hole vs hollow what difference

what is difference between hole and hollow

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /həʊl/, [həʊɫ], [hɒʊɫ]
  • Rhymes: -əʊl
  • (US) IPA(key): /hoʊl/, [hoʊɫ]
  • Rhymes: -əʊl
  • Homophone: whole

Etymology 1

From Middle English hole, hol, from Old English hol (orifice, hollow place, cavity), from Proto-West Germanic *hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulą (hollow space, cavity), noun derivative of Proto-Germanic *hulaz (hollow). Related to hollow.

Noun

hole (plural holes)

  1. A hollow place or cavity; an excavation; a pit; an opening in or through a solid body, a fabric, etc.; a perforation; a rent; a fissure.
    • The priest took a chest, and bored a hole in the lid.
    • 1840, Alfred Tennyson, Godiva:
      [] her palfrey’s footfall shot
      Light horrors thro’ her pulses: the blind walls
      Were full of chinks and holes; and overhead
      Fantastic gables, crowding, stared: []
    1. An opening in a solid.
  2. (heading) In games.
    1. (golf) A subsurface standard-size hole, also called cup, hitting the ball into which is the object of play. Each hole, of which there are usually eighteen as the standard on a full course, is located on a prepared surface, called the green, of a particular type grass.
    2. (golf) The part of a game in which a player attempts to hit the ball into one of the holes.
    3. (baseball) The rear portion of the defensive team between the shortstop and the third baseman.
    4. (chess) A square on the board, with some positional significance, that a player does not, and cannot in future, control with a friendly pawn.
    5. (stud poker) A card (also called a hole card) dealt face down thus unknown to all but its holder; the status in which such a card is.
    6. In the game of fives, part of the floor of the court between the step and the pepperbox.
  3. (archaeology, slang) An excavation pit or trench.
  4. (figuratively) A weakness; a flaw or ambiguity.
    • 2011, Fun – We Are Young
      But between the drinks and subtle things / The holes in my apologies, you know / I’m trying hard to take it back
  5. (informal) A container or receptacle.
  6. (physics) In semiconductors, a lack of an electron in an occupied band behaving like a positively charged particle.
  7. (computing) A security vulnerability in software which can be taken advantage of by an exploit.
  8. (slang, anatomy) An orifice, in particular the anus. When used with shut it always refers to the mouth.
  9. (Ireland, Scotland, particularly in the phrase “get one’s hole”) Sex, or a sex partner.
  10. (informal, with “the”) Solitary confinement, a high-security prison cell often used as punishment.
    Synonym: box
    • 2011, Ahmariah Jackson, IAtomic Seven, Locked Up but Not Locked Down
      Disciplinary actions can range from a mere write up to serious time in the hole.
  11. (slang) An undesirable place to live or visit; a hovel.
  12. (figuratively) Difficulty, in particular, debt.
  13. (graph theory) A chordless cycle in a graph.
  14. (slang, rail transport) A passing loop; a siding provided for trains traveling in opposite directions on a single-track line to pass each other.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:hole
  • (solitary confinement): administrative segregation, ad-seg, block (UK), box, cooler (UK), hotbox, lockdown, pound, SCU, security housing unit, SHU, special handling unit
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Japanese: ホール (hōru)
  • Sranan Tongo: olo
Translations

Verb

hole (third-person singular simple present holes, present participle holing, simple past and past participle holed)

  1. (transitive) To make holes in (an object or surface).
  2. (transitive, by extension) To destroy.
  3. (intransitive) To go into a hole.
  4. (transitive) To drive into a hole, as an animal, or a billiard ball or golf ball.
    • 1799, Sporting Magazine (volume 13, page 49)
      If the player holes the red ball, he scores three, and upon holing his adversary’s ball, he gains two; and thus it frequently happens, that seven are got upon a single stroke, by caramboling and holing both balls.
  5. (transitive) To cut, dig, or bore a hole or holes in.
    to hole a post for the insertion of rails or bars
Derived terms
  • holeable
  • holer
  • hole out
  • hole up
Translations

Etymology 2

Adjective

hole (comparative holer or more hole, superlative holest or most hole)

  1. Obsolete spelling of whole.
    • 1843, Sir George Webbe Dasent (translator), A grammar of the Icelandic or Old Norse tongue (originally by Rasmus Christian Rask)
      Such was the arrangement of the alphabet over the hole North.

