hold vs take what difference

what is difference between hold and take

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hōld, IPA(key): /həʊld/, [həʊɫd]
  • (General American) enPR: hōld, IPA(key): /hoʊld/, [hoəɫd]
  • Homophone: holed
  • Rhymes: -əʊld

Etymology 1

From Middle English holden, from Old English healdan, from Proto-Germanic *haldaną (to tend, herd), maybe from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to drive) (compare Latin celer (quick), Tocharian B kälts (to goad, drive), Ancient Greek κέλλω (kéllō, to drive), Sanskrit कलयति (kaláyati, he impels)). Cognate to West Frisian hâlde, Low German holden, holen, Dutch houden, German halten, Danish and Norwegian Bokmål holde, Norwegian Nynorsk halda.

Verb

hold (third-person singular simple present holds, present participle holding, simple past held, past participle held or (archaic) holden)

  1. (transitive) To grasp or grip.
  2. (transitive) To contain or store.
  3. (heading) To maintain or keep to a position or state.
    1. (transitive) To have and keep possession of something.
    2. (transitive) To reserve.
    3. (transitive) To cause to wait or delay.
    4. (transitive) To detain.
    5. (intransitive, copulative) To be or remain valid; to apply (usually in the third person).
      • The rule holds in land as well as all other commodities.
    6. (intransitive, copulative) To keep oneself in a particular state.
    7. (transitive) To impose restraint upon; to limit in motion or action; to bind legally or morally; to confine; to restrain.
      • 1646, Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Death of Mr. Herrys
        Death! what do’st? O, hold thy blow.
    8. (transitive) To bear, carry, or manage.
    9. (intransitive, chiefly imperative) Not to move; to halt; to stop.
    10. (intransitive) Not to give way; not to part or become separated; to remain unbroken or unsubdued.
    11. To remain continent; to control an excretory bodily function.
  4. (heading) To maintain or keep to particular opinions, promises, actions.
    1. (transitive) To maintain, to consider, to opine.
      • 1776, Thomas Jefferson et al., United States Declaration of Independence:
        We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
    2. (transitive) To bind (someone) to a consequence of his or her actions.
    3. To maintain in being or action; to carry on; to prosecute, as a course of conduct or an argument; to continue; to sustain.
      • Hold not thy peace, and be not still.
    4. To accept, as an opinion; to be the adherent of, openly or privately; to persist in, as a purpose; to maintain; to sustain.
      • Stand fast and hold the traditions which ye have been taught.
    5. (archaic) To restrain oneself; to refrain; to hold back.
  5. (tennis, transitive, intransitive) To win one’s own service game.
  6. To take place, to occur.
    • 1824, James Hogg, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, Oxford 2010, p. 9:
      He came into the hall where the wedding-festival had held […].
  7. To organise an event or meeting (usually in passive voice).
  8. (archaic) To derive right or title.
    • 1665, John Dryden, The Indian Emperour
      My crown is absolute, and holds of none.
    • 1817, William Hazlitt, The Round Table
      His imagination holds immediately from nature.
  9. (imperative) In a food or drink order at an informal restaurant etc., requesting that a component normally included in that order be omitted.
  10. (slang, intransitive) To be in possession of illicit drugs for sale.
    • 1933, Goat Laven, Rough Stuff: The Life Story of a Gangster (page 122)
      [] first thing clients would say to me would be ‘Are you holding?’ I’d say yes if we had our supply and no if it was dangerous.
Synonyms
  • (grasp or grip): clasp, grasp, grip; See also Thesaurus:grasp
  • (have and keep possession of something): own; See also Thesaurus:possess
  • (not to move): See also Thesaurus:stop
  • (not to give way): See also Thesaurus:persevere
  • (restrain oneself): See also Thesaurus:desist
  • (take place): happen; See also Thesaurus:happen
Antonyms
  • release
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

hold (plural holds)

