horror vs repulsion what difference

what is difference between horror and repulsion

English

Alternative forms

  • horrour (UK, hypercorrect spelling or archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English horer, horrour, from Old French horror, from Latin horror (a bristling, a shaking, trembling as with cold or fear, terror), from horrere (to bristle, shake, be terrified). Displaced native Old English ōga.

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Canada) IPA(key): /ˈhɔɹ.ɚ/
    • (NYC, Philadelphia) IPA(key): /ˈhɑɹ.ɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation, New England) IPA(key): /ˈhɒɹ.ə/
  • Rhymes: -ɒɹə(ɹ)

Noun

horror (countable and uncountable, plural horrors)

  1. (countable, uncountable) An intense distressing emotion of fear or repugnance.
  2. (countable, uncountable) Something horrible; that which excites horror.
    I saw many horrors during the war.
  3. (countable, uncountable) Intense dislike or aversion; an abhorrence.
  4. (uncountable) A genre of fiction designed to evoke a feeling of fear and suspense.
  5. (countable) An individual work in this genre.
    • 2006, Pierluigi on Cinema
      [] there were hastily produced B movies, such as the peplums, the spaghetti westerns, the detective stories, the horrors.
  6. (countable, colloquial) A nasty or ill-behaved person; a rascal or terror.
    The neighbour’s kids are a pack of little horrors!
  7. (informal) An intense anxiety or a nervous depression; often the horrors.
  8. (in the plural, informal) Delirium tremens.

Synonyms

  • nightmare

Hypernyms

  • speculative fiction

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • horror in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • horror in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • horror at OneLook Dictionary Search

Galician

Etymology

From Latin horror.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɔˈroɾ]

Noun

horror m (plural horrores)

  1. horror
    Synonyms: espanto, pavor, terror

Related terms

References

  • “horror” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “horror” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin horror.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhorːor]
  • Hyphenation: hor‧ror
  • Rhymes: -or

Noun

horror (plural horrorok)

  1. horror

Declension

References


Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *horzōs. Equivalent to horreo +‎ -or.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈhor.ror/, [ˈhɔɾːɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈor.ror/, [ˈɔrːɔr]

Noun

horror m (genitive horrōris); third declension

  1. bristling (standing on end)
  2. shaking, shivering, chill
  3. dread, terror, horror

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Related terms

  • horrendus
  • horridus
  • horribilis

Descendants

References

  • horror in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • horror in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • horror in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Old French

Alternative forms

  • horrour
  • horrur

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin horror, horrorem.

Noun

horror f (oblique plural horrors, nominative singular horror, nominative plural horrors)

  1. horror or terror

Descendants

  • English: horror
  • Middle French: horreur
    • French: horreur

Polish

Etymology

From English horror, from Latin horror.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxɔr.rɔr/

Noun

horror m inan

  1. (colloquial) horror (something horrible; that which excites horror)
  2. (film) horror movie
    Synonym: film grozy
  3. (literature) horror

Declension

Further reading

  • horror in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • horror in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin horror, horrorem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ɔˈʁoɾ/
  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /oˈʁoʁ/
    • IPA(key): (São Paulo) /oˈʁoɾ/
  • Hyphenation: hor‧ror

Noun

horror m (plural horrores)

  1. horror
    Synonyms: temor, terror

Related terms

  • horrendo
  • hórrido
  • horrífero
  • horrífico
  • horripilar
  • horrível
  • horrorizar
  • horroroso

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin horror, horrorem.

Cf. also the popular Old Spanish horrura, inherited from a derivative of the Latin or with a change of suffix, and taking on the meaning of “dirtiness, filth, impurity, scum”; comparable to derivatives of horridus in other Romance languages, like Italian ordo, Old French ord, French ordure, Old Catalan hòrreu, horresa, Old Occitan orre, orrezeza, Romanian urdoare.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /oˈroɾ/, [oˈroɾ]

Noun

horror m (plural horrores)

  1. horror
    Synonyms: miedo, temor, terror

Related terms

References



English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French répulsion, from Late Latin repulsio, repulsionem, from Latin repulsus.

Noun

repulsion (countable and uncountable, plural repulsions)

  1. The act of repelling or the condition of being repelled.
  2. An extreme dislike of something, or hostility to something.
  3. (physics) The repulsive force acting between bodies of the same electric charge or magnetic polarity.

Antonyms

  • attraction

Related terms

  • repel
  • repulse
  • repulsive
  • repellent

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • neuropils, unspoiler

Piedmontese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /repylˈsjuŋ/

Noun

repulsion f

  1. repulsion

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