hood vs punk what difference

what is difference between hood and punk

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hʊd/
    • (General American) IPA(key): [hʊ̈d], [hɪ̈d]
  • Rhymes: -ʊd

Etymology 1

From Middle English hood, hod, from Old English hōd, from Proto-Germanic *hōdaz (cognate with Saterland Frisian Houd, West Frisian/Dutch hoed, German Low German Hood, German Hut). Cognate with Proto-Iranian *xawdaH (hat) (compare Avestan ????????????????(xåda), Old Persian ???????????? (x-u-d /xaudā/)), from Proto-Indo-European *kadʰ- (to cover). More at hat.

Noun

hood (plural hoods)

  1. A covering for the head attached to a larger garment such as a jacket or cloak.
  2. A distinctively coloured fold of material, representing a university degree.
  3. An enclosure that protects something, especially from above.
  4. Particular parts of conveyances
    1. (automotive, chiefly Britain) A soft top of a convertible car or carriage.
    2. (automotive, chiefly US, Canada) The hinged cover over the engine of a motor vehicle, known as a bonnet in other countries.
      Synonyms: cowl, bonnet
    3. (by extension, especially in the phrase “under the hood”) A cover over the engine, driving machinery or inner workings of something.
      • 2004, D. Michael Abrashoff, Get Your Ship Together: How Great Leaders Inspire Ownership From The Keel Up, Penguin (→ISBN):
        Like many captains, I was just as glad to leave engineering to the engineers. Looking under the ship’s hood wasn’t what interested me.
      • 2015, Max Lucado, Let the Journey Begin: Finding God’s Best for Your Life, Thomas Nelson (→ISBN), page 71:
        I never see the pilot percolating coffee or the attendant with a screwdriver under the airplane’s hood. Why? Because we all have something we are good at, and we are expected to do that one thing well.
    4. A metal covering that leads to a vent to suck away smoke or fumes.
    5. (nautical) One of the endmost planks (or, one of the ends of the planks) in a ship’s bottom at bow or stern, that fits into the rabbet. (These, when fit into the rabbet, resemble a hood (covering).)
      • 1830, A Treatise on Marine Architecture, page 260:
        Care must also be taken to place the tenons on the main post so that a stop-water can be driven between it and the fore tenon and the rabbet of the hoods at the keel. The post being dressed to its proper dimensions, the tenons cut, and their …
      • 1874, Samuel James P. Thearle, Naval architecture: a treatise on laying off and building wood, iron, and composite ships. [With] Plates, page 360:
        The fore hoods end at a rabbet cut in the wood stem (see Plate CXVIII.), and the after hoods end at a rabbet prepared in the yellow metal body post. The fore hoods are fastened to the bottom plating as elsewhere; but in the stem they have  …
      • 1940, Lauchlan McKay, Richard Cornelius McKay, The Practical hip-builder, page 62:
        But for deep and narrow vessels you must line your hooden-ends wider to get up faster, and consequently the lower ends of the after-hoods will come round, []
  5. Various body parts
    1. (ophiology) An expansion on the sides of the neck typical for many elapids e.g. the Egyptian cobra (Naja haje) and Indian cobra (Naja naja).
    2. (colloquial) The osseous or cartilaginous marginal extension behind the back of many a dinosaur such as a ceratopsid and reptiles such as Chlamydosaurus kingii.
      Synonym: frill
    3. In the human hand, over the extensor digitorum, an expansion of the extensor tendon over the metacarpophalangeal joint (the extensor hood syn. dorsal hood syn. lateral hood)
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • cuculliform (hood-shaped)

Verb

hood (third-person singular simple present hoods, present participle hooding, simple past and past participle hooded)

  1. To cover something with a hood.
    Antonym: unhood
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • 2004, George Fletcher Bass, Serçe Limanı: An Eleventh-century Shipwreck, Texas A&M University Press (→ISBN), page 516:
    Hooding ends [Hoods, Hood ends] The ends of planks that fit into the stem and sternpost rabbets.

Etymology 2

Clipping of hoodlum.

Noun

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (slang) Gangster, thug.
    • 1968, John McPhee, The Pine Barrens, Chapter 7
      Teen-age hoods steal cars in cities, take them into the pines, strip them, ignite them, and leave the scene.
Translations

Etymology 3

Clipping of neighborhood; compare nabe.

Alternative forms

  • ‘hood

Adjective

hood (not comparable)

  1. Relating to inner-city everyday life, both positive and negative aspects; especially people’s attachment to and love for their neighborhoods.
Translations

Noun

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (African American Vernacular English, slang) Neighborhood.
Usage notes

Particularly used for poor US inner-city black neighborhoods. Also used more generally, as a casual neutral term for “neighborhood”, but marked by strong associations.

Synonyms
  • (poor neighborhood, esp. black): ghetto
  • (neighborhood): nabe, neighborhood
Translations

Etymology 4

Clipping of hoodie, influenced by existing sense “hoodlum”.

Noun

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (Britain) Person wearing a hoodie.