  1. A grasp or grip.
    Keep a firm hold on the handlebars.
  2. An act or instance of holding.
    Can I have a hold of the baby?
  3. A place where animals are held for safety
  4. An order that something is to be reserved or delayed, limiting or preventing how it can be dealt with.
    Senator X placed a hold on the bill, then went to the library and placed a hold on a book.
    • 2008, R. Michael Gordon, The Space Shuttle Program: How NASA Lost Its Way (page 98)
      Because there were no “launch commit criteria” regarding surface booster temperatures that might cause a hold on the launch, the ice team did not report the temperatures to the launch controllers.
  5. Something reserved or kept.
    We have a hold here for you.
  6. Power over someone or something.
  7. The ability to persist.
  8. The property of maintaining the shape of styled hair.
  9. (wrestling) A position or grip used to control the opponent.
    He got him in a tight hold and pinned him to the mat.
  10. (exercise) An exercise involving holding a position for a set time
  11. (gambling) The percentage the house wins on a gamble, the house or bookmaker’s hold.
    The House Hold on the game is 10,000, this is the amount of decision or risk the house wishes to assume.
  12. (gambling) The wager amount, the total hold.
    As of Monday night the total Melbourne Cup hold was $848,015
  13. (tennis) An instance of holding one’s service game, as opposed to being broken.
  14. The part of an object one is intended to grasp, or anything one can use for grasping with hands or feet.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      So I felt my way down the passage back to the vault, and recked not of the darkness, nor of Blackbeard and his crew, if only I could lay my lips to liquor. Thus I groped about the barrels till near the top of the stack my hand struck on the spile of a keg, and drawing it, I got my mouth to the hold.
  15. A fruit machine feature allowing one or more of the reels to remain fixed while the others spin.
  16. (video games, dated) A pause facility.
    • 1983, New Generation Software, Knot in 3D (video game instruction leaflet)
      A hold facility is available; H holds, and S restarts.
    • 1987?, Imagine Software, Legend of Kage (video game instruction leaflet)
      SCREEN 5 — Perhaps the toughest — going like the clappers sometimes works but generally you’ll have to be smarter than that. If things get a little too hectic and you don’t even have time to reach the HOLD key, try taking a short rest below the top of the stairs.
  17. The queueing system on telephones and similar communication systems which maintains a connection when all lines are busy.
    • 2003, Daniel Jackson, Paul Fulberg, Sonic Branding: An Essential Guide to the Art and Science of Sonic Branding, Palgrave Macmillan →ISBN, page 6
      Given that there is an average on-hold time of more than five minutes while enquiries are being dealt with, the telephone hold system provided the best opportunity.
    • 2005, Lorraine Grubbs-West, Lessons in Loyalty: How Southwest Airlines Does it : an Insider’s View, CornerStone Leadership Inst →ISBN, page 56
      Even the “on-hold” messages on Southwest’s telephone system are humorous, ensuring anyone inconvenienced by the hold is entertained.
    • 2012, Tanner Ezell, Cisco Unified Communications Manager 8: Expert Administration Cookbook, Packt Publishing Ltd →ISBN
      Note. After the device downloads its new configuration file, we can test placing a call on hold and the generic hold music will be heard.
  18. (baseball) A statistic awarded to a relief pitcher who is not still pitching at the end of the game and who records at least one out and maintains a lead for his team.
  19. (aviation) A region of airspace reserved for aircraft being kept in a holding pattern.
Synonyms

(exercise): isometric exercise

Derived terms
Translations

See also

  • behold

References

Etymology 2

Alteration (due to hold) of hole. Cognate with Dutch hol (hole, cave, den, cavity, cargo hold), Dutch holte (cavity, hollow, den).

Noun

hold (plural holds)

  1. (nautical, aviation) The cargo area of a ship or aircraft (often holds or cargo hold).
Derived terms
  • forehold
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English hold, holde, from Old English hold (gracious, friendly, kind, favorable, true, faithful, loyal, devout, acceptable, pleasant), from Proto-Germanic *hulþaz (favourable, gracious, loyal), from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to tend, incline, bend, tip). Cognate with German hold (gracious, friendly, sympathetic, grateful), Danish and Swedish huld (fair, kindly, gracious), Icelandic hollur (faithful, dedicated, loyal), German Huld (grace, favour).

