home vs plate what difference

what is difference between home and plate

English

Etymology

From Middle English home, hom, hoom, ham, from Old English hām (village, hamlet, manor, estate, home, dwelling, house, region, country), from Proto-West Germanic *haim, from Proto-Germanic *haimaz (home, village), from Proto-Indo-European *tḱóymos (village, home), from the root *tḱey-.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: hōm, IPA(key): /(h)əʊm/
  • (US) enPR: hōm, IPA(key): /hoʊm/
  • Rhymes: -əʊm
  • Homophones: Home, hom, holm, heaume, holme

Noun

home (plural homes)

  1. A dwelling.
    1. One’s own dwelling place; the house or structure in which one lives; especially the house in which one lives with one’s family; the habitual abode of one’s family; also, one’s birthplace.
      • c. 1526, William Tyndale, Bible: John 22:10:
        And the disciples wet awaye agayne vnto their awne home.
      • 1808, John Dryden, Walter Scott (editor), The Works of John Dryden:
        Thither for ease and soft repose we come: / Home is the sacred refuge of our life; / Secured from all approaches, but a wife.
      • 1822, John Howard Payne, Home! Sweet Home!:
        Home! home! sweet, sweet home! / There’s no place like home, there’s no place like home.
      • Rock-filled torrents smashed vehicles and homes, burying victims under rubble and sludge.
    2. The place where a person was raised; childhood or parental home; home of one’s parents or guardian.
      • 2004, Jean Harrison, Home:
        The rights listed in the UNCRC cover all areas of children’s lives such as their right to have a home and their right to be educated.
    3. The abiding place of the affections, especially of the domestic affections.
      • 1837, George Gordon Byron, Don Juan:
        He enter’d in the house—his home no more, / For without hearts there is no home; []
    4. A house that has been made home-like, to suit the comfort of those who live there.
    5. A place of refuge, rest or care; an asylum.
      Instead of a pet store, get your new dog from the local dogs’ home.
    6. (by extension) The grave; the final rest; also, the native and eternal dwelling place of the soul.
      • 1769, King James Bible, Oxford Standard text, Ecclesiastes 12:5:
        [] because man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets: []
  2. One’s native land; the place or country in which one dwells; the place where one’s ancestors dwell or dwelt.
    • 1863, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Our Old Home: A Series of English Sketches:
      Visiting these famous localities, and a great many others, I hope that I do not compromise my American patriotism by acknowledging that I was often conscious of a fervent hereditary attachment to the native soil of our forefathers, and felt it to be our own Old Home.
    • So this was my future home, I thought! Certainly it made a brave picture. I had seen similar ones fired-in on many a Heidelberg stein. Backed by towering hills, [] a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one’s dreams.
    • 1980, Peter Allen, song, I Still Call Australia Home:
      I’ve been to cities that never close down / From New York to Rio and old London town / But no matter how far or how wide I roam / I still call Australia home.
  3. The locality where a thing is usually found, or was first found, or where it is naturally abundant; habitat; seat.
    • 1706, Matthew Prior, An Ode, Humbly Inscribed to the Queen, on the ẛucceẛs of Her Majeẛty’s Arms, 1706, as republished in 1795, Robert Anderson (editor), The Works of the British Poets:
      [] Flandria, by plenty made the home of war, / Shall weep her crime, and bow to Charles r’estor’d, []
    • 1849, Alfred Tennyson, In Memoriam A. H. H.:
      Her eyes are homes of silent prayer, / Nor other thought her mind admits / But, he was dead, and there he sits, / And he that brought him back is there.
    • Africa is home to so many premier-league diseases (such as AIDS, childhood diarrhoea, malaria and tuberculosis) that those in lower divisions are easily ignored.
  4. A focus point.
    1. (board games) The ultimate point aimed at in a progress; the goal.
    2. (baseball) Home plate.
    3. (lacrosse) The place of a player in front of an opponent’s goal; also, the player.
    4. (Internet) The landing page of a website; the site’s homepage.
  5. (computing) Clipping of home directory.

