hop vs skip what difference

what is difference between hop and skip

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /hɒp/
  • Rhymes: -ɒp
  • (US) IPA(key): /hɑp/

Etymology 1

From Middle English hoppen, from Old English hoppian (to hop, spring, leap, dance), from Proto-Germanic *huppōną (to hop), from Proto-Indo-European *kewb- (to bend, bow). Cognate with Dutch hoppen (to hop), German hopfen, hoppen (to hop), Swedish hoppa (to hop, leap, jump), Icelandic hoppa (to hop, skip).

Noun

hop (plural hops)

  1. A short jump.
  2. A jump on one leg.
  3. A short journey, especially in the case of air travel, one that take place on a private plane.
  4. (sports, US) A bounce, especially from the ground, of a thrown or batted ball.
  5. (US, dated) A dance; a gathering for the purpose of dancing.
  6. (networking) The sending of a data packet from one host to another as part of its overall journey.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

hop (third-person singular simple present hops, present participle hopping, simple past and past participle hopped)

  1. (intransitive) To jump a short distance.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter V
      When it had advanced from the wood, it hopped much after the fashion of a kangaroo, using its hind feet and tail to propel it, and when it stood erect, it sat upon its tail.
    Synonyms: jump, leap
  2. (intransitive) To jump on one foot.
  3. (intransitive) To be in state of energetic activity.
  4. (transitive) To suddenly take a mode of transportation that one does not drive oneself, often surreptitiously.
  5. (transitive) To jump onto, or over
  6. (intransitive, usually in combination) To move frequently from one place or situation to another similar one.
  7. (obsolete) To walk lame; to limp.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  8. To dance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smollett to this entry?)
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English hoppe, from Middle Dutch hoppe, from Old Dutch *hoppo, from Proto-Germanic *huppô. Cognate with German Hopfen and French houblon.

Noun

hop (plural hops)

  1. The plant (Humulus lupulus) from whose flowers beer or ale is brewed.
  2. (usually in the plural) The flowers of the hop plant, dried and used to brew beer etc.
  3. (US, slang) Opium, or some other narcotic drug.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:opium
    • 1940, Raymond Chandler, Farewell, My Lovely, Penguin 2010, p. 177:
      ‘You’ve been shot full of hop and kept under it until you’re as crazy as two waltzing mice.’
  4. The fruit of the dog rose; a hip.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

hop (third-person singular simple present hops, present participle hopping, simple past and past participle hopped)

  1. (transitive) To impregnate with hops, especially to add hops as a flavouring agent during the production of beer
  2. (intransitive) To gather hops.

Anagrams

  • OHP, PHO, POH, Pho, pOH, pho, poh

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hopp (jump).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɔp/, [hʌb̥]

Noun

hop n (singular definite hoppet, plural indefinite hop)

  1. jump
Inflection

Etymology 2

See hoppe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɔp/, [hʌb̥]

Verb

hop

  1. imperative of hoppe

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦɔp/
  • Hyphenation: hop
  • Rhymes: -ɔp

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch hoppe, ultimately from Latin upupa (hoopoe), which may have been borrowed through Old French huppe.

Noun

hop m (plural hoppen, diminutive hopje n)

  1. hoopoe, the species Upupa epops or an individual of this species
  2. any bird of the family Upupidae

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch hoppe, from Old Dutch *hoppo, from Proto-Germanic *huppô (hops), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keup (tuft, hair of the head), referring to the plant’s appearance. Compare Old Saxon hoppo, Old High German hopfo, Middle English hoppe.

Noun

hop f (uncountable)

  1. hop, Humulus lupulus
Derived terms
  • drooghoppen
  • hoppig
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: hop
  • Japanese: ホップ

Etymology 3

From hoppen, huppen (to hop).

Interjection

hop

  1. go, get going

Noun

hop m (plural hoppen, diminutive hopje n)

  1. a hop, a short jump

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “hop”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Finnish

Etymology

Either a clipping of hoppu, or directly from Swedish hopp (jump). Consider also the synonym hopoti (horse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhop/, [ˈho̞p]
  • Rhymes: -op
  • Syllabification: hop

Interjection

hop

  1. General spurring interjection.
  2. Used to entice a horse into a run.
    • 1913 SKVR VIII 1625. Piikkiö. Häyrinen Kalle 8. 13.
      Hop humma Huttalaan, / parastelle Pappilaa, / Pappilasta Koroissii, / Koroissista Käräjiin,

      Hop horse to Huttala …
    • 1913 SKVR IX1 352. Renko. Salo Aukusti. HO 24 239. 13.
      Mee ny kuultaan kirkonkellot. / Muut kuulee karjan kellot / Hop tamma / Ei ilman haluta / Jos ei poika likkaa taluta.