Adjective

hold (comparative more hold, superlative most hold)

  1. (obsolete) Gracious; friendly; faithful; true.

Anagrams

  • dhol, hodl

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhʌlˀ]

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hald (grip, power, hold). Also see holde (to hold).

Noun

hold n (singular definite holdet, plural indefinite hold)

  1. team (group of persons working or playing together)
  2. class (group of students taught together)
  3. distance, side (only with the prepositions or fra and an adjective)
  4. truth
  5. pain (in the muscles)
  6. (rare) hold
Inflection

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

hold

  1. imperative of holde

German

Etymology

From Middle High German holt, from Old High German hold, from Proto-Germanic *hulþaz. Cognates include Gothic ???????????????????? (hulþs, clement) and Old Norse hollr ( > Danish huld).

Pronunciation

Adjective

hold (comparative holder, superlative am holdesten)

  1. (archaic, poetic) friendly, comely, graceful
    • 1907, Carl Spitteler, Die Mädchenfeinde, Siebentes Kapitel, Beim Narrenſtudenten
      • Um aber auf deinen holden Kadettengeneral zurückzukommen, ſo will ich dir, weil du mir dein Geheimnis anvertraut haſt, auch etwas Geheimnisvolles verraten […]

Declension

Further reading

  • “hold” in Duden online

Hungarian

Etymology

From Proto-Uralic *kuŋe. Cognates include Hungarian (month), Finnish and Estonian kuu.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhold]
  • Hyphenation: hold
  • Rhymes: -old

Noun

hold (plural holdak)

  1. moon, natural satellite
  2. unit of surface area, originally meant the same as acre, has different kinds ranging from 3500 m² to 8400 m²
  3. (attributive usage) lunar

Usage notes

Some astronomical and geographical terms have both a lowercase (common noun) and a capitalized (proper noun) form. For föld (ground, soil; Earth)―​Föld (Earth), hold (moon, satellite; Moon)―​Hold (our Moon), and nap (day; sun; Sun)―​Nap (our Sun), the lowercase forms are used in the everyday sense and the capitalized forms in the astronomical sense. In other similar pairs, the former refers to generic sense, and the latter specifies the best known referent: egyenlítő (equator)―​Egyenlítő (Equator), naprendszer (solar system)―​Naprendszer (Solar System), and tejút (galaxy, literally “milky way”, but galaxis and galaktika are more common)―​Tejút (Milky Way).[6][7][8]

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • (moon): hold in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (acre): hold in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse hold, from Proto-Germanic *huldą, from Proto-Indo-European *kol-, *kwol-. Cognate with Swedish hull.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [hɔlt]
  • Rhymes: -ɔlt

Noun

hold n (genitive singular holds, no plural)

  1. flesh
    • Isaiah 40 (Icelandic, English)
      Heyr, einhver segir: “Kalla þú!” Og ég svara: “Hvað skal ég kalla?” “Allt hold er gras og allur yndisleikur þess sem blóm vallarins. Grasið visnar, blómin fölna, þegar Drottinn andar á þau. Sannlega, mennirnir eru gras. Grasið visnar, blómin fölna, en orð Guðs vors stendur stöðugt eilíflega.”

      A voice says, “Cry out.” And I said, “What shall I cry?” “All flesh are like grass, and all their glory is like the flowers of the field. The grass withers and the flowers fall, because the breath of the LORD blows on them. Surely the people are grass. The grass withers and the flowers fall, but the word of our God stands forever.”

Declension


Middle English

Etymology

From Old English hold.

Adjective

hold

  1. friendly, faithful

Noun

hold

  1. carcase, flesh

Related terms

  • holdeste, unhold, holdelike, holdoþ

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

hold

  1. imperative of holde

Derived terms

  • (of noun) dyrehold
  • (of noun) kosthold
  • (of noun) husdyrhold

Old English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xold/, [hoɫd]

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *huldą, from Proto-Indo-European *kol-, *kwol-. Cognates include Old Norse hold (flesh) (Icelandic hold, Swedish hull), and (from Indo-European) Old Irish colainn, Welsh celain.

