hoop vs wicket what difference

what is difference between hoop and wicket

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ho͞op, IPA(key): /huːp/
  • Rhymes: -uːp

Etymology 1

From Middle English hoop, hoope, from Old English hōp (mound, raised land; in combination, circular object), from Proto-Germanic *hōpą (bend, bow, arch) (compare Saterland Frisian Houp (hoop), Dutch hoep (hoop), Old Norse hóp (bay, inlet)), from Proto-Indo-European *kāb- (to bend) (compare Lithuanian kabė (hook), Old Church Slavonic кѫпъ (kǫpŭ, hill, island)). More at camp.

Noun

hoop (plural hoops)

  1. A circular band of metal used to bind a barrel.
  2. A ring; a circular band; anything resembling a hoop.
    the cheese hoop, or cylinder in which the curd is pressed in making cheese
  3. A circular band of metal, wood, or similar material used for forming part of a framework such as an awning or tent.
  4. (now chiefly historical) A circle, or combination of circles, of thin whalebone, metal, or other elastic material, used for expanding the skirts of ladies’ dresses; (hence, by extension) a hoop petticoat or hoop skirt.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 16:
      He took the removed chair and drew it so near mine, squatting in it with his ugly weight, that he pressed upon my hoop.
  5. A quart pot; so called because originally bound with hoops, like a barrel. Also, a portion of the contents measured by the distance between the hoops.
  6. (Britain, obsolete) An old measure of capacity, variously estimated at from one to four pecks.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  7. (basketball) The rim part of a basketball net.
  8. (US, in the plural, metonymically) The game of basketball.
  9. A hoop earring.
  10. (sports, usually in the plural) A horizontal stripe on the jersey.
    • 2003 May 21, Barry Glendenning “Minute-by-minute: Celtic 2 – 3 FC Porto (AET)” The Guardian (London):
      Porto are playing from right to left in blue and white stripes, blue shorts and blue socks. Celtic are in their usual green and white hoops, with white shorts and white socks.
    • 2009 June 20, Ian O’Riordan “Tipperary look in better shape” The Irish Times:
      Tipperary v Clare: IF ANYTHING can relight the fire of the old Clare hurling passion it’s the sight of the blue jersey with the gold hoop.
  11. (Australia, metonymically, slang, by extension) A jockey.
    • 2011, James Morton, ‎Susanna Lobez, Kings of Stings: The Greatest Swindles from Down Under
      The stewards ordered Des Coleman, the senior hoop (jockey) present, to ride and he got the horse home in a photo-finish.
  12. (figuratively, usually in the plural) An obstacle that must be overcome in order to proceed.
Derived terms
  • hula hoop
  • jump through hoops
Translations

Verb

hoop (third-person singular simple present hoops, present participle hooping, simple past and past participle hooped)

  1. (transitive) To bind or fasten using a hoop.
  2. (transitive) To clasp; to encircle; to surround.
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

hoop (plural hoops)

  1. A shout; a whoop, as in whooping cough.
  2. The hoopoe.

Verb

hoop (third-person singular simple present hoops, present participle hooping, simple past and past participle hooped)

  1. (dated) To utter a loud cry, or a sound imitative of the word, by way of call or pursuit; to shout.
  2. (dated) To whoop, as in whooping cough.
Derived terms
  • hooping cough
  • hooper

Further reading

  • hoop on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

Anagrams

  • Pooh, ooph, phoo, pooh

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦʊə̯p/

Etymology 1

From Dutch hoop, from Middle Dutch hôop, from Old Dutch *hōp, from Proto-Germanic *haupaz.

Noun

hoop (plural hope, diminutive hopie)

  1. heap
Derived terms
  • ophoop

Etymology 2

From Dutch hoop, from Middle Dutch hope, from Old Dutch *hopa.

Noun

hoop (uncountable)

  1. hope

Etymology 3

From Dutch hopen, from Middle Dutch hōpen, from Old Dutch hopon, from Proto-West Germanic *hopōn.

Verb

hoop (present hoop, present participle hopende, past participle gehoop)

  1. to hope

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦoːp/
  • Hyphenation: hoop
  • Rhymes: -oːp

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch hope, from Old Dutch *hopa, from the verb hopon (modern Dutch hopen). Cognate with English hope.

Noun

hoop f (uncountable)

  1. A hope, aspiration, wish
Antonyms
  • (hope): wanhoop
Derived terms
  • hopeloos
  • hoopgevend
  • hoopvol
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: hoop

Verb

hoop

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hopen
  2. imperative of hopen

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch hôop, from Old Dutch *hōp, from Proto-Germanic *haupaz.

Noun

hoop m (plural hopen, diminutive hoopje n)

  1. A pile, heap, stack
    Synonyms: berg, stapel
  2. (figuratively) A lot, heaps
  3. A pile of manure, faeces
  4. A mass.
    Synonym: massa
  5. A multitude, a throng.
    Synonyms: drom, massa, menigte, schare
  6. (obsolete) A unit of soldiers, a contingent.
Synonyms
  • berg
  • massa
  • stapel
Derived terms

Descendants

  • Negerhollands: hoop, hoopje
  • Papiamentu: hoopi (from the diminutive)

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *hōp, from Proto-West Germanic *haup, from Proto-Germanic *haupaz.

Noun

hôop m

  1. heap, pile
  2. group of people or animals, troop, herd
  3. meeting

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms

  • hôpen

Descendants

  • Dutch: hoop
  • Limburgish: houp

Further reading

  • “hoop”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “hoop (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

West Frisian

Etymology

See hoopje (to hope)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hoːp/

Noun

hoop n (no plural)

  1. hope

Alternative forms

  • hope

Further reading

  • “hoop”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011


English

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French wiket, from Old Norse (specifically, Old East Norse) víkjas, diminutive of vik. Compare modern French guichet, ultimately from the same Old Norse source.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈwɪkɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪkɪt

Noun

wicket (plural wickets)

  1. A small door or gate, especially one beside a larger one.
  2. A small window or other opening, sometimes fitted with a grating.
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 386:
      As he did so he heard the shuffle of footsteps entering the chapel and the clicking of the confessional wicket.
  3. (Britain) A service window, as in a bank or train station, where a customer conducts transactions with a teller; #* 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
    • Watt climbed the stone steps and stood before the wicket, looking through its bars. He admired the permanent way, stretching away on either hand, in the moonlight, and the starlight, as far as the eye could reach, as far as Watt’s eye could have reached, if it had been inside the station.

a ticket barrier at a rail station, box office at a cinema, etc.

  1. (cricket) One of the two wooden structures at each end of the pitch, consisting of three vertical stumps and two bails; the target for the bowler, defended by the batsman.
  2. (cricket) A dismissal; the act of a batsman getting out.
  3. (cricket) The period during which two batsmen bat together.
  4. (cricket) The pitch.
  5. (cricket) The area around the stumps where the batsmen stand.
  6. (croquet) Any of the small arches through which the balls are driven.
  7. (skiing, snowboarding) A temporary metal attachment that one attaches one’s lift-ticket to.
  8. (US, dialect) A shelter made from tree boughs, used by lumbermen.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bartlett to this entry?)
  9. (mining) The space between the pillars, in post-and-stall working.
  10. (Internet, informal) An angle bracket when used in HTML.
  11. (veterinary) A device to measure the height of animals, usually dogs.

Derived terms

  • on a good wicket
  • sticky wicket
  • wicket gate

Translations

References


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