hole vs trap what difference

what is difference between hole and trap

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /həʊl/, [həʊɫ], [hɒʊɫ]
  • Rhymes: -əʊl
  • (US) IPA(key): /hoʊl/, [hoʊɫ]
  • Rhymes: -əʊl
  • Homophone: whole

Etymology 1

From Middle English hole, hol, from Old English hol (orifice, hollow place, cavity), from Proto-West Germanic *hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulą (hollow space, cavity), noun derivative of Proto-Germanic *hulaz (hollow). Related to hollow.

Noun

hole (plural holes)

  1. A hollow place or cavity; an excavation; a pit; an opening in or through a solid body, a fabric, etc.; a perforation; a rent; a fissure.
    • The priest took a chest, and bored a hole in the lid.
    • 1840, Alfred Tennyson, Godiva:
      [] her palfrey’s footfall shot
      Light horrors thro’ her pulses: the blind walls
      Were full of chinks and holes; and overhead
      Fantastic gables, crowding, stared: []
    1. An opening in a solid.
  2. (heading) In games.
    1. (golf) A subsurface standard-size hole, also called cup, hitting the ball into which is the object of play. Each hole, of which there are usually eighteen as the standard on a full course, is located on a prepared surface, called the green, of a particular type grass.
    2. (golf) The part of a game in which a player attempts to hit the ball into one of the holes.
    3. (baseball) The rear portion of the defensive team between the shortstop and the third baseman.
    4. (chess) A square on the board, with some positional significance, that a player does not, and cannot in future, control with a friendly pawn.
    5. (stud poker) A card (also called a hole card) dealt face down thus unknown to all but its holder; the status in which such a card is.
    6. In the game of fives, part of the floor of the court between the step and the pepperbox.
  3. (archaeology, slang) An excavation pit or trench.
  4. (figuratively) A weakness; a flaw or ambiguity.
    • 2011, Fun – We Are Young
      But between the drinks and subtle things / The holes in my apologies, you know / I’m trying hard to take it back
  5. (informal) A container or receptacle.
  6. (physics) In semiconductors, a lack of an electron in an occupied band behaving like a positively charged particle.
  7. (computing) A security vulnerability in software which can be taken advantage of by an exploit.
  8. (slang, anatomy) An orifice, in particular the anus. When used with shut it always refers to the mouth.
  9. (Ireland, Scotland, particularly in the phrase “get one’s hole”) Sex, or a sex partner.
  10. (informal, with “the”) Solitary confinement, a high-security prison cell often used as punishment.
    Synonym: box
    • 2011, Ahmariah Jackson, IAtomic Seven, Locked Up but Not Locked Down
      Disciplinary actions can range from a mere write up to serious time in the hole.
  11. (slang) An undesirable place to live or visit; a hovel.
  12. (figuratively) Difficulty, in particular, debt.
  13. (graph theory) A chordless cycle in a graph.
  14. (slang, rail transport) A passing loop; a siding provided for trains traveling in opposite directions on a single-track line to pass each other.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:hole
  • (solitary confinement): administrative segregation, ad-seg, block (UK), box, cooler (UK), hotbox, lockdown, pound, SCU, security housing unit, SHU, special handling unit
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Japanese: ホール (hōru)
  • Sranan Tongo: olo
Translations

Verb

hole (third-person singular simple present holes, present participle holing, simple past and past participle holed)

  1. (transitive) To make holes in (an object or surface).
  2. (transitive, by extension) To destroy.
  3. (intransitive) To go into a hole.
  4. (transitive) To drive into a hole, as an animal, or a billiard ball or golf ball.
    • 1799, Sporting Magazine (volume 13, page 49)
      If the player holes the red ball, he scores three, and upon holing his adversary’s ball, he gains two; and thus it frequently happens, that seven are got upon a single stroke, by caramboling and holing both balls.
  5. (transitive) To cut, dig, or bore a hole or holes in.
    to hole a post for the insertion of rails or bars
Derived terms
  • holeable
  • holer
  • hole out
  • hole up
Translations

Etymology 2

Adjective

hole (comparative holer or more hole, superlative holest or most hole)

  1. Obsolete spelling of whole.
    • 1843, Sir George Webbe Dasent (translator), A grammar of the Icelandic or Old Norse tongue (originally by Rasmus Christian Rask)
      Such was the arrangement of the alphabet over the hole North.

