horn vs trump what difference

what is difference between horn and trump

English

Etymology

From Middle English horn, horne, from Old English horn, from Proto-West Germanic *horn, from Proto-Germanic *hurną. Compare West Frisian hoarn, Dutch hoorn, Low German Hoorn, horn, German Horn, Danish and Swedish horn, Gothic ???????????????????? (haurn).

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱr̥h₂-nó-m, from *ḱerh₂- (head, horn). Compare Breton kern (horn), Latin cornū, Ancient Greek κέρας (kéras), Proto-Slavic *sьrna, Old Church Slavonic сьрна (sĭrna, roedeer), Hittite [script needed] (surna, horn), Persian سور(sur), Sanskrit शृङ्ग (śṛṅga, horn).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hôn, IPA(key): /hɔːn/
  • (US) enPR: hôrn, IPA(key): /hɔɹn/
  • (Dublin English, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /ˈhɒːɹn/
  • (Dublin English) IPA(key): /ˈhoːrn/, /ˈhoːɻn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(r)n

Noun

horn (countable and uncountable, plural horns)

  1. (countable) A hard growth of keratin that protrudes from the top of the head of certain animals, usually paired.
  2. Any similar real or imaginary growth or projection such as the elongated tusk of a narwhal, the eyestalk of a snail, the pointed growth on the nose of a rhinoceros, or the hornlike projection on the head of a demon or similar.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      But nowhere are there queerer waters than in our own parish of Caulds, at the place called the Sker Bay, where between two horns of land a shallow estuary receives the stream of the Sker.
  3. An antler.
  4. (uncountable) The hard substance from which animals’ horns are made, sometimes used by man as a material for making various objects.
    Synonym: keratin
  5. An object whose shape resembles a horn, such as cornucopia, the point of an anvil, or a vessel for gunpowder or liquid.
    • 1775, William Mason, The Poems of Mr. Gray. To which are prefixed Memoirs of his Life and Writings by W. Mason.
    1. The high pommel of a saddle; also, either of the projections on a lady’s saddle for supporting the leg.
    2. (architecture) The Ionic volute.
    3. (nautical) The outer end of a crosstree; also, one of the projections forming the jaws of a gaff, boom, etc.
    4. (carpentry) A curved projection on the fore part of a plane.
    5. One of the projections at the four corners of the Jewish altar of burnt offering.
  6. (countable) Any of several musical wind instruments.
  7. (countable, music) An instrument resembling a musical horn and used to signal others.
  8. (countable, automotive) A loud alarm, especially one on a motor vehicle.
    Synonyms: hooter, klaxon
  9. (chiefly sports) A sound signaling the expiration of time.
    The shot was after the horn and therefore did not count.
  10. (countable) A conical device used to direct waves.
    Synonym: funnel
  11. (informal, music, countable) Generally, any brass wind instrument.
  12. (slang, countable, from the horn-shaped earpieces of old communication systems that used air tubes) A telephone.
    Synonyms: blower (UK), dog and bone (Cockney rhyming slang), phone
  13. (uncountable, vulgar, slang, definite article) An erection of the penis.
    Synonyms: boner (US), hard-on, stiffy
  14. (countable, geography) A peninsula or crescent-shaped tract of land.
    Synonym: peninsula
  15. (countable) A diacritical mark that may be attached to the top right corner of the letters o and u when writing in Vietnamese, thus forming ơ and ư.
  16. (botany) An incurved, tapering and pointed appendage found in the flowers of the milkweed (Asclepias).

Usage notes

When used alone to refer to an instrument, horn can mean either hunting horn or French horn, depending on context. Other instruments are identified by specific adjectives such as English horn or basset horn.

Translations

Verb

horn (third-person singular simple present horns, present participle horning, simple past and past participle horned)

  1. (transitive, of an animal) To assault with the horns.
  2. (transitive) To furnish with horns.
  3. (transitive, slang, obsolete) To cuckold.

Derived terms

Anagrams

  • NRHO, Rohn

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse horn, from Proto-Norse ᚺᛟᚱᚾᚨ (horna), from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-.