Synonyms

  • (one’s own dwelling place): tenement, house, dwelling, abode, domicile, residence
  • ((baseball) home plate): home base

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

home (third-person singular simple present homes, present participle homing, simple past and past participle homed)

  1. (of animals, transitive) To return to its owner.
    The dog homed.
  2. (always with “in on”, transitive) To seek or aim for something.
    The missile was able to home in on the target.
    • 2008 July, Ewen Callaway, New Scientist:
      Much like a heat-seeking missile, a new kind of particle homes in on the blood vessels that nourish aggressive cancers, before unleashing a cell-destroying drug.

Translations

Adjective

home (not comparable)

  1. Of, from, or pertaining to one’s dwelling or country; domestic; not foreign [from 13th c.]
  2. (now rare, except in phrases) That strikes home; direct, pointed. [from 17th c.]
  3. (obsolete) Personal, intimate. [17th–19th c.]
    • 1778, Frances Burney, Journals & Letters, Penguin 2001, p. 91:
      I hardly knew what I answered him, but, by degrees I tranquillised, as I found he forbore distressing me any further, by such Home strokes […].
  4. (sports) Relating to the home team (the team at whose venue a game is played). [from 19th c.]
    Antonyms: away, road, visitor

Derived terms

Adverb

home (not comparable)

  1. To one’s home
    1. To one’s place of residence or one’s customary or official location
      • 1863, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Our Old Home: A Series of English Sketches,
        He made no complaint of his ill-fortune, but only repeated in a quiet voice, with a pathos of which he was himself evidently unconscious, “I want to get home to Ninety-second Street, Philadelphia.”
    2. To one’s place of birth
    3. To the place where it belongs; to the end of a course; to the full length
      • c.1603, William Shakespeare The Tragedy of Othello, The Moor of Venice, Act 5, Scene 1,
        Wear thy good rapier bare, and put it home: []
      • 1988, Roald Dahl, Matilda
        Eventually she managed to slide the lid of the pencil-box right home and the newt was hers. Then, on second thoughts, she opened the lid just the tiniest fraction so that the creature could breathe.
    4. (Internet) To the home page
  2. At or in one’s place of residence or one’s customary or official location; at home
  3. To a full and intimate degree; to the heart of the matter; fully, directly.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, dedication to the Duke of Buckingham, in Essays Civil and Moral,
      I do now publish my Essays; which of all my other works have been most current : for that, as it seems, they come home to men’s business and bosoms.
    • 1718, Robert South, Twelve Sermons Preached at Several Times, And upon ẛeveral Occasions,
      How home the charge reaches us, has been made out by ẛhewing with what high impudence ẛome amongẛt us defend sin, …
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 67:
      Her treatment of you, you say, does no credit either to her education or fine sense. Very home put, truly!
  4. (Britain, soccer) into the goal
    • 2004, Tottenham 4-4 Leicester, BBC Sport: February,
      Walker was penalised for a picking up a Gerry Taggart backpass and from the resulting free-kick, Keane fired home after Johnnie Jackson’s initial effort was blocked.
  5. (nautical) into the right, proper or stowed position

Usage notes

  • Home is often used in the formation of compound words, many of which need no special definition; as, home-brewed, home-built, home-grown, etc.

Synonyms

  • (to home): homeward

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • home on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

  • home at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • home in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • home in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Mohe, hemo-

Asturian

Etymology

From Latin homō, hominem, from Proto-Italic *hemō, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰm̥mṓ.

Noun

home m (plural homes)

  1. man
  2. person
  3. husband

Synonyms

  • (person): persona
  • (husband): esposu, maríu

Derived terms

  • home del sacu

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Catalan home, hom, from Old Occitan omne, ome, from Latin homō, hominem (human being), from Old Latin hemō, from Proto-Italic *hemō, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰmṓ (earthling).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈɔ.mə/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈɔ.me/

Noun

home m (plural homes or hòmens)

  1. man
  2. husband
    Synonyms: cònjuge, espòs, marit

Antonyms

Derived terms

  • home llop
  • homenet

Related terms

  • prohom

Hypernyms

Further reading

  • “home” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “home” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “home” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “home” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Classical Nahuatl

Numeral

ho̊me

  1. (Codex Magliabechiano) Obsolete spelling of ōme

Esperanto

Etymology

From homo.

