host vs legion what difference

what is difference between host and legion

English

Alternative forms

  • hoast (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /həʊst/
  • (US) IPA(key): /hoʊst/
  • Rhymes: -əʊst

Etymology 1

From Middle English hoste, from Old French oste (French: hôte), from Latin hospitem, accusative of hospes (a host, also a sojourner, visitor, guest; hence, a foreigner, a stranger), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰostipotis (master of guests), from *gʰóstis (stranger, guest, enemy) and *pótis (owner, master, host, husband). Used in English since 13th century. Doublet of guest.

Noun

host (plural hosts, feminine hostess)

  1. One which receives or entertains a guest, socially, commercially, or officially.
  2. One that provides a facility for an event.
  3. A person or organization responsible for running an event.
  4. A moderator or master of ceremonies for a performance.
  5. (computing, Internet) Any computer attached to a network.
  6. (ecology) A cell or organism which harbors another organism or biological entity, usually a parasite.
  7. (evolution, genetics) An organism bearing certain genetic material.
  8. A paid male companion offering conversation and in some cases sex, as in certain types of bar in Japan.

Hyponyms

  • (computing): localhost

Synonyms

  • presenter (UK)

Derived terms

Related terms
Translations

Verb

host (third-person singular simple present hosts, present participle hosting, simple past and past participle hosted)

  1. To perform the role of a host.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To lodge at an inn.
  3. (computing, Internet) To run software made available to a remote user or process.
    • 1987 May 7, Selden E. Ball, Jr., Re: Ethernet Terminal Concentrators, comp.protocols.tcp-ip, Usenet
      CMU/TEK TCP/IP software uses an excessive amount of cpu resources for terminal support both outbound, when accessing another system, and inbound, when the local system is hosting a session.
Translations

See also

  • compere
  • guest
  • event
  • master of ceremonies

Etymology 2

From Middle English oost, borrowed from Old French ost, oste, hoste, from Latin hostis (foreign enemy) (as opposed to inimicus (personal enemy)); cognate with etymology 1 through an Indo-European root.

Noun

host (plural hosts)

  1. A multitude of people arrayed as an army; used also in religious senses, as: Heavenly host (of angels)
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 3, ch. X, Plugson of Undershot
      Why, Plugson, even thy own host is all in mutiny: Cotton is conquered; but the ‘bare backs’ — are worse covered than ever!
    • 1955, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Return of the King, book 2, chapter 4, The Field of Cormallen
      All about the hosts of Mordor raged.
    • 2001, Carlos Parada, Hesione 2, Greek Mythology Link
      the invading host that had sailed from Hellas in more than one thousand ships was of an unprecedented size.
  2. A large number of items; a large inventory.
    The dealer stocks a host of parts for my Model A.
    • 1802, William Wordsworth, I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud
      I wandered lonely as a cloud
      That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
      When all at once I saw a crowd,
      A host, of golden daffodils; []
    • 1836, The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction
      A short time since, some friends drinking tea one summer evening at their residence near Maidenhead, with all the windows of the drawing-room open, there suddenly burst in a host of small flies, which covered the table and the furniture []
Derived terms
  • heavenly host
  • Lord of Hosts
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English host, oist, ost, from Old French hoiste, from Latin hostia (sacrificial victim). Doublet of hostie.

Noun

host (plural hosts)

  1. (Christianity) The consecrated bread of the Eucharist.
Translations

See also

  • hostage

Anagrams

  • HOTs, Soth, TOSH, Thos., Tosh, hots, oths, shot, tosh

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan òst, from Latin hostem, singular accusative of hostis, from Proto-Italic *hostis, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóstis (guest, stranger).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈɔst/

Noun

host f (plural hosts)

  1. army, troops

See also

  • exèrcit

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gostь.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦost]

Noun

host m

  1. guest
    Host do domu, Bůh do domu. (“A guest into the house, God into the house”) — old proverb, meaning: respect should be shown to guests
    Host a ryba třetí den smrdí. – The guest and the fish smell the third day.

