hook vs pinch what difference

what is difference between hook and pinch

English

Etymology

From Middle English hoke, from Old English hōc, from Proto-West Germanic *hōk, from Proto-Germanic *hōkaz, variant of *hakô (hook), probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kog-, *keg-, *keng- (peg, hook, claw).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ho͝ok, IPA(key): /hʊk/
  • (sometimes in Northern England, otherwise obsolete) enPR: ho͞ok IPA(key): /huːk/
  • Rhymes: -ʊk

Noun

hook (plural hooks)

  1. A rod bent into a curved shape, typically with one end free and the other end secured to a rope or other attachment.
  2. A barbed metal hook used for fishing; a fishhook.
  3. Any of various hook-shaped agricultural implements such as a billhook.
  4. The curved needle used in the art of crochet.
  5. The part of a hinge which is fixed to a post, and on which a door or gate hangs and turns.
  6. A loop shaped like a hook under certain written letters, for example, g and j.
  7. A tie-in to a current event or trend that makes a news story or editorial relevant and timely.
  8. A snare; a trap.
  9. (in the plural) The projecting points of the thighbones of cattle; called also hook bones.
  10. (informal) Removal or expulsion from a group or activity.
  11. (agriculture) A field sown two years in succession.
  12. (authorship) A brief, punchy opening statement intended to get attention from an audience, reader, or viewer, and make them want to continue to listen to a speech, read a book, or watch a play.
  13. (narratology) A gimmick or element of a creative work intended to be attention-grabbing for the audience; a compelling idea for a story that will be sure to attract people’s attention.
  14. (bridge, slang) A finesse.
  15. (card games, slang) A jack (the playing card).
  16. (geography) A spit or narrow cape of sand or gravel turned landward at the outer end, such as Sandy Hook in New Jersey.
  17. (music) A catchy musical phrase which forms the basis of a popular song.
  18. (nautical, informal) A ship’s anchor.
  19. (programming) Part of a system’s operation that can be intercepted to change or augment its behaviour.
    Synonym: endpoint
    • 2015, Rachel Alt-Simmons, Agile by Design (page 182)
      In lieu of those unneeded hooks, write code to fail fast and prevent gaps from becoming a problem.
  20. (Scrabble) An instance of playing a word perpendicular to a word already on the board, adding a letter to the start or the end of the word to form a new word.
  21. (typography) a diacritical mark shaped like the upper part of a question mark, as in .
  22. (typography, rare) a háček.
    • 2003, Language Issues XV–XVIII, page 36
      Common diacritics in Slavonic language are the hook ˇ (as in haček – Czech for ‘hook’) and the stroke ´ (robić – Polish for ‘do/make’).
    • 2003, David Adams, The Song and Duet Texts of Antonín Dvořák, page 168
      In Czech, palatalization is normally indicated by the symbol ˇ, called haček or “hook.”
    • 2004, Keesing’s Record of World Events L:i–xii, page unknown
      In detailing the proposed shortening of the Czech Republic to Česko…the hook (hacek) erroneously appeared over the letter “e” instead of the “C”.
  23. Senses relating to sports.
    1. (baseball) A curveball.
    2. (basketball) a basketball shot in which the offensive player, usually turned perpendicular to the basket, gently throws the ball with a sweeping motion of his arm in an upward arc with a follow-through which ends over his head. Also called hook shot.
    3. (bowling) A ball that is rolled in a curved line.
    4. (boxing) a type of punch delivered with the arm rigid and partially bent and the fist travelling nearly horizontally mesially along an arc
    5. (cricket) A type of shot played by swinging the bat in a horizontal arc, hitting the ball high in the air to the leg side, often played to balls which bounce around head height.
    6. (golf) A golf shot that (for the right-handed player) curves unintentionally to the left. (See draw, slice, fade.)
  24. (Canada, Australia, military) Any of the chevrons denoting rank.
  25. (slang) A prostitute.
    Synonym: hooker
    • 1983, G. W. Levi Kamel, Downtown Street Hustlers (page 160)
      I was talkin’ to a couple of the ‘hooks’ (female prostitutes) I know.
  26. (Britain, slang, obsolete) A pickpocket.
    • 1885, Michael Davitt, Leaves from a Prison Diary (page 18)
      He preceded me to Dartmoor, where I found his fame even more loudly trumpeted than ever, especially by Manchester “hooks” (pickpockets), who boast of being the rivals of the “Cocks,” or Londoners, in the art of obtaining other people’s property without paying for it.
    • 2003, David W. Maurer, Whiz Mob: A Correlation of the Technical Argot of Pickpockets with Their Behavior Pattern (page 58)
      “Everybody’s a tool over there. Everybody’s a hook, except them four guys on the points of the compass. They are eight or ten strong over there.” But all professional pickpockets, however expert or however clumsy, operate on the basis of the situation just outlined.