Noun

horn n (singular definite hornet, plural indefinite horn)

  1. horn

Inflection

References

  • “horn” in Den Danske Ordbog

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse horn, from Proto-Norse ᚺᛟᚱᚾᚨ (horna), from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɔtn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔtn

Noun

horn n (genitive singular horns, plural horn)

  1. horn (of an animal)
  2. (music) horn
  3. corner
  4. speaker (on a telephone)
  5. angle

Declension


Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse horn, from Proto-Norse ᚺᛟᚱᚾᚨ (horna), from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɔrtn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔrtn

Noun

horn n (genitive singular horns, nominative plural horn)

  1. horn (of an animal)
  2. fin (of a cetacean or other marine animal)
  3. corner
  4. angle
  5. (music) horn

Declension

Derived terms


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • horne, orn

Etymology

From Old English horn, from Proto-West Germanic *horn, from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱr̥h₂nós (with change in gender).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɔrn/

Noun

horn (plural hornes)

  1. A horn (keratinous growth on one’s head):
    1. A horn or a similar growth in fantasy, religion, or mythology.
    2. Such keratinous growths used as a material or in crafts.
    3. (rare) The metaphorical horn of one who performs cuckoldry.
    4. (rare, heraldry) A heraldic depiction of a horn.
  2. A jutting or projecting extremity of something, especially one resembling a horn:
    1. One of the two points of a moon that is less than half waxed.
    2. One of the two points of a women’s hairstyle involving projecting points.
    3. (rare, anatomy) A horn-shaped bodily passage or chamber.
  3. A horn (gently curved musical instrument)
  4. Any other hard bodily extension in humans or beasts (e.g. a claw)
  5. A horn-shaped container, especially one used like a glass.
  6. (rare) A half or section of an army, troop, or band.
  7. (rare) The eyestalk of a gastropod or an analogous projection.
  8. (rare) Bovids which are horned as a collective.

Related terms

  • horned
  • hornen
  • hornepipe
  • horner
  • hornyng
  • ynkhorn

Descendants

  • English: horn
  • Scots: horn
  • Yola: hoorn

References

  • “horn, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-12-08.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse horn, from Proto-Norse ᚺᛟᚱᚾᚨ (horna), from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-.

Noun

horn n (definite singular hornet, indefinite plural horn, definite plural horna or hornene)

  1. (zoology) horn
  2. (music) horn
  3. (automotive, rail transport) horn (warning device)

Derived terms

  • hornhinne
  • krutthorn
  • ta tyren ved hornene

References

  • “horn” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse horn, from Proto-Norse ᚺᛟᚱᚾᚨ (horna), from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hʊrn/, /hɔrn/

Noun

horn n (definite singular hornet, indefinite plural horn, definite plural horna)

  1. (zoology) horn
  2. (music) horn
  3. (automotive, rail transport) horn (warning device)

Derived terms

  • hornhinne
  • ta tyren ved horna

References

  • “horn” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *horn, from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- (horn, head, top).

Compare Old Frisian horn (West Frisian hoarn), Old Saxon horn (Low German Hoorn, horn), Dutch hoorn, Old High German horn (German Horn), Old Norse horn (Danish and Swedish horn), Gothic ???????????????????? (haurn).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xorn/, [horˠn]

Noun

horn m (nominative plural hornas)

  1. horn
  2. (horn-shaped) gable

Declension

Derived terms

  • hornbǣre
  • hornreċed

Descendants

  • Middle English: horn, horne
    • English: horn

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *horn, from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-.

Cognates include also Old Saxon horn, Old English horn, Old Norse horn, Gothic ???????????????????? (haurn).

Noun

horn n

  1. horn

Descendants

  • German: Horn

Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Norse ᚺᛟᚱᚾᚨ (horna), from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- or Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂-. Cognates include Old English horn (English horn, Old Frisian horn (West Frisian hoarn), Old Saxon horn (Low German Hoorn, horn), Dutch hoorn, Old High German horn (German Horn), Gothic ???????????????????? (haurn).

Noun

horn n (genitive horns, plural horn)

  1. horn (of an animal)
  2. horn (to drink from)
  3. horn (musical instrument)
  4. corner
  5. angle

Declension

Descendants

  • Danish: horn n
  • Faroese: horn n
  • Icelandic: horn n
  • Norwegian: horn n
  • Swedish: horn n

References

  • horn in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *horn, from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-.