Adverb

home

  1. humanly

Finnish

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *homeh, from earlier *šomeš, borrowed from Proto-Germanic *swammaz or earlier Pre-Germanic. Cognate to Karelian homeh, Veps homeh.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhomeˣ/, [ˈho̞me̞(ʔ)]
  • Rhymes: -ome
  • Syllabification: ho‧me

Noun

home

  1. mildew, mold

Declension

Anagrams

  • hemo

Galician

Alternative forms

  • homem (Reintegrationist)

Etymology

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese ome, omẽe, from Latin homō, hominem, from Proto-Italic *hemō, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰm̥mṓ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɔ.mɪ]

Noun

home m (plural homes)

  1. human; person
  2. mankind
  3. man (adult male)
  4. male human
  5. husband

Derived terms

  • homiño (little man)
  • lobishome (werewolf)
  • ricohome (magnate)

Interjection

home

  1. man! (expresses surprise, or mild annoyance)

Derived terms

  • ho

See also

  • persoa

References

  • “home” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI – ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “home” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez – Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “home” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “home” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “home” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English home.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈom/, (careful style) /ˈowm/

Noun

home f (invariable)

  1. (computing) home (initial position of various computing objects)

References

Anagrams

  • ohmè

Leonese

Etymology

From Latin homō, hominem, from Proto-Italic *hemō, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰm̥mṓ.

Noun

home m (plural homes)

  1. man

Further reading

  • AEDLL

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

home (plural homes)

  1. Alternative form of hom (home)

Etymology 2

Pronoun

home

  1. Alternative form of whom (whom)

Etymology 3

Pronoun

home

  1. Alternative form of hem (them)

Etymology 4

Noun

home (plural homes)

  1. Alternative form of hamme (enclosure; meadow)

Etymology 5

Noun

home

  1. Alternative form of hame (hame (part of a harness))

Etymology 6

Verb

home (third-person singular simple present hometh, present participle homende, homynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle homed)

  1. Alternative form of hummen (to hum)

Mirandese

Etymology

From Latin homō, hominem, from Proto-Italic *hemō, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰm̥mṓ.

Noun

home m (plural homes)

  1. man
  2. husband

Antonyms

  • mulhier

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

home (present tense homar, past tense homa, past participle homa, passive infinitive homast, present participle homande, imperative hom)

  1. alternative form of homa (non-standard since 2012)

Old French

Alternative forms

see hom for alternative nominative singular forms

Etymology

From Latin hominem, accusative singular of homō, with the loss of the -in- syllable. The nominative form hom, om, on, hon derives from the Latin nominative homō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔ.mə/

Noun

home m (oblique plural homes, nominative singular hom, nominative plural home)

(oblique case)

  1. man (male adult human being)
  2. man (mankind; Homo sapiens)
  3. vassal; manservant

Coordinate terms

  • fame (woman)

Descendants

  • Middle French: homme
    • French: homme
      • Haitian Creole: lòm
      • Karipúna Creole French: uóm
      • English: en homme
    • French: on
      • Esperanto: oni
        • Ido: onu
      • Interlingue: on
  • Norman: houme (France), haomme (Guernsey), houmme (Jersey)
  • Picard: onme
  • Walloon: ome

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (homme)
  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (homme, supplement)
  • home on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub
  • von Wartburg, Walther (1928–2002), “homo”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 40, page 455 (contains a reference to the nominative singular forms hom, huem and om)

Old Occitan

Noun

home m (oblique plural homes, nominative singular hom, nominative plural home)

  1. Alternative form of ome

Old Portuguese

Noun

home m

  1. Alternative form of ome

Portuguese

Etymology

Denasalization of homem.