Hyponyms

  • grappling hook

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

  • Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. Template:isbn

Verb

hook (third-person singular simple present hooks, present participle hooking, simple past and past participle hooked)

  1. (transitive) To attach a hook to.
  2. (transitive) To catch with a hook (hook a fish).
  3. (transitive) To work yarn into a fabric using a hook; to crochet.
  4. (transitive) To insert in a curved way reminiscent of a hook.
  5. (transitive) To ensnare or obligate someone, as if with a hook.
  6. (Britain, US, slang, archaic) To steal.
  7. (transitive) To connect (hook into, hook together).
  8. (usually in passive) To make addicted; to captivate.
  9. (cricket, golf) To play a hook shot.
  10. (rugby) To succeed in heeling the ball back out of a scrum (used particularly of the team’s designated hooker).
  11. (field hockey, ice hockey) To engage in the illegal maneuver of hooking (i.e., using the hockey stick to trip or block another player)
  12. (soccer) To swerve a ball; kick a ball so it swerves or bends.
  13. (intransitive, slang) To engage in prostitution.
  14. (Scrabble) To play a word perpendicular to another word by adding a single letter to the existing word.
  15. (bridge, slang) To finesse.
  16. (transitive) To seize or pierce with the points of the horns, as cattle in attacking enemies; to gore.
  17. (intransitive) To move or go with a sudden turn.

Derived terms

  • hooker
  • hook up

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Khoo, OHKO

Indonesian

Etymology

  • From Dutch hoek (corner, angle), from Middle Dutch hoec, huoc, from Old Dutch *huok, from Proto-Germanic *hōkaz (hook), from Proto-Indo-European *kog-, *keg-, *keng- (peg, hook, claw).
  • The hyper-correction influenced by the cognate English hook.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhʊk̚]

Noun

hook (first-person possessive hookku, second-person possessive hookmu, third-person possessive hooknya)

  1. (colloquial) alternative form of huk (land or building at the corner).


English

Etymology

From Middle English pinchen, from Old French *pinchier, pincer (to pinch), from Vulgar Latin *pinciāre (to puncture, pinch), from possible merger of *punctiāre (a puncture, sting), from Latin punctiō (a puncture, prick) and *piccāre (to strike, sting), from Frankish *pikkōn, from Proto-Germanic *pikkōną (to pick, peck, prick).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɪntʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪntʃ

Verb

pinch (third-person singular simple present pinches, present participle pinching, simple past and past participle pinched)

  1. To squeeze a small amount of a person’s skin and flesh, making it hurt.
    The children were scolded for pinching each other.
    This shoe pinches my foot.
  2. To squeeze between the thumb and forefinger.
  3. To squeeze between two objects.
  4. (slang, transitive) To steal, usually something inconsequential.
    Someone has pinched my handkerchief!
  5. (slang, transitive) To arrest or capture.
  6. (horticulture) To cut shoots or buds of a plant in order to shape the plant, or to improve its yield.
  7. (nautical) To sail so close-hauled that the sails begin to flutter.
  8. (hunting) To take hold; to grip, as a dog does.
  9. (obsolete, intransitive) To be stingy or covetous; to live sparingly.
    • 1788, Benjamin Franklin (attributed), Paper
      the wretch whom avarice bids to pinch and spare
  10. To seize; to grip; to bite; said of animals.
  11. (figuratively) To cramp; to straiten; to oppress; to starve.
    to be pinched for money
    • c. 1610?, Walter Raleigh, A Discourse of War
      want of room [] which pincheth the whole nation
    • 1902, William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience, Lecture 2:
      The Christian also spurns the pinched and mumping sick-room attitude, and the lives of saints are full of a kind of callousness to diseased conditions of body which probably no other human records show.
  12. To move, as a railroad car, by prying the wheels with a pinch.
  13. (obsolete) To complain or find fault.
    • 1809, Alexander Chalmers ed. The Works of the English Poets, from Cahucer to Cowper, Vol. 1, modern rendering of poem imputed to Geoffrey Chaucer, “A Ballad which Chaucer made in Praise or rather Dispraise of Women for their Doubleness”:
      Therefore who so them accuse
      Of any double entencion,
      To speake, rowne, other to muse,
      To pinch at their condicion,
      All is but false collusion,
      I dare rightwell the sothe express,
      They have no better protection,
      But shrowd them vnder doubleness.

Derived terms

  • pinch off
  • pinch out
  • pinch a loaf

Translations

Noun

pinch (plural pinches)

  1. The action of squeezing a small amount of a person’s skin and flesh, making it hurt.
  2. A close compression of anything with the fingers.
    I gave the leather of the sofa a pinch, gauging the texture.
  3. A small amount of powder or granules, such that the amount could be held between fingertip and thumb tip.
  4. An awkward situation of some kind (especially money or social) which is difficult to escape.
    • 1955, Rex Stout, “Die Like a Dog”, in Three Witnesses, October 1994 Bantam edition, →ISBN, page 171:
      It took nerve and muscle both to carry the body out and down the stairs to the lower hall, but he damn well had to get it out of his place and away from his door, and any of those four could have done it in a pinch, and it sure was a pinch.
  5. A metal bar used as a lever for lifting weights, rolling wheels, etc.
  6. An organic herbal smoke additive.
  7. (physics) A magnetic compression of an electrically-conducting filament.
  8. The narrow part connecting the two bulbs of an hourglass.
    • 2001, Terry Pratchett: Thief of Time:
      It looked like an hourglass, but all those little glittering shapes tumbling through the pinch were seconds.
  9. (slang) An arrest.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: ピンチ (pinchi)

Translations


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