Anagrams

  • Hoel, OHLE, helo, ohel, oleh

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦolɛ]

Noun

hole

  1. inflection of hůl:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Verb

hole

  1. masculine singular present transgressive of holit

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhoːlə/

Verb

hole

  1. inflection of holen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Hausa

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hóː.lèː/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [hóː.lèː]

Verb

hōlḕ (grade 4)

  1. to relax, to enjoy oneself

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hāl

Adjective

hole

  1. healthy
  2. safe
  3. whole, complete, full
Alternative forms
  • hol, ol, ole, hoal, hoale, hoel, hoil, hoille, holle, wholle
  • hal, hale, halle (Northern)
References
  • “hōl(e, adj.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Adverb

hole

  1. wholly
Alternative forms
  • hol
References
  • “hōl(e, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Noun

hole (plural holes)

  1. whole, entirety
  2. health
  3. remedy, cure
Alternative forms
  • hol
References
  • “hōl(e, n.(3).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Descendants

  • English: whole
  • Scots: hole, holl

Etymology 2

From Old English hol

Noun

hole (plural holes or holen)

  1. hole
Alternative forms
  • hol, ol, ole, holle, hoil, houl, hul
Descendants
  • English: hole
  • Scots: hole

References

  • “hō̆l(e, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 3

From Old English hulu; see hull for more.

Noun

hole (plural holes)

  1. hull (outer covering of a fruit or seed)
  2. hut, shelter
  3. hull (of a ship)
Alternative forms
  • hol, holle, hul, hule, ule, hulle, ulle, hoile, huole
Descendants
  • English: hull
  • Scots: huil

References

  • “hol(e, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 4

Verb

hole

  1. past participle of helen (to cover)
    Synonym: heled
Alternative forms
  • holn

Etymology 5

Adjective

hole

  1. Alternative form of hol (hollow)

Etymology 6

Noun

hole (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of oile (oil)

Etymology 7

Noun

hole (plural holen)

  1. Alternative form of oule (owl)

Etymology 8

Adjective

hole

  1. Alternative form of holy (holy)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse hola

Noun

hole f or m (definite singular hola or holen, indefinite plural holer, definite plural holene)

  1. alternative form of hule

References

  • “hole” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • hòle

Etymology

From Old Norse hola

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²hoːlə/

Noun

hole f (definite singular hola, indefinite plural holer, definite plural holene)

  1. a cave
  2. a cavity (anatomy)
  3. a den

Derived terms

  • augehole

References

  • “hole” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

From Middle High German holen, from Old High German holon, from Proto-West Germanic *holōn (to fetch). Compare German holen, Dutch halen. Related to English haul.

Verb

hole

  1. to fetch

Slovak

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦole]

Noun

hole f

  1. genitive singular of hoľa

Sotho

Noun

hole 17 (uncountable)

  1. far away

Yola

Verb

hole

  1. Alternative form of helt


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: trăp, IPA(key): /tɹæp/, [tɹ̥æp], [tʃɹ̥æp]
  • (Northern English) IPA(key): [t̠ɹ̝̊äp]
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1

From Middle English trappe, from Old English træppe, treppe (trap, snare) (also in betræppan (to trap)) from Proto-Germanic *trap-, from Proto-Indo-European *dremb- (to run).

Akin to Old High German trappa, trapa (trap, snare), Middle Dutch trappe (trap, snare), Middle Low German treppe (step, stair) (German Treppe “step, stair”), Old English treppan (to step, tread) and possibly Albanian trap (raft, channel, path). Connection to “step” is “that upon which one steps”. French trappe and Spanish trampa are ultimately borrowings from Germanic.

Noun

trap (countable and uncountable, plural traps)