Noun

home m (plural homes)

  1. (nonstandard) Alternative form of homem


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: plāt, IPA(key): /pleɪt/, [pʰl̥eɪt]
  • Homophone: plait
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Etymology 1

Middle English, from Old French plate, from Medieval Latin plata, from Vulgar Latin *plat(t)us, from Ancient Greek πλατύς (platús, broad, flat, wide). Compare Spanish plato.

Noun

plate (plural plates)

  1. A slightly curved but almost flat dish from which food is served or eaten.
    I filled my plate from the bountiful table.
  2. (uncountable) Such dishes collectively.
  3. The contents of such a dish.
    I ate a plate of beans.
  4. A course at a meal.
    The meat plate was particularly tasty.
  5. (figuratively) An agenda of tasks, problems, or responsibilities
    With revenues down and transfer payments up, the legislature has a full plate.
  6. A flat metallic object of uniform thickness.
    A clutch usually has two plates.
  7. A vehicle license plate.
    He stole a car and changed the plates as soon as he could.
  8. A taxi permit, especially of a metal disc.
  9. A layer of a material on the surface of something, usually qualified by the type of the material; plating
    The bullets just bounced off the steel plate on its hull.
  10. A material covered with such a layer.
    If you’re not careful, someone will sell you silverware that’s really only silver plate.
  11. (dated) A decorative or food service item coated with silver or gold.
    The tea was served in the plate.
  12. (weightlifting) A weighted disk, usually of metal, with a hole in the center for use with a barbell, dumbbell, or exercise machine.
  13. (printing) An engraved surface used to transfer an image to paper.
    We finished making the plates this morning.
  14. (printing, photography) An image or copy.
  15. (printing, publishing) An illustration in a book, either black and white, or colour, usually on a page of paper of different quality from the text pages.
  16. (dentistry) A shaped and fitted surface, usually ceramic or metal that fits into the mouth and in which teeth are implanted; a dental plate.
  17. (construction) A horizontal framing member at the top or bottom of a group of vertical studs.
  18. (Cockney rhyming slang) A foot, from “plates of meat”.
    Sit down and give your plates a rest.
  19. (baseball) Home plate.
    There was a close play at the plate.
  20. (geology) A tectonic plate.
  21. (historical) Plate armour.
    He was confronted by two knights in full plate.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 2, Canto 5, p. 248,[1]
      He hewd, and lasht, and foynd, and thondred blowes,
      And euery way did seeke into his life,
      Ne plate, ne male could ward so mighty throwes,
      But yeilded passage to his cruell knife.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 6, lines 366-368,[2]
      Two potent Thrones, that to be less then Gods
      Disdain’d, but meaner thoughts learnd in thir flight,
      Mangl’d with gastly wounds through Plate and Maile.
  22. (herpetology) Any of various larger scales found in some reptiles.
  23. (engineering, electricity) A flat electrode such as can be found in an accumulator battery, or in an electrolysis tank.
  24. (engineering, electricity) The anode of a vacuum tube.
    Regulating the oscillator plate voltage greatly improves the keying.
  25. (obsolete) Silver or gold, in the form of a coin, or less often silver or gold utensils or dishes (from Spanish plata (silver)).
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act V, Scene 2,[3]
      [] realms and islands were
      As plates dropp’d from his pocket.
  26. (heraldry) A roundel of silver or tinctured argent.
  27. A prize given to the winner in a contest.
  28. (chemistry) Any flat piece of material such as coated glass or plastic.
  29. (aviation, travel industry, dated) A metallic card, used to imprint tickets with an airline’s logo, name, and numeric code.
  30. (aviation, travel industry, by extension) The ability of a travel agent to issue tickets on behalf of a particular airline.
  31. (Australia) A VIN plate, particularly with regard to the car’s year of manufacture.
  32. One of the thin parts of the brisket of an animal.
  33. A very light steel horseshoe for racehorses.
  34. (furriers’ slang) Skins for fur linings of garments, sewn together and roughly shaped, but not finally cut or fitted.
  35. (hat-making) The fine nap (as of beaver, musquash, etc.) on a hat whose body is made from inferior material.
  36. (music) A record, usually vinyl.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Maori: pereti
  • Hindi: प्लेट (pleṭ)
Translations