Noun

hold n (nominative plural hold)

  1. dead body; carcass
Declension

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *hulþaz, a variant on a root meaning ‘lean, incline’ (compare Old English heald, hieldan).

Cognates include Old Frisian hold, Old Saxon hold, Old High German hold (German hold), Old Norse hollr (Danish huld, Swedish huld), Gothic ???????????????????? (hulþs).

Adjective

hold (comparative holdra, superlative holdost) (+ dative)

  1. gracious, loyal, kind
Declension

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *hulþaz

Adjective

hold

  1. friendly , loyal

Derived terms

  • huldī
  • hulda, holda

Descendants

  • German: hold

Spanish

Noun

hold m (plural holds)

  1. (baseball) hold


English

Etymology

From Middle English taken (to take, lay hold of, grasp, strike), from Old English tacan (to grasp, touch), of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse taka (to touch, take), from Proto-Germanic *tēkaną (to touch), from Proto-Indo-European *deh₁g- (to touch). Gradually displaced Middle English nimen (“to take”; see nim), from Old English niman (to take). Cognate with Icelandic and Norwegian Nynorsk taka (to take), Norwegian Bokmål ta (to take), Swedish ta (to take), Danish tage (to take, seize), Middle Dutch taken (to grasp), Dutch taken (to take; grasp), Middle Low German tacken (to grasp). Compare tackle.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: tāk, IPA(key): /teɪk/, [tʰeɪ̯k]
  • Rhymes: -eɪk

Verb

take (third-person singular simple present takes, present participle taking, simple past took, past participle taken)

