horrific vs outrageous what difference

what is difference between horrific and outrageous

English

Alternative forms

  • horrifick (obsolete)

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin horrificus, from horreō (to be afraid) + -ficō (to make).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /həˈɹɪfɪk/, /hɔˈɹɪfɪk/, /hɑˈɹɪfɪk/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /həˈɹɪfɪk/, /hɒˈɹɪfɪk/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /hɘˈɹɘfɘk/, /hɔˈɹɘfɘk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪfɪk

Adjective

horrific (comparative more horrific, superlative most horrific)

  1. Horrifying, causing horror; horrible.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:frightening

Usage notes

  • Like many terms that start with a non-silent h but have emphasis on their second syllable, some people precede horrific with an, others with a.

Related terms

  • horrible
  • horrifical
  • horrification
  • horrify
  • horror
  • horrendous

Translations



English

Alternative forms

  • outragious (archaic)

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman outrageus, Middle French outrageus, from outrage; equivalent to outrage +‎ -ous.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /aʊtˈɹeɪdʒəs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒəs

Adjective

outrageous (comparative more outrageous, superlative most outrageous)

  1. Violating morality or decency; provoking indignation or affront. [from 14th c.]
    • c. 1601, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, First Folio 1623:
      To be, or not to be, that is the Question: / Whether ’tis Nobler in the minde to suffer / The Slings and Arrowes of outragious Fortune, / Or to take Armes against a Sea of troubles, / And by opposing end them […].
    • 2011, Paul Wilson, The Guardian, 19 Oct 2011:
      The Irish-French rugby union whistler Alain Rolland was roundly condemned for his outrageous decision that lifting a player into the air then turning him over so he falls on his head or neck amounted to dangerous play.
  2. Transgressing reasonable limits; extravagant, immoderate. [from 14th c.]
    • 2004, David Smith, The Observer, 19 Dec 2004:
      Audience members praised McKellen, best known for Shakespearean roles and as Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings, for his show-stealing turn as Twankey in a series of outrageous glitzy dresses.
  3. Shocking; exceeding conventional behaviour; provocative. [from 18th c.]
    • 2001, Imogen Tilden, The Guardian, 8 Dec 2001:
      “It’s something I really am quite nervous about,” he admits, before adding, with relish: “You have to be a bit outrageous and challenging sometimes.”
  4. (now rare) Fierce, violent. [from 14th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.4:
      For els my feeble vessell, crazd and crackt / Through thy strong buffets and outrageous blowes, / Cannot endure, but needes it must be wrackt […].

Derived terms

  • outrageously
  • outrageousness

Related terms

  • outrage

Translations

Further reading

  • outrageous in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • outrageous in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial