hose vs hosiery what difference

what is difference between hose and hosiery

English

Etymology

From Middle English hose (leggings, hose), from Old English hose, hosa (hose, leggings), from Proto-West Germanic *hosā, from Proto-Germanic *husǭ (coverings, leggings, trousers), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewH- (to cover).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /həʊz/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /hoʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz
  • Homophone: hoes

Noun

hose (countable and uncountable, plural hoses or hosen)

  1. (countable) A flexible tube conveying water or other fluid.
  2. (uncountable) A stocking-like garment worn on the legs; pantyhose, women’s tights.
  3. (obsolete) Close-fitting trousers or breeches, reaching to the knee.
    • These men were bound in their coates, their hosen, and their hats, and their other garments, and were cast into the midst of the burning fierie furnace.
    • His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide / For his shrunk shank,

Usage notes

  • (garment covering legs) Formerly a male garment covering the lower body, with the upper body covered by a doublet. By the 16th century hose had separated into two garments, stocken and breeches. Since the 1920s, hose refers mostly to women’s stockings or pantyhose

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

hose (third-person singular simple present hoses, present participle hosing, simple past and past participle hosed)

  1. (transitive) To water or spray with a hose.
  2. (transitive) To deliver using a hose.
  3. (transitive) To provide with hose (garment)
  4. (transitive) To attack and kill somebody, usually using a firearm.
  5. (transitive) To trick or deceive.
  6. (transitive, computing) To break a computer so everything needs to be reinstalled; to wipe all files.
  7. (transitive, sports) To cause an unfair disadvantage to a player or team through poor officiating; especially, to cause a player or team to lose the game with an incorrect call.

Derived terms

  • hose down
  • home and hosed

Translations

Anagrams

  • HEOs, Heos, Shoe, hoes, shoe

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hose, hosa, hosu, from Proto-West Germanic *hosā. Compare German Hose.

Alternative forms

  • (all rare) hoyse, hosa, hoose

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɔːz(ə)/

Noun

hose (plural hosen or hose or (rare) hoses)

  1. Stockings or tights (often worn by men in the ME period).
  2. (in the plural) pants, trousers; hose.
  3. Armour or protection for the legs; armoured legwear.
  4. (rare) The bendable outer casing of grains.
  5. (rare) A bendable tube for liquids; a hose.
  6. (rare) A bendable tube acting as a trap.
Related terms
  • hosen
  • hosyer
  • hosynge
  • taphose (possibly)
Descendants
  • English: hose
  • Scots: hose, hoe
References
  • “hōse, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-03-23.

Etymology 2

From hose (noun).

Verb

hose

  1. Alternative form of hosen

Etymology 3

Adjective

hose

  1. Alternative form of hos (hoarse)

Etymology 4

Adjective

hose

  1. inflection of hos (hoarse):
    1. weak singular
    2. strong/weak plural

Etymology 5

Pronoun

hose

  1. Alternative form of whos (whose, genitive)

Old English

Alternative forms

  • hosa, hosu

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *hosā.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxo.se/, [ˈho.ze]

Noun

hose f

  1. pant leg, stocking
  2. (in the plural) pants, trousers; hose

Declension

Synonyms

  • brōc

Derived terms

  • leþerhose

Descendants

  • Middle English: hose, hoyse, hosa, hoose
    • English: hose
    • Scots: hose, hoe


English

Etymology

hose +‎ -ery

Pronunciation

  • (US) enPR: hōʹzhərē, IPA(key): /ˈhoʊʒəɹi/

Noun

hosiery (usually uncountable, plural hosieries)

  1. Undergarments worn on the legs, such as socks, stockings, and pantyhose.
  2. (uncountable) The business or art of a hosier; the practice of making hose.
  3. (countable) A shop selling such undergarments.

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