  1. (transitive) To get into one’s hands, possession, or control, with or without force.
    1. (transitive) To seize or capture.
    2. (transitive) To catch or get possession of (fish or game).
    3. (transitive, cricket) To catch the ball; especially as a wicket-keeper and after the batsman has missed or edged it.
    4. (transitive) To appropriate or transfer into one’s own possession, sometimes by physically carrying off.
    5. (transitive) To exact.
    6. (transitive) To capture or win (a piece or trick) in a game.
  2. (transitive) To receive or accept (something) (especially something given or bestowed, awarded, etc).
    • Ye shall take no satisfaction for the life of a murderer.
    1. (transitive) To receive or accept (something) as payment or compensation.
    2. (transitive) To accept and follow (advice, etc).
    3. (transitive) To receive into some relationship.
    4. (transitive, intransitive, law) To receive or acquire (property) by law (e.g. as an heir).
      • 1832, Lodge v Simonton, in Reports of Cases Adjudged in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, page 442:
        There was no intestacy, and they did not take under the will as heirs, []
      • 1913, Conrad v Conrad et al (Court of Appeals of Kentucky, Feb. 25, 1913), in The Southwestern Reporter, volumes 153-154, page 741:
        The only interest they have in the land arises under the will of E. J. Turnham, under which they take one half of the land.
  3. (transitive) To remove.
    1. (transitive) To remove or end by death; to kill.
    2. (transitive) To subtract.
  4. (transitive) To have sex with.
    • 1994, Pat Booth, Three Complete Novels, Wings Books, page 180:
      At others he would take her on the floor of her clothes closet and then leave her, locked in for the rest of the night, awash with his sex, until her embarrassed maid freed her the next morning.
    • 2014 July 3, Susan Calman, during Mock the Week, series 13, episode 4:
      And the queen takes the bishop… this is turning out to be quite the royal wedding!
  5. (transitive) To defeat (someone or something) in a fight.
  6. (transitive) To grasp or grip.
  7. (transitive) To select or choose; to pick.
    • Saul said, Cast lots between me and Jonathan my son. And Jonathan was taken.
  8. (transitive) To adopt (select) as one’s own.
  9. (transitive) To carry or lead (something or someone).
    1. (transitive, especially of a vehicle) To transport or carry; to convey to another place.
    2. (transitive, of a path, road, etc.) To lead (to a place); to serve as a means of reaching.
    3. (transitive) To pass (or attempt to pass) through or around.
    4. (transitive) To escort or conduct (a person).
      • 2002(?), J. R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
        They’re taking the Hobbits to Isengard!
    5. (reflexive) To go.
      • 2007, Edwin Mullins, The Popes of Avignon, Blue Bridge, 2008, page 59
        Nicholas then took himself to Avignon where in August 1330 he formally renounced his claim to the papacy.
  10. (transitive) To use as a means of transportation.
  11. (obsolete) To visit; to include in a course of travel.
    • c. 1677, William Penn, Travels in Holland and Germany
      Almost a year since, R. B. and B. F. took that city, in the way from Frederickstadt to Amsterdam, and gave them a visit.
    • 1827, Wesleyan Methodism in Manchester and its vicinity, volume 1, page 7:
      Mr. Clayton had not been long in his new situation, before Mr. Wasley tendered his personal respects to him; “For in May (1733), he set out for Epsworth, and took Manchster in his way to see him.”
  12. (transitive) To obtain for use by payment or lease.
    1. (transitive) To obtain or receive regularly by (paid) subscription.
  13. (transitive) To consume.
    1. (transitive) To receive (medicine) into one’s body, e.g. by inhalation or swallowing; to ingest.
    2. (transitive) To partake of (food or drink); to consume.
      • To such men as Mr. Hellyer, who every night take much strong drink, and on no occasion whatever take any exercise, sixty is the grand climacteric. He was, a year ago, just fifty-nine. Alas! he has not even reached his grand climacteric. Already he is gone. He was cut off by pneumonia, or apoplexy, last Christmas.
  14. (transitive) To experience, undergo, or endure.
    1. (transitive) To undergo; to put oneself into, to be subjected to.
    2. (transitive) To experience or feel.
    3. (transitive) To submit to; to endure (without ill humor, resentment, or physical failure).
    4. (transitive) To participate in.
    5. (transitive) To suffer, to endure (a hardship or damage).
  15. (transitive) To cause to change to a specified state or condition.
    He had to take it apart to fix it.
    She took down her opponent in two minutes.
  16. (transitive) To regard in a specified way.
  17. (transitive) To conclude or form (a decision or an opinion) in the mind.
  18. (transitive) To understand (especially in a specified way).
    • 1853, The American Journal of Science and Arts, page 125:
      The author explained the theory of Dove, which, if we took him correctly, was, that the lustre of bodies and particularly the metallic lustre arose from the light coming from the one stratum of the superficial particles of bodies interfering on the eye []
  19. (transitive) To accept or be given (rightly or wrongly); assume (especially as if by right).
  20. (transitive) To believe, to accept the statements of.