Anagrams

  • Hoel, OHLE, helo, ohel, oleh

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦolɛ]

Noun

hole

  1. inflection of hůl:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Verb

hole

  1. masculine singular present transgressive of holit

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhoːlə/

Verb

hole

  1. inflection of holen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Hausa

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hóː.lèː/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [hóː.lèː]

Verb

hōlḕ (grade 4)

  1. to relax, to enjoy oneself

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hāl

Adjective

hole

  1. healthy
  2. safe
  3. whole, complete, full
Alternative forms
  • hol, ol, ole, hoal, hoale, hoel, hoil, hoille, holle, wholle
  • hal, hale, halle (Northern)
References
  • “hōl(e, adj.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Adverb

hole

  1. wholly
Alternative forms
  • hol
References
  • “hōl(e, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Noun

hole (plural holes)

  1. whole, entirety
  2. health
  3. remedy, cure
Alternative forms
  • hol
References
  • “hōl(e, n.(3).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Descendants

  • English: whole
  • Scots: hole, holl

Etymology 2

From Old English hol

Noun

hole (plural holes or holen)

  1. hole
Alternative forms
  • hol, ol, ole, holle, hoil, houl, hul
Descendants
  • English: hole
  • Scots: hole

References

  • “hō̆l(e, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 3

From Old English hulu; see hull for more.

Noun

hole (plural holes)

  1. hull (outer covering of a fruit or seed)
  2. hut, shelter
  3. hull (of a ship)
Alternative forms
  • hol, holle, hul, hule, ule, hulle, ulle, hoile, huole
Descendants
  • English: hull
  • Scots: huil

References

  • “hol(e, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 4

Verb

hole

  1. past participle of helen (to cover)
    Synonym: heled
Alternative forms
  • holn

Etymology 5

Adjective

hole

  1. Alternative form of hol (hollow)

Etymology 6

Noun

hole (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of oile (oil)

Etymology 7

Noun

hole (plural holen)

  1. Alternative form of oule (owl)

Etymology 8

Adjective

hole

  1. Alternative form of holy (holy)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse hola

Noun

hole f or m (definite singular hola or holen, indefinite plural holer, definite plural holene)

  1. alternative form of hule

References

  • “hole” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • hòle

Etymology

From Old Norse hola

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²hoːlə/

Noun

hole f (definite singular hola, indefinite plural holer, definite plural holene)

  1. a cave
  2. a cavity (anatomy)
  3. a den

Derived terms

  • augehole

References

  • “hole” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

From Middle High German holen, from Old High German holon, from Proto-West Germanic *holōn (to fetch). Compare German holen, Dutch halen. Related to English haul.

Verb

hole

  1. to fetch

Slovak

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦole]

Noun

hole f

  1. genitive singular of hoľa

Sotho

Noun

hole 17 (uncountable)

  1. far away

Yola

Verb

hole

  1. Alternative form of helt


English

Alternative forms

  • hallow
  • holler (nonstandard: dialectal, especially Southern US)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhɒl.əʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhɑ.loʊ/
    • (Southern American English, Appalachia) IPA(key): /hɑlɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒləʊ

Etymology 1

From Middle English holow, holowe, holwe, holwȝ, holgh, from Old English holh (a hollow), from Proto-Germanic *halhwaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱelḱwos. Cognate with Old High German huliwa and hulwa, Middle High German hülwe. Perhaps related to hole.

Noun

hollow (plural hollows)

  1. A small valley between mountains.
    • c. 1710–20, Matthew Prior, The First Hymn Of Callimachus: To Jupiter
      Forests grew upon the barren hollows.
  2. A sunken area or unfilled space in something solid; a cavity, natural or artificial.
  3. (figuratively) A feeling of emptiness.
  4. (US) A sunken area.
Translations

Verb

hollow (third-person singular simple present hollows, present participle hollowing, simple past and past participle hollowed)

  1. (transitive) to make a hole in something; to excavate

Etymology 2

From Middle English holowe, holwe, holuȝ, holgh, from the noun (see above).

Adjective

hollow (comparative hollower, superlative hollowest)

  1. (of something solid) Having an empty space or cavity inside.
    a hollow tree; a hollow sphere
  2. (of a sound) Distant, eerie; echoing, reverberating, as if in a hollow space; dull, muffled; often low-pitched.
    • 1903, George Gordon Byron, On Leaving Newstead Abbey
      Through thy battlements, Newstead, the hollow winds whistle:
  3. (figuratively) Without substance; having no real or significant worth; meaningless.
    a hollow victory
  4. (figuratively) Insincere, devoid of validity; specious.
    a hollow promise
  5. Concave; gaunt; sunken.
    • c. 1596-1599, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice
      To view with hollow eye and wrinkled brow
  6. (gymnastics) Pertaining to hollow body position
Derived terms
  • hollow leg
Translations

Adverb

hollow (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) Completely, as part of the phrase beat hollow or beat all hollow.

Etymology 3

Compare holler.

Verb

hollow (third-person singular simple present hollows, present participle hollowing, simple past and past participle hollowed)

  1. To call or urge by shouting; to hollo.
    • 1814. Sir Walter Scott, Waverley
      He has hollowed the hounds.

Interjection

hollow

  1. Alternative form of hollo

References

  • hollow in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

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