Cognates include also Old English horn, Old Frisian horn, Old High German horn, Old Norse horn, Gothic ???????????????????? (haurn).

Noun

horn n

  1. horn

Descendants

  • Low German: Hoorn, horn

Romanian

Noun

horn n (plural hornuri)

  1. chimney
    Synonyms: cămin, coș, fumar, hogeag

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse horn, from Proto-Norse ᚺᛟᚱᚾᚨ (horna), from Proto-Germanic *hurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂-.

Pronunciation

Noun

horn n

  1. horn (growth on animals’ heads)
  2. horn (object shaped from or like an animal’s horn, used for drinking, storage or making sounds)
  3. horn (object that makes a sound, e.g. on a car)
  4. (music) horn

Declension

Related terms



English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɹʌmp/
  • (some accents) IPA(key): [t͡ʃɹʌmp]
  • Rhymes: -ʌmp
  • Homophone: Trump

Etymology 1

Possibly from French triomphe (triumph) or Old French triumphe.

Noun

trump (plural trumps)

  1. (card games) The suit, in a game of cards, that outranks all others.
    Diamonds were declared trump(s).
  2. (card games) A playing card of that suit.
    He played an even higher trump.
  3. (figuratively) Something that gives one an advantage, especially one held in reserve.
  4. (colloquial, now rare) An excellent person; a fine fellow, a good egg.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 13
      All hands voted Queequeg a noble trump; the captain begged his pardon.
    • 1869, Louisa May Alcott, Little Women, pg 19 and 163
      Brooke was a trump to telegraph right off.
    • Alfred is a trump, I think you say.
  5. An old card game, almost identical to whist; the game of ruff.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Decker to this entry?)
  6. A card of the major arcana of the tarot.
Usage notes

For the top-ranking suit as a whole, American usage favors the singular trump and British usage the plural trumps.

Translations

Verb

trump (third-person singular simple present trumps, present participle trumping, simple past and past participle trumped)

  1. (transitive, card games) To play on (a card of another suit) with a trump.
    He knew the hand was lost when his ace was trumped.
  2. (intransitive, card games) To play a trump, or to take a trick with a trump.
  3. (transitive) To get the better of, or finesse, a competitor.
    • , Act 1, Scene 3
      to trick or trump mankind
  4. (transitive, dated) To impose unfairly; to palm off.
    • 1699, Charles Leslie, A Short and Easy Method with the Deists
      Authors have been trumped upon us.
  5. (transitive) To supersede.
    In this election, it would seem issues of national security trumped economic issues.
  6. (transitive) To outweigh; be stronger, greater, bigger than or in other way superior to.
Synonyms
  • (to play a trump card on another suit): ruff
  • (to get the better of a competitor): outsmart
Coordinate terms
  • (to play a trump card on another suit): underruff, overruff
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English trumpe, trompe (trumpet) from Old French trompe (horn, trump, trumpet), from Frankish *trumpa, *trumba (trumpet), from a common Germanic word of imitative origin.

Akin to Old High German trumpa, trumba (horn, trumpet), Middle Dutch tromme (drum), Middle Low German trumme (drum). More at trumpet, drum.

Noun

trump (plural trumps)

  1. (archaic) A trumpet.
    • 1611, King James Bible, 1 Corinthians 15:52:
      In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible
    • 1798, Joseph Hopkinson, “Hail, Columbia”:
      Sound, sound the trump of fame,
  2. (slang, Britain, childish, vulgar) Flatulence.
  3. The noise made by an elephant through its trunk.
Derived terms

Verb

trump (third-person singular simple present trumps, present participle trumping, simple past and past participle trumped)

  1. To blow a trumpet.
  2. (intransitive, slang, Britain, childish, vulgar) To flatulate.
    And without warning me, as he lay there, he suddenly trumped next to me in bed.

Etymology 3

Shortening of Jew’s-trump, which may be from French jeu-trump, jeu tromp, jeu trompe (a trump, or toy, to play with).

Noun

trump (plural trumps)

  1. (dated, music) Synonym of Jew’s harp.

Further reading

  • Trump in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

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