    • c. 1674-1718, Nicholas Rowe:
      I take thee at thy word.
  21. (transitive) To assume or suppose; to reckon; to regard or consider.
  22. (transitive) To draw, derive, or deduce (a meaning from something).
    • c. 1630-1694,, John Tillotson, Sermon V, The Excellency of the Christian Religion:
      And the firm belief of a future Judgment, which shall render to every man according to his deeds, if it be well consider’d, is to a reasonable nature the most forcible motive of all other to a good life; because it is taken from the consideration of the greatest and most lasting happiness and misery that human nature is capable of.
  23. (transitive) To derive (as a title); to obtain from a source.
  24. (transitive) To catch or contract (an illness, etc).
  25. (transitive) To come upon or catch (in a particular state or situation).
  26. (transitive) To captivate or charm; to gain or secure the interest or affection of.
    • Neither let her take thee with her eyelids.
    • 1688, William Wake, Preparation for Death
      Cleombroutus was so taken with this speculation, that [] he had not patience.
    • 1827, Thomas Moore, The Epicurean
      I know not why, but there was a something in those half-seen features, — a charm in the very shadow that hung over their imagined beauty, — which took my fancy more than all the outshining loveliness of her companions.
  27. (transitive, of a material) To absorb or be impregnated by (dye, ink, etc); to be susceptible to being treated by (polish, etc).
  28. (transitive, of a ship) To let in (water).
  29. (transitive) To require.
    • 1920, China Monthly Review 15, page 357:
      If the summary of the Tientsin society is accurate, a famine population of more than 14,000,000 is already bad enough. If it takes five dollars to keep one of them alive, []
    • 2009, Living It Out →ISBN:
      While it takes courage to come out, the acceptance of parents and other family members can really help the person coming out to accept themselves.
  30. (transitive) To proceed to fill.
  31. (transitive) To fill, to use up (time or space).
  32. (transitive) To avail oneself of.
  33. (transitive) To practice; perform; execute; carry out; do.
    • To such men as Mr. Hellyer, who every night take much strong drink, and on no occasion whatever take any exercise, sixty is the grand climacteric.
  34. (transitive) To assume or perform (a form or role).
    1. (transitive) To assume (a form).
    2. (transitive) To perform (a role).
    3. (transitive) To assume and undertake the duties of (a job, an office, etc).
  35. (transitive) To bind oneself by.
  36. (transitive) To move into.
  37. (transitive) To go into, through, or along.
  38. (transitive) To have and use one’s recourse to.
  39. (transitive) To ascertain or determine by measurement, examination or inquiry.
  40. (transitive) To write down; to get in, or as if in, writing.
  41. (transitive) To make (a photograph, film, or other reproduction of something).
  42. (transitive, dated) To take a picture, photograph, etc of (a person, scene, etc).
  43. (transitive) To obtain money from, especially by swindling.
  44. (transitive, now chiefly by enrolling in a class or course) To apply oneself to the study of.
  45. (transitive) To deal with.
  46. (transitive) To consider in a particular way, or to consider as an example.
  47. (transitive, baseball) To decline to swing at (a pitched ball); to refrain from hitting at, and allow to pass.
  48. (transitive) To accept as an input to a relation.
    1. (transitive, grammar) To have to be used with (a certain grammatical form, etc).
    2. (transitive, mathematics, computing) To accept (zero or more arguments).
  49. (intransitive) To get or accept (something) into one’s possession.
  50. (intransitive) To engage, take hold or have effect.
    1. (Of ink; dye; etc.) To adhere or be absorbed properly.
    2. (of a plant, etc) To begin to grow after being grafted or planted; to (literally or figuratively) take root, take hold.
      • 1884, Stephen Bleecker Luce, Text-book of Seamanship, page 179:
        The cradles are supported under their centres by shores, on which the keel takes.
    3. (of a mechanical device) To catch; to engage.
      • 2009, Sheldon Russell, The Yard Dog: A Mystery, page 210:
        At the depot, Hook climbed out, slamming the door twice before the latch took.
    4. (possibly dated) To win acceptance, favor or favorable reception; to charm people.
      • c. 1672-1719, Joseph Addison:
        Each wit may praise it for his own dear sake, / And hint he writ it, if the thing should take.
    5. To have the intended effect.
      • 1967, Richard Martin Stern, The Kessler Legacy, page 103:
        “When I was young,” I said, “I was vaccinated with religion, but the vaccination didn’t take.”
  51. (intransitive, copulative) To become; to be affected in a specified way.
  52. (intransitive, possibly dated) To be able to be accurately or beautifully photographed.
  53. (intransitive, dialectal, proscribed) An intensifier.
  54. (transitive, obsolete) To deliver, bring, give (something) to (someone).
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew 22.19:
      Jesus perceaved there wylynes, and sayde: Why tempte ye me ye ypocrytes? lett me se the tribute money. And they toke hym a peny.
  55. (transitive, obsolete outside dialects and slang) To give or deliver (a blow, to someone); to strike or hit.
Conjugation