Verb

plate (third-person singular simple present plates, present participle plating, simple past and past participle plated)

  1. To cover the surface material of an object with a thin coat of another material, usually a metal.
    This ring is plated with a thin layer of gold.
  2. To place the various elements of a meal on the diner’s plate prior to serving.
    After preparation, the chef will plate the dish.
  3. (baseball) To score a run.
    The single plated the runner from second base.
  4. (transitive) To arm or defend with metal plates.
  5. (transitive) To beat into thin plates.
  6. (aviation, travel industry) To specify which airline a ticket will be issued on behalf of.
    Tickets are normally plated on an itinerary’s first international airline.
  7. (philately) to categorise stamps based on their position on the original sheet, in order to reconstruct an entire sheet.
  8. (philately) (particularly with early British stamps) to identify the printing plate used.
Derived terms
  • chrome-plated
  • chromium-plated
  • electroplate
  • nickel-plated
Translations

Etymology 2

Middle English, partly from Anglo-Norman plate (plate, bullion) and partly from Latin plata (silver), from Vulgar Latin *platta (metal plate), from feminine of Latin *plattus (flat).

Noun

plate (usually uncountable, plural plates)

  1. Precious metal, especially silver.
    • At the northern extremity of this chill province the gold plate of the Groans, pranked across the shining black of the long table, smoulders as though it contains fire []

Anagrams

  • -petal, Patel, leapt, lepta, palet, pelta, petal, pleat, tepal

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plat/

Etymology 1

Adjective

plate

  1. feminine singular of plat

Noun

plate f (plural plates)

  1. Very small flat boat.

Etymology 2

Adjective

plate (plural plates)

  1. (Canada, informal) Annoyingly boring.
  2. (Canada, informal) Troublesome.

Anagrams

  • palet, pelât, petal, leapt, pleat

Further reading

  • “plate” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latvian

Noun

plate f (5th declension)

  1. plate
  2. table-leaf
  3. (music) record
  4. (music) disc
  5. (computing) board
  6. (computing) card
  7. (computing) printed circuit board
  8. (computing) circuit board

Declension

Synonyms

  • dēlis
  • plāksne
  • plātne
  • (computing) drukātās shēmas plate
  • (computing) shēmas plate

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse plata, from Ancient Greek πλατύς (platús, broad, flat, wide).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plaː.te/, [ˈplaː.tə]

Noun

plate f or m (definite singular plata or platen, indefinite plural plater, definite plural platene)

  1. plate (thin, flat object)
  2. record (vinyl disc)

Synonyms

  • (flat object): skive

Derived terms

  • kokeplate
  • plateselskap

References

“plate” in The Bokmål Dictionary.


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse plata, from Ancient Greek πλατύς (platús, broad, flat, wide).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²plɑːtə/

Noun

plate f (definite singular plata, indefinite plural plater, definite plural platene)

  1. plate (thin, flat object)
  2. record (vinyl disc)

Synonyms

  • (flat object): skive

Derived terms

  • kokeplate
  • plateselskap

References

“plate” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


Old French

Alternative forms

  • platte

Etymology

From Medieval Latin plata, from Vulgar Latin *platta, *plattus.

Noun

plate f (oblique plural plates, nominative singular plate, nominative plural plates)

  1. a flat metal disk
  2. a flat plate of armor

Descendants

  • Middle English: [Term?]
    • English: plate
      • Maori: pereti
      • Hindi: प्लेट (pleṭ)
    • Scots: plate
  • Irish: pláta

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (plate)

Scots

Etymology

Middle English, from Old French plate.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plet/, or sometimes IPA(key): /plɪt/ in the Borders

Noun

plate (plural plates)

  1. bowl

Serbo-Croatian

Noun

plate (Cyrillic spelling плате)

  1. inflection of plata:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Verb

plate (Cyrillic spelling плате)

  1. third-person plural present of platiti

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