena.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmɔːd.lɪn/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈmɔːd.lɪn/
    • (cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /ˈmɑːd.lɪn/

Noun

maudlin (plural maudlins)

  1. (obsolete, Christianity) The Magdalene; Mary Magdalene. [14th-16th c.]
    • c. 1400, Nicholas Love (trans.), The Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ:
  2. (historical) Either of two aromatic plants, costmary or sweet yarrow. [from 15th c.]
    • 1653, Nicholas Culpeper, The English Physician Enlarged, Folio Society 2007, p. 186:
  3. (obsolete) A Magdalene house; a brothel. [17th c.]

Adjective

maudlin (comparative more maudlin, superlative most maudlin)

  1. Affectionate or sentimental in an effusive, tearful, or foolish manner, especially because of drunkenness. [from 17th c.]
    Synonyms: mushy, sappy, schmaltzy, soupy, slushy; see also Thesaurus:drunk
    • c. 1900, O. Henry, The Rubaiyat of a Scotch Highball
  2. Extravagantly or excessively sentimental; mawkish, self-pitying. [from 17th c.]
    Synonyms: emotional, overwrought, soppy, larmoyant, mournful, plaintful, teary, weepy; see also Thesaurus:sad
    • 1961, CS Lewis, A Grief Observed
  3. (obsolete) Tearful, lachrymose. [17th-19th c.]

Translations

Anagrams

  • Mauldin, indlamu

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