Usage notes

  • In a few informal sociolects, took is sometimes replaced by the proscribed form taked.
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb take had the form takest, and had tookest for its past tense.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form taketh was used.

Quotations

  • 1686, John Dryden, To The Pious Memory of the Accomplish’d Young Lady Mrs. Anne Killigrew
    Beauty alone could beauty take so right.
  • 1973, Albert J. Reiss, The Police and the Public, page 44:
    A lot of officers when they knock off a still will take an axe to the barrels.

Synonyms

  • (to get into one’s possession): confiscate, seize; see also Thesaurus:take
  • (military: to gain a position by force): capture, conquer, seize
  • (to receive or accept something): garner, get, obtain, win; see also Thesaurus:receive
  • (to remove): knock off, subduct; see also Thesaurus:remove
  • (to kill): do in, off, terminate; see also Thesaurus:kill
  • (to subtract): take away; see also Thesaurus:subtract
  • (to have sex with): have, sleep with; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
  • (to defeat in a fight): beat
  • (to grasp with the hands): grab, grasp, grip, nim; see also Thesaurus:grasp
  • (to consume): ingest, swallow

Antonyms

  • (to accept): give
  • (to carry): bring
  • drop

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

take (plural takes)

  1. The or an act of taking.
    • 1999, Impacts of California sea lions and Pacific harbor seals […] (published by the United States National Marine Fisheries Service), page 32:
      The 1994 Amendments address the incidental take of marine mammals in the course of commercial fishing, not the direct lethal take of pinnipeds for management purposes.
  2. Something that is taken; a haul.
    1. Money that is taken in, (legal or illegal) proceeds, income; (in particular) profits.
      • 2018 November 27, Paul Krugman, “The Depravity of Climate-Change Denial”, The New York Times, page A22:
        Money is still the main answer: Almost all prominent climate deniers are on the fossil-fuel take.
    2. The or a quantity of fish, game animals or pelts, etc which have been taken at one time; catch.
  3. An interpretation or view, opinion or assessment; perspective.
  4. An approach, a (distinct) treatment.
  5. (film) A scene recorded (filmed) at one time, without an interruption or break; a recording of such a scene.
  6. (music) A recording of a musical performance made during an uninterrupted single recording period.
  7. A visible (facial) response to something, especially something unexpected; a facial gesture in response to an event.
  8. (medicine) An instance of successful inoculation/vaccination.
  9. (rugby, cricket) A catch of the ball (in cricket, especially one by the wicket-keeper).
  10. (printing) The quantity of copy given to a compositor at one time.
    • 1884, John Southward, Practical Printing: A Handbook of the Art of Typography (page 197)
      A take usually consists of a little more than a stickful of matter, but it varies sometimes, for if a new paragraph occurs it is not overlooked. These takes are carefully numbered, and a list is kept of the compositors who take the several pieces.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take
  • intake
  • outtake
  • spit take
  • taking, taking
  • uptake

References

Anagrams

  • Kate, kate, keta, teak

Japanese

Romanization

take

  1. Rōmaji transcription of たけ

Marshallese

Etymology

Borrowed from English turkey, named after Turkey, from Middle English Turkye, from French Turquie, Medieval Latin Turcia, from Turcus (Turk), from Byzantine Greek Τοῦρκος (Toûrkos), from Persian ترک(Turk), from Middle Persian twlk’ (Turk), from an Old Turkic autonym, Türk or Türük.

Pronunciation

  • (phonetic) IPA(key): [tˠɑɡe]
  • (phonemic) IPA(key): /tˠækej/
  • Bender phonemes: {takȩy}

Noun

take

  1. a turkey

References

  • Marshallese–English Online Dictionary

Mauritian Creole

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /take/

Etymology

From French taquet.

Noun

take

  1. power switch.

Middle English

Etymology 1

Verb

take (third-person singular simple present taketh, present participle takende, first-/third-person singular past indicative toke, past participle taken)

  1. Alternative form of taken

Verb

take

  1. Alternative form of taken: past participle of taken

Etymology 2

Noun

take (plural takes)

  1. Alternative form of tak (tack (small nail))

Etymology 3

Verb

take (third-person singular simple present taketh, present participle takende, takynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle taked)

  1. Alternative form of takken

Etymology 4

Noun

take (plural takes)

  1. Alternative form of tak (tack (fee paid to keep swine))

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

take (present tense tek, past tense tok, past participle teke, passive infinitive takast, present participle takande, imperative tak)

  1. Alternative form of taka

Pilagá

Verb

take

  1. want
    se-takeI want

References

  • 2001, Alejandra Vidal, quoted in Subordination in Native South-American Languages

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