hooter vs snout what difference

what is difference between hooter and snout

English

Etymology

hoot +‎ -er

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhuː.tə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhu.tɚ/, [ˈhu.ɾɚ]
  • Hyphenation: hoot‧er
  • Rhymes: -uːtə(r)

Noun

hooter (plural hooters)

  1. A person who hoots.
  2. The horn in a motor vehicle.
  3. (Britain) A siren or steam whistle, especially one in a factory and used to indicate the beginning or the end of a working day or shift.
  4. (slang) A nose, especially a large one. [from 1950s]
  5. (slang, usually in the plural) A woman’s breast. [from 1970s]
  6. (slang) A penis. [from 1990s]
  7. An owl.
  8. (slang) A large cannabis cigarette.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:nose
  • See also Thesaurus:breasts
  • See also Thesaurus:penis

Translations

Further reading

  • hooter at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Te Horo


English

Etymology

From Middle English snowte, snoute, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German snute (alternatively spelled snuut, snuyt), lastly from Proto-Germanic *snūtaz, but further origin unknown. Compare Saterland Frisian Snuute, Dutch snuit or snoet (snout; cute face), German Schnauze, Schnute. Doublet of snoot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /snaʊt/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /snʌʊt/
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

Noun

snout (plural snouts)

  1. The long, projecting nose, mouth, and jaw of a beast, as of pigs.
  2. The front of the prow of a ship or boat. [First attested in 1387.]
  3. (derogatory) A person’s nose.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      The bitter laugh laughs at that which is not good, it is the ethical laugh. The hollow laugh laughs at that which is not true, it is the intellectual laugh. Not good! Not true! Well well. But the mirthless laugh is the dianoetic laugh, down the snout — Haw! — so.
  4. The nozzle of a pipe, hose, etc.
  5. The anterior prolongation of the head of a gastropod; a rostrum.
  6. The anterior prolongation of the head of weevils and allied beetles; a rostrum.
  7. (Britain, slang) Tobacco; cigarettes.
    • 1967, Len Deighton, Only When I Larf
      (Bob, p. 55:) Charlie was the most vicious screw on the block … He caught me with the two ounces of snout right in my hand, caught me by the hair, and swung me round in the exercise yard …
      (Spider, p. 175:) She brings me snout and sweets, and sometimes a cake from Mum.
    • 1982, Edward Bond, Saved
      LIZ. I only got one left. / FRED (calls). Get us some snout. / MIKE. Five or ten?
    • 2000, Joe Randolph Ackerley, P N Furbank, We Think the World of You
      Also he was “doing his nut” for some “snout.” I said I would provide cigarettes.
    • 2004, Allan Sillitoe, New and Collected Stories
      Raymond rolled a neat cigarette. “What about some snout, then?” “No, thanks.” He laughed. Smoke drifted from his open mouth.
  8. The terminus of a glacier.
  9. (slang) A police informer.
  10. A butterfly in the nymphalid subfamily Libytheinae, notable for the snout-like elongation on their heads.

Translations

Verb

snout (third-person singular simple present snouts, present participle snouting, simple past and past participle snouted)

  1. To furnish with a nozzle or point.

Further reading

  • snout (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

Anagrams

  • Notus, Tuson, noust, nouts, nutso, tonus

Middle English

Noun

snout

  1. Alternative form of snowte

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