      Hop mare …
    • 1915 SKVR XIV 1026. Myrskylä. Salminen, T. 117. 15.
      Hop hoppa kirkkoo! / Aja mummun aitan etee / Saat voitakaakkuu

      Hop horse to church / Run to the front of grandmother’s granary …

Synonyms

  • hopoti
  • hopoti hoi

Related terms

  • hopo
  • hoppa
  • hopotiti hoi
  • hoputtaa

French

Pronunciation

  • (aspirated h) IPA(key): /ɔp/

Interjection

hop

  1. Voila!, hey presto!

Further reading

  • “hop” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch hoofd (head).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hop/
  • Hyphenation: hop

Noun

hop

  1. head, (of an organisation), chief, boss
    Synonym: kepala

Further reading

  • “hop” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Irish

Noun

hop m (genitive singular hop, nominative plural hopanna)

  1. Alternative form of hap (hop; blow)

Declension

Further reading

  • “hop” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse hópr.

Noun

hop m (definite singular hopen, indefinite plural hoper, definite plural hopene)

  1. heap, pile, crowd, multitude, cluster

Derived terms

  • stjernehop

References

  • “hop” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse hópr. Akin to English heap

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huːp/

Noun

hop m (definite singular hopen, indefinite plural hopar, definite plural hopane)

  1. flock, heap, gathering

Derived terms

References

  • “hop” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Southern Ohlone

Noun

hop

  1. redwood tree

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse hópr

Pronunciation

Noun

hop c

  1. heap, collection; a whole bunch

Related terms

  • hopa


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: skĭp, IPA(key): /skɪp/
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Etymology 1

From Middle English skippen, skyppen, of North Germanic origin, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *skupjaną, *skupaną (to scoff, mock), perhaps related to *skeubaną (to drive, push). Related to Icelandic skopa (to take a run), Middle Swedish skuppa (to skip).

Verb

skip (third-person singular simple present skips, present participle skipping, simple past and past participle skipped)

  1. (intransitive) To move by hopping on alternate feet.
    She will skip from one end of the sidewalk to the other.
  2. (intransitive) To leap about lightly.
    • So she drew her mother away skipping, dancing, and frisking fantastically.
  3. (intransitive) To skim, ricochet or bounce over a surface.
    The rock will skip across the pond.
  4. (transitive) To throw (something), making it skim, ricochet, or bounce over a surface.
    I bet I can skip this rock to the other side of the pond.
  5. (transitive) To disregard, miss or omit part of a continuation (some item or stage).
    My heart will skip a beat.
    I will read most of the book, but skip the first chapter because the video covered it.
    • 1684-1690, Thomas Burnet, Sacred Theory of the Earth
      But they who have not this doubt, and have a mind to see the issue of the Theory, may skip these two Chapters, if they please, and proceed to the following
  6. To place an item in a skip.
  7. (transitive, informal) Not to attend (some event, especially a class or a meeting).
    Yeah, I really should go to the quarterly meeting but I think I’m going to skip it.
  8. (transitive, informal) To leave, especially in a sudden and covert manner.
    • 1998, Baha Men, Who Let the Dogs Out?
      I see ya’ little speed boat head up our coast
      She really want to skip town
      Get back off me, beast off me
      Get back you flea-infested mongrel
  9. To leap lightly over.
    to skip the rope
  10. To jump rope.
    The girls were skipping in the playground.
  11. (knitting, crocheting) To pass by a stitch as if it were not there, continuing with the next stitch.
  12. (printing) To have insufficient ink transfer.
    Antonym: stack
Synonyms
  • (informal, not to attend): (US) play hookie
Translations

Noun

skip (plural skips)

  1. A leaping, jumping or skipping movement.
  2. The act of passing over an interval from one thing to another; an omission of a part.
  3. (music) A passage from one sound to another by more than a degree at once.
  4. A person who attempts to disappear so as not to be found.
    • 2012, Susan Nash, Skip Tracing Basics and Beyond (page 19)
      Tracking down debtors is a big part of a skip tracer’s job. That’s the case because deadbeats who haven’t paid their bills and have disappeared are the most common type of skips.
  5. (radio) skywave propagation
Derived terms
  • skip bombing
  • skipping rope
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English skep, skeppe, from Old English sceppe, from Old Norse skeppa (basket).