Declension

Related terms

  • hostit
  • hostitel
  • hostina
  • hostinec
  • nehostinný
  • pohostinství

Further reading

  • host in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • host in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Etymology 1

From English host.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦoːst/.
  • Rhymes: -ɔst

Noun

host m (plural hosts, diminutive hostje n)

  1. (computing) host
Derived terms
  • hosten

Etymology 2

From hossen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦɔst/

Verb

host

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of hossen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of hossen

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

Related to hoste (“to cough”).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hust/
  • Rhymes: -ust

Noun

host n (definite singular hostet, indefinite plural host, definite plural hosta or hostene)

  1. a single cough expulsion

Usage notes

  • Prior to a 2020 spelling revision, this noun was also considered masculine.

Etymology 2

From English host.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɔust/
  • Rhymes: -ɔust

Noun

host m (definite singular hosten, indefinite plural hoster, definite plural hostene)

  1. (computing) host
Synonyms
  • vertsmaskin

Etymology 3

Verb

host

  1. imperative of hoste

References

  • “host” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Related to hosta, hoste (“to cough”).

Noun

host n (definite singular hostet, indefinite plural host, definite plural hosta)

  1. a single cough expulsion

Etymology 2

From English host.

Noun

host m (definite singular hosten, indefinite plural hostar, definite plural hostane)

  1. (computing) host
Synonyms
  • vertsmaskin

Etymology 3

Verb

host

  1. imperative of hosta and hoste

References

  • “host” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English host.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈhowst͡ʃ/

Noun

host m (plural hosts)

  1. (networking) host (computer attached to a network)

Slovene

Noun

hóst

  1. genitive dual/plural of họ̑sta

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English host. Doublet of huésped.

Noun

host m or f (plural hosts)

  1. (computing, Internet) host (any computer attached to a network)
    Synonym: anfitrión


English

Etymology

Attested (in Middle English, as legioun) around 1200, from Old French legion, from Latin legiō, legionem, from legō (to gather, collect); akin to legend, lecture.

Generalized sense of “a large number” is due to allusive phrase in Mark 5:9.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈliːdʒən/
  • Rhymes: -iːdʒən

Adjective

legion (not comparable)

  1. Numerous; vast; very great in number
    Synonyms: multitudinous, numerous

Translations

Noun

legion (plural legions)

  1. (military, Ancient Rome) The major unit or division of the Roman army, usually comprising 3000 to 6000 infantry soldiers and 100 to 200 cavalry troops.
    Meronyms: cohort, maniple, century
  2. (military, obsolete) A combined arms major military unit featuring cavalry, infantry, and artillery.
    Coordinate terms: combat team, regimental combat team, brigade combat team
  3. (military) A large military or semi-military unit trained for combat; any military force; an army, regiment; an armed, organized and assembled militia.
  4. (often Legion or the Legion) A national organization or association of former servicemen, such as the American Legion.
  5. A large number of people; a multitude.
    Synonyms: host, mass, multitude, sea, throng
  6. (often plural) A great number.
  7. (dated, taxonomy) A group of orders inferior to a class; in scientific classification, a term occasionally used to express an assemblage of objects intermediate between an order and a class.

Coordinate terms

  • (military unit): fireteam, section, troop, squad, platoon, company, battalion, regiment, brigade, division, corps, wing, army, army group

Related terms

  • legionary
  • legionnaire

Derived terms

  • superlegion
  • sublegion
  • infralegion

Translations

Verb

legion (third-person singular simple present legions, present participle legioning, simple past and past participle legioned)

  1. (transitive) To form into legions.

Quotations

Further reading

  • Roman legion on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • legion (taxonomy) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • legion (demons) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • legion in popular culture on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

Anagrams

  • eloign, longie, ogle-in

Danish

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun

legion c (singular definite legionen, plural indefinite legioner)

  1. legion

Declension


Esperanto

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /leˈɡion/
  • Hyphenation: le‧gi‧on
  • Rhymes: -ion

Noun

legion

  1. accusative singular of legio

Middle French

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /leˈʒjõː/

Noun

legion f (plural legions)

  1. (military) legion

Descendants

  • French: légion

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun

legion m (definite singular legionen, indefinite plural legioner, definite plural legionene)

  1. legion

Further reading

  • “legion” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • igloen, -logien

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun

legion m (definite singular legionen, indefinite plural legionar, definite plural legionane)

  1. legion

Further reading

  • “legion” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛ.ɡʲjɔn/

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

legion m inan

  1. legion

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun

legion c

  1. legion

Declension

Anagrams

  • logien

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