Anagrams

  • Hodo, hodo-

Manx

Pronoun

hood (emphatic form hoods)

  1. (informal) second-person singular of hug
    to you

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • hode, hod, hude, hudde, hoode

Etymology

From Old English hōd, from Proto-Germanic *hōdaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hoːd/
  • Rhymes: -oːd

Noun

hood (plural hoodes)

  1. hood (part of a garment):
    1. A hood as a symbol of rank (of the church and of guilds).
    2. A hood made of chain mail used as head armour.
  2. (rare, Late Middle English) Any sort of protective cloaking or covering.

Derived terms

  • hoden
  • hoder
  • hodles
  • hodynge

Descendants

  • English: hood
  • Scots: hude, huid

References

  • “họ̄d, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-12.

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian hâved.

Noun

hood n (plural hööd)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) (anatomy) head
    at hood sködle

    to shake one’s head


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pʌŋk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /pəŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋk

Etymology 1

Of uncertain origin. Possibly from the application of the sense punk (rotten wood dust used as tinder) (attested since 1678) to anything worthless (attested since 1869) and then to any undesirable person (since 1908).

Noun

punk (countable and uncountable, plural punks)

  1. (countable) A person used for sex, particularly:
    1. (now historical and rare) Synonym of prostitute: a person paid for sex. [1575]
      • , Act V, Scene i:
        My lord, she may be a punk; for many of them are neither maid, widow, nor wife.
      • 1663: Samuel Butler, Hudibras:
        …And made them fight, like mad or drunk,
        For Dame Religion, as for punk
      • 1936, Anthony Bertram, Like the Phoenix:
        However, terrible as it may seem to the tall maiden sisters of J.P.’s in Queen Anne houses with walled vegetable gardens, this courtesan, strumpet, harlot, whore, punk, fille de joie, street-walker, this trollop, this trull, this baggage, this hussy, this drab, skit, rig, quean, mopsy, demirep, demimondaine, this wanton, this fornicatress, this doxy, this concubine, this frail sister, this poor Queenie—did actually solicit me, did actually say ‘coming home to-night, dearie’ and my soul was not blasted enough to call a policeman.
    2. (LGBT, obsolete) Synonym of catamite: a boy or younger man used by an older as a (usually passive) homosexual partner. [1698]
      • 1698, Womens Complaint to Venus:
        The Beaus…
        At night make a Punk of him that’s first drunk.
    3. (chiefly US, LGBT) Synonym of bottom: any passive or effeminate homosexual male.
    4. (US, LGBT, slang) A boy who accompanies a hobo, especially as used for sex. [1893]
      • 1973, Barry Broadfoot, Ten Lost Years, 1929-1939: Memories of Canadians who survived the Depression, p. 137:
        They’d pick up youngsters as, well—as their playthings. These kids were called punks.
    5. (US, LGBT, derogatory, now chiefly African-American Vernacular) Synonym of faggot: any male homosexual. [1933]
    6. (US, LGBT, prison slang) Synonym of bitch: a man forced or coerced into a homosexual relationship, especially in prison. [1946]
      • 1946, Mezz Mezzrow & al., Really the Blues, Payback Press 1999, p. 15:
        A punk, if you want it in plain English, is a boy with smooth skin who takes the place of a woman in a jailbird’s love life.
      • 2001, Joseph T. Hallinan, Going Up the River: Travels in a Prison Nation, p. 106:
        If he is small and weak, he may decide to become a ‘punk’ and allow himself to be raped by the inmate most likely to protect him.
  2. (countable, US slang) A worthless person, particularly: [1904]
    • 1933, Ernest Hemingway, “Winner Take Nothing”, p. 94:
      This fellow was just a punk… a nobody.
    1. (humorous, rare) Synonym of fellow: any person, especially a male comrade. [1904]
    2. (derogatory) A petty criminal, especially a juvenile delinquent. [1908]
      • 1908 October 18, New York Times, p. 9:
        He said the prisoner called them ‘punk’… He admitted that he shouted ‘punk’ to them.
      • 1963, Thomas Pynchon, V, p. 145:
        There was nothing so special about the gang, punks are punks.
    3. (derogatory) Synonym of sissy: a weak, timid person. [1939]
      • 1950, Hal Ellson, Tomboy, p. 12:
        Do you think a little thing like a scratch would bother me? I’m no punk.
      • 2006, Kali James, Can U Get Away? (page 17)
        Taking him home she hemmed him up soon as they stepped in the door. Now Tony was a bad dude in the streets but when it came to his mama, he was a punk. A few cuss words on her part had him spilling everything.
    4. Synonym of amateur. [1923]
    5. (circus slang) A young, untrained animal or worker. [1926]
  3. (uncountable, music) Short for punk rock, a genre known for short, loud, energetic songs with electric guitars and strong drums. [1970]
    • 1972 November, L. Bangs, Creem, p. 68:
      Who else… would have the nerve to actually begin a song with the line ‘Whatchew gonna do, mama, now that the roast beef’s gone…?’ Man, that is true punk; that is so fucked up it’s got class up the ass.
  4. (countable) Short for punk rocker, a musician known for playing punk rock or a fan of the genre. [1976]
  5. (uncountable) The larger nonconformist social movement associated with punk rock and its fans.
Usage notes

In its sense as a punk rocker, sometimes given the informal plural form punx.