Noun

skip (plural skips)

  1. (Australia, New Zealand, Britain) A large open-topped container for waste, designed to be lifted onto the back of a truck to remove it along with its contents. (see also skep).
  2. (mining) A transportation container in a mine, usually for ore or mullock.
  3. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) A skep, or basket.
  4. A wheeled basket used in cotton factories.
  5. (sugar manufacture) A charge of syrup in the pans.
  6. A beehive.
Synonyms
  • (open-topped rubbish bin): dumpster (Canada, US)
Translations

Etymology 3

Late Middle English skillper, borrowed from Middle Dutch and Middle Low German schipper (captain), earlier “seaman”, from schip (ship).

Noun

skip (plural skips)

  1. Short for skipper, the master or captain of a ship, or other person in authority.
  2. (specially) The captain of a sports team. Also, a form of address by the team to the captain.
  3. (curling) The player who calls the shots and traditionally throws the last two rocks.
  4. (bowls) The captain of a bowls team, who directs the team’s tactics and rolls the side’s last wood, so as to be able to retrieve a difficult situation if necessary.
  5. (Scouting, informal) The scoutmaster of a troop of scouts (youth organization) and their form of address to him.
Translations

Etymology 4

A reference to the television series Skippy the Bush Kangaroo; coined and used by Australians (particularly children) of non-British descent to counter derogatory terms aimed at them. Ultimately from etymology 1 (above).

Alternative forms

  • skippy

Noun

skip (plural skips)

  1. (Australia, slang) An Australian of Anglo-Celtic descent.
    • 2001, Effie (character played by Mary Coustas), Effie: Just Quietly (TV series), Episode: Nearest and Dearest,
      Effie: How did you find the second, the defacto, and what nationality is she?
      Barber: She is Australian.
      Effie: Is she? Gone for a skip. You little radical you.
Translations

See also

  • limey
  • wog

Etymology 5

17th-century Ireland. Possibly a clipping of skip-kennel (young lackey or assistant). Used at Trinity College Dublin.

Noun

skip (plural skips)

  1. (college slang) A college servant.
Related terms
  • gyp (Cambridge University)
  • scout (Oxford University)

References

Anagrams

  • KPIs, kips

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch schip.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skəp/

Noun

skip (plural skepe, diminutive skippie or skepie)

  1. ship

Derived terms

  • oorlogskip
  • seilskip
  • stoomskip
  • vliegdekskip
  • vragskip

Descendants

  • Northern Ndebele: isikepe
  • Shona: chikepe
  • Sotho: sekepe
  • Tsonga: xikepe
  • Xhosa: isikhephe
  • Zulu: isikebhe

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse skip, from Proto-Germanic *skipą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃiːp/
  • Rhymes: -iːp

Noun

skip n (genitive singular skips, plural skip)

  1. ship

Declension

Derived terms

Anagrams

  • kips
  • spik

Gothic

Romanization

skip

  1. Romanization of ????????????????

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse skip, from Proto-Germanic *skipą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [scɪːp]
  • Rhymes: -ɪːp

Noun

skip n (genitive singular skips, nominative plural skip)

  1. ship, boat

Declension

Synonyms

  • (ship, boat): bátur m, gnoð f, kafs hestur m

Derived terms

  • flaggskip
  • geimskip

Anagrams

  • spik

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse skip, from Proto-Germanic *skipą. Cognate with Danish skib, Swedish skepp, Icelandic skip, Gothic ???????????????? (skip), German Schiff, Dutch schip, and English ship.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃiːp/

Noun

skip n (definite singular skipet, indefinite plural skip, definite plural skipa or skipene)

  1. ship

Synonyms

  • båt

Derived terms

References

  • “skip” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse skip, from Proto-Germanic *skipą. Akin to English ship.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃiːp/

Noun

skip n (definite singular skipet, indefinite plural skip, definite plural skipa)

  1. ship

Synonyms

  • båt

Derived terms

For other terms please refer to skip (Bokmål) for the time being.

References

  • “skip” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *skipą, whence also Old English scip (English ship), Old Saxon skip, Old High German skif, Gothic ???????????????? (skip).

Noun

skip n (genitive skips, plural skip)

  1. ship

Declension

Derived terms

  • skipari

Descendants

References

  • skip in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *skip, from Proto-Germanic *skipą, whence also Old English sċip, Old Frisian skip, Old High German skif, Old Norse skip.

Noun

skip n

  1. ship

Declension


Descendants

  • Middle Low German: schip, schep
    • German Low German: Schipp, Schepp

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian skip, from Proto-West Germanic *skip, from Proto-Germanic *skipą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skɪp/

Noun

skip n (plural skippen, diminutive skipke)

  1. ship
  2. shipload
  3. nave (of a church)

Further reading

  • “skip (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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