  1. A machine or other device designed to catch (and sometimes kill) animals, either by holding them in a container, or by catching hold of part of the body.
    Synonym: snare
  2. A trick or arrangement designed to catch someone in a more general sense; a snare.
  3. A covering over a hole or opening; a trapdoor.
  4. (now rare) A kind of movable stepladder or set of stairs.
    • 1798 January 3, Edinburgh Weekly Journal, page 5:
      There is likewise a cabin trap with five steps.
    • 1842, Ellison Jack (girl, age 11), quoted in The Condition and Treatment of the Children Employed in the Mines, page 48:
      “I have to bear my burthen up four traps, or ladders, before I get to the main road which leads to the pit bottom.”
    • 1847, David Low, Elements of Practical Agriculture, page 37
      They have very generally received the name of trap-rocks, because they often present the appearance of traps or stairs.
    • 1867, The Children’s hour, page 137:
      Little Alf turned at once, and bidding Frank good-bye, he went into the house, and climbed up the trap stair into his little room in the garret, and pondered in his heart these words of Dolly’s.
    • 1875, The Gardner: A Magazine of Horticulture and Floriculture, page 3:
      The labour and time that are saved by thus concentrating and placing the heating power in doing away with the running to so many points, and up and down so many stairs or traps in attending to a number of fires, is also well worth noticing.
    • 1887, George G. Green, Gordonhaven, page 114:
      Coming near the door, Scorgie cautioned quietness, and pointing to a trap stair he motioned Mr. Love and Donald to ascend to the loft.
    • 1889 (original 1886), Willock, Rosetty Ends, 29:
      Had climbed up the trap-stair, and was busy potterin’ aboot.
    • 1920, Soviet Russia, page 14:
      Tossing, the negro walks up the trap-ladder. But the emotions of a drunkard change quickly.
    • 1960, Bernard Guilbert Guerney, An Anthology of Russian Literature in the Soviet Period from Gorki to Pasternak
      The stokers, breaking into excited talk, picked him up and dragged him up the trap ladder to the deck. The Canadian wiped the blood off Petka’s injured forehead …
  5. A wooden instrument shaped somewhat like a shoe, used in the game of trapball.
  6. The game of trapball itself.
  7. Any device used to hold and suddenly release an object.
  8. A bend, sag, or other device in a waste-pipe arranged so that the liquid contents form a seal which prevents the escape of noxious gases, but permits the flow of liquids.
  9. A place in a water pipe, pump, etc., where air accumulates for lack of an outlet.
  10. (aviation, military, slang) A successful landing on an aircraft carrier using the carrier’s arresting gear.
  11. (historical) A light two-wheeled carriage with springs.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 2
      The two women looked down the alley. At the end of the Bottoms a man stood in a sort of old-fashioned trap, bending over bundles of cream-coloured stuff; while a cluster of women held up their arms to him, some with bundles.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 51
      I had told them they could have my trap to take them as far as the road went, because after that they had a long walk.
    • At the last moment Mollie, the foolish, pretty white mare who drew Mr. Jones’s trap, came mincing daintily in, chewing at a lump of sugar.
  12. (slang) A person’s mouth.
  13. (in the plural) Belongings.
    • 1870, Mark Twain, Running for Governor,
      …his cabin-mates in Montana losing small valuables from time to time, until at last, these things having been invariably found on Mr. Twain’s person or in his “trunk” (newspaper he rolled his traps in)…
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, New York: D. Appleton-Century, 1943, Chapter IX, p. 144, [1]
      “Carry your traps out, Ma?” asked one of the passengers.
  14. (slang) A cubicle (in a public toilet).
  15. (sports) Trapshooting.
  16. (geology) A geological structure that creates a petroleum reservoir.
  17. (computing) An exception generated by the processor or by an external event.
  18. (Australia, slang, historical) A mining license inspector during the Australian gold rush.
    • 1996, Judith Kapferer, Being All Equal: Identity, Difference and Australian Cultural Practice, page 84,
      The miners′ grievances centred on the issue of the compulsory purchase of miners′ licences and the harassment of raids by the licensing police, the ‘traps,’ in search of unlicensed miners.
    • 2006, Helen Calvert, Jenny Herbst, Ross Smith, Australia and the World: Thinking Historically, page 55,
      Diggers were angered by frequent licence inspections and harassment by ‘the traps’ (the goldfield police).
  19. (US, slang, African-American Vernacular, also attributive) A vehicle, residential building, or sidewalk corner where drugs are manufactured, packaged, or sold.
  20. (slang, informal, sometimes considered offensive) A fictional character from anime, or related media, who is coded as or has qualities typically associated with a gender other than the character’s ostensible gender; otokonoko.
    • 2013, One Piece: Grand Line 3 Point 5, page 47:
      One way to spot a trap is to look for an adam’s apple.
  21. (music, uncountable) A genre of hip-hop music, with half-time drums and heavy sub-bass.
    Synonym: trap music
  22. (slang, uncountable) The money earned by a prostitute for a pimp.
    • 2010, C. J. Land, A Hustler’s Tale, page 54:
      The money clip held thirty-nine hundred dollars, combined with her trap money, she had five thousand dollars for her man.
    • 2011, Shaheem Hargrove, Sharice Cuthrell, The Rise and Fall of a Ghetto Celebrity, page 55:
      The code was to call a pimp and tell him you have his hoe plus turn over her night trap but that was bull because the HOE was out of his stable months before I copped her.
    • 2012 (original 1981), Alix Kates Shulman, On the Stroll: A Novel, Open Road Media (→ISBN):
      For the first time in the week since she’d been hooking she hadn’t made her trap.
Antonyms

(aircraft-carrier landing): bolter

Derived terms
Translations

Verb

trap (third-person singular simple present traps, present participle trapping, simple past and past participle trapped)

