hostel vs lodge what difference

what is difference between hostel and lodge

English

Etymology

From Middle English hostel, from Old French hostel, ostel, from Late Latin hospitale (hospice), from Classical Latin hospitalis (hospitable) itself from hospes (host) + -alis (-al). Doublet of hotel and hospital. Obsolete from the 16th to 18th centuries, until it was revived by Walter Scott.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈhɑstəl/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhɒstəl/
  • Homophone: hostile (one pronunciation)
  • Rhymes: -ɒstəl

Noun

hostel (plural hostels)

  1. A commercial overnight lodging place, with dormitory accommodation and shared facilities, especially a youth hostel
  2. (not US) A temporary refuge for the homeless providing a bed and sometimes food
  3. (obsolete) A small, unendowed college in Oxford or Cambridge.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:lodging place

Derived terms

  • bail hostel
  • hosteler, hosteller
  • hostelry
  • probation hostel
  • youth hostel

Related terms

  • host
  • hostler
  • hotel

Descendants

  • Japanese: ホステル (hosuteru)
  • Korean: 호스텔 (hoseutel)
  • Oromo: hosteela

Translations

See also

  • hospice

Verb

hostel (third-person singular simple present hostels, present participle hosteling or hostelling, simple past and past participle hosteled or hostelled)

  1. (intransitive) To stay in a hostel during one’s travels.
  2. (transitive) To lodge (a person) in a hostel.

Anagrams

  • Holste, Holtes, Lhotse, Tholes, helots, hotels, hôtels, loseth, shotel, tholes

Czech

Noun

hostel m

  1. hostel

Declension

Related terms

  • host m

Middle English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old French hostel, ostel, from Latin hospitālis, hospitāle. Doublet of hospital.

Alternative forms

  • osteyl, hostele, ostel, hostell, hostelle, ostell, hostil

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /(h)ɔsˈtɛːl/, /(h)ɔsˈtɛi̯l/, /ˈ(h)ɔstəl/

Noun

hostel (plural hosteles)

  1. A hostel or guesthouse; accomodation.
  2. Fun or diversion; entertaining activities.
  3. A dwelling, dormitory or home; housing, lodging.
  4. A house or place of residence; the household.
  5. A owner or manager of a hostel.
Related terms
  • hostellen
  • hostelrye
  • hostiler
Descendants
  • English: hostel
  • Scots: hostel
References
  • “hostē̆l, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-08-07.

Etymology 2

From Old French osteler, hosteler.

Verb

hostel

  1. Alternative form of hostellen

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French ostel

Noun

hostel m (plural hostels)

  1. shelter; living quarters; place to stay
  2. hotel; hostel; inn (establishment offering rooms for hire)

Derived terms

  • maistre d’hostel

Descendants

  • French: hôtel (see there for further descendants)

Old French

Noun

hostel m (oblique plural hosteaus or hosteax or hostiaus or hostiax or hostels, nominative singular hosteaus or hosteax or hostiaus or hostiax or hostels, nominative plural hostel)

  1. Alternative form of ostel

Polish

Etymology

From English hostel, from Middle English hostel, from Old French hostel, ostel, from Late Latin hospitale (hospice), from Classical Latin hospitalis (hospitable) itself from hospes (host) + -alis (-al). Doublet of hotel (hotel) and szpital (hospital).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxɔs.tɛl/

Noun

hostel m inan (diminutive hostelik)

  1. hostel (a commercial overnight lodging place)
  2. hostel (a temporary refuge)
    Synonym: schronisko

Declension

Derived terms

  • (adjective) hostelowy

Further reading

  • hostel in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • hostel in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish

Noun

hostel m (plural hosteles)

  1. hostel


English

Etymology

From Middle English logge, from Old French loge (arbour, covered walk-way) (compare cognate Medieval Latin lobia, laubia), from Frankish *laubijā (shelter; arbour), from Proto-West Germanic *laub (leaf; folliage) (whence English leaf). Cognate with Old High German louba (porch, gallery) (German Laube