Synonyms
  • (male homosexual senses): See Thesaurus:male homosexual
  • (hobo’s boy companion): gunsel
  • (juvenile delinquent): trouble-maker, hoodlum, hooligan
Derived terms
  • punker (as a prostitute’s client)
Translations

Adjective

punk (comparative punker, superlative punkest)

  1. (US, colloquial) Worthless, contemptible, particularly [1907]
    1. Bad, substandard.
    2. Thuggish, criminal.
    3. (chiefly African-American Vernacular) Cowardly. [1930]
    4. Poorly, sickly.
    5. Inexperienced.
  2. Of or concerning punk rock or its associated subculture. [1971]

Verb

punk (third-person singular simple present punks, present participle punking, simple past and past participle punked)

  1. To pimp.
  2. To forcibly perform anal sex upon an unwilling partner.
    Ricky punked his new cell-mates.
    • 1934, James T. Farrell, The Young Manhood of Studs Lonigan, Ch. 19:
      “Hell, Haggerty, with that caved-in chest you got, and with your guts pickled in alcohol, and a leg and a half in the grave, the Navy wouldn’t even take you for punkin’, Barney sourly said.
  3. To prank.
    I got expelled when I punked the principal.
  4. (especially with “out”) To give up or concede; to act like a wimp.
    Jimmy was going to help me with the prank, but he punked (out) at the last minute.
  5. (often with “out” or “up”) To adapt or embellish in the style of the punk movement.
Usage notes

The relatively tame 21st century usage of punk to mean “prank” was popularized by the American television show Punk’d. Until as recently as the late 20th century, punk still connoted rape or submitting to anal rape (punk out). The second use of the term punk-out is now comparable to acting like a pussy and mildly implies submissive behavior in general.

Synonyms
  • (to pimp): hustle, prostitute; see also Thesaurus:pimp out

Derived terms

Etymology 2

Perhaps a reduction of spunk (tinder); compare funk (rotten wood). Alternatively, perhaps from Unami punkw (dust).

Noun

punk (countable and uncountable, plural punks)

  1. (uncountable) Any material used as tinder for lighting fires, such as agaric, dried wood, or touchwood, but especially wood altered by certain fungi.
    • 1899, H. B. Cushman, History of the Choctaw, Chickasaw and Natchez Indians, page 271:
      On one occasion a venerable old Indian man, who, in order to light his pipe, was trying to catch a spark upon a piece of punk struck from his flint and steel; …
    • 1922, Harry Ignatius Marshall, The Karen People of Burma, page 61:
      The oil is mixed with bits of dry wood or punk and moulded into sticks about a cubit long and an inch in diameter by putting it into joints of small bamboo.
    • 2001, William W. Johnstone, War of the Mountain Man, page 116:
      He made him a little smoldering pocket of punk to light the fuses and waited.
  2. (countable) A utensil for lighting wicks or fuses (such as those of fireworks) resembling stick incense.
    • 1907, Jack London, The Road, [2]:
      On the end a coal of fire slowly smouldered. It would last for hours, and my cell-mate called it a “punk.”
    • 1994, Ashland Price, Viking Tempest, page 353:
      Then, without another word, he rose and left the shelter, apparently in order to light the vessel’s wick with a punk from the dying campfire.
    • 2004, Shawn Shiflett, Hidden Place, page 221:
      He raised the cylinder high in the air with his bare hand, used a punk to light the fuse, and KABOOM!

References

Citations

Bibliography

  • “punk, n.¹ and adj.².”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 2007.

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from English punk.

Noun

punk m (plural punks)

  1. punk

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English punk.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʏŋk/
  • Hyphenation: punk

Noun

punk m (uncountable)

  1. (music) punk, punk rock (rock genre)
    Synonym: punkrock

Derived terms

  • punkband
  • punker
  • punkkapsel

Noun

punk m (plural punks)

  1. (uncommon, music) a punk (member of the punk subculture, fan of punk rock)
    Synonym: punker

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English punk.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pœŋk/

Noun

punk m (plural punks)

  1. punk

Adjective

punk (feminine singular punke, masculine plural punks, feminine plural punkes)

  1. punk

Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • pønk

Etymology

Borrowed from English punk.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pøŋk/

Noun

punk m (definite singular punken, uncountable)

  1. punk music

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English punk.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈpɐ̃k/

Noun

punk m (uncountable)

  1. punk (a social and musical movement)
  2. punk; punk rock (a subgenre of rock music)

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:punk.

Noun

punk m, f (plural punks)

  1. punk (a member of the punk movement or fan of punk rock)

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:punk.

Adjective

punk (invariable, comparable)

  1. relating to punk music or culture
  2. (Brazil, slang, of a thing or situation) complicated, difficult, tense

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English punk.

Noun

punk m (plural punks)

  1. punk

Derived terms

  • anarcopunk

Related terms

  • punki

Further reading

  • “punk” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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