  1. (transitive) To physically capture, to catch in a trap or traps, or something like a trap.
  2. (transitive) To ensnare; to take by stratagem; to entrap.
  3. (transitive) To provide with a trap.
  4. (intransitive) To set traps for game; to make a business of trapping game.
  5. (aviation, military, slang, intransitive) To successfully land an aircraft on an aircraft carrier using the carrier’s arresting gear.
  6. (intransitive) To leave suddenly, to flee.
  7. (US, slang, informal, African-American Vernacular, intransitive) To sell illegal drugs, especially in a public area.
  8. (computing, intransitive) To capture (e.g. an error) in order to handle or process it.
  9. (mining, dated) To attend to and open and close a (trap-)door.
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:trap.
Antonyms

(land on an aircraft carrier):

  • bolter
Derived terms
  • betrap
Translations

Related terms

  • entrap
  • entrapment

References

  • 1895, William Dwight Whitney, The Century Dictionary, page 6441, “trap”: “A kind of movable ladder or steps: a ladder leading up to a loft.”

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Swedish trapp (step, stair, stairway), from Middle Low German trappe (stair, step).

Noun

trap (countable and uncountable, plural traps)

  1. A dark coloured igneous rock, now used to designate any non-granitic igneous rock; trap rock.
Derived terms
  • trappean
  • trappous
  • trappy

Etymology 3

Akin to Middle English trappe (trappings, gear), and perhaps from Old Northern French trape, a byform of Old French drap, a word of the same origin as English drab (a kind of cloth).

Verb

trap (third-person singular simple present traps, present participle trapping, simple past and past participle trapped)

  1. To dress with ornaments; to adorn (especially said of horses).
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Godiva
      There she found her palfrey trapt / In purple blazon’d with armorial gold.
Related terms
  • trapping

Etymology 4

Shortening.

Noun

trap (plural traps)

  1. (slang, bodybuilding) The trapezius muscle.

Anagrams

  • part, part., patr-, prat, rapt, rtPA, tarp

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch trap, from Middle Dutch trappe, from Old Dutch *trappa, from Proto-Germanic *trappō, *trappōn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /trap/

Noun

trap (plural trappe, diminutive trappie)

  1. stairs, staircase

Albanian

Etymology

Either a t- prefixed form of *rap, related to rrap (cf. Old Norse raptr (rafter), English raft), or akin to Proto-Germanic *trap-, compare Old High German trappa, trapa (trap, snare), German Treppe (step, stair), Old English treppan (to step, tread), English trap.

Noun

trap m

  1. raft, ferry
  2. thick grove
  3. furrow, channel, ditch
  4. path (on the mountains or in the woods)

Related terms

  • rrap

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtrap]

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *torpъ.

Noun

trap m inan

  1. trot
    Synonyms: klus, poklus

Etymology 2

Noun

trap m inan

  1. trap shooting

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

trap

  1. second-person singular imperative of trápit

Further reading

  • trap in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • trap in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /trɑp/
  • Hyphenation: trap
  • Rhymes: -ɑp

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch trappe, from Old Dutch *trappa, from Proto-Germanic *trappō, *trappōn, from Proto-Indo-European *dremb- (to run).

Noun

trap m (plural trappen, diminutive trapje n or trappetje n)

  1. stairs, staircase
  2. ladder
  3. degree, grade
  4. kick (act of kicking)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: trap
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: trapu
  • Jersey Dutch: trāp
  • Negerhollands: trap
  • Indonesian: terap
  • Japanese: タラップ (tarappu)
  • Russian: трап (trap)

Verb

trap

  1. first-person singular present indicative of trappen
  2. imperative of trappen

Etymology 2

From German Trappe, from Polish drop or Czech drop.

Noun

trap f (plural trappen, diminutive trapje n)

  1. bustard

Anagrams

  • prat

Finnish

Etymology

From English trap.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtrɑp/, [ˈt̪rɑp]
  • IPA(key): /ˈtræp/, [ˈt̪ræp]
  • Rhymes: -ɑp
  • Syllabification: trap

Noun

trap

  1. trapshooting, trap (type of shooting sport)
  2. (ice hockey) trap

Declension

Pronunciation /ˈt̪rɑp/:

Pronunciation /ˈt̪ræp/:

See also

  • trappi

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /trap/

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

trap m inan

  1. (nautical) gangway, gangplank, gangboard, accommodation ladder
  2. trapdoor
    Synonym: zapadnia
Declension

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

trap

  1. second-person singular imperative of trapić

Further reading

  • trap in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • trap in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From English trap.

Noun

trap m, f (plural traps)

  1. trap (a transvestite or trans woman)

Noun

trap m (uncountable)

  1. trap (music)

Spanish

Etymology

From English trap.

Noun

trap m (uncountable)

  1. trap (music)

Derived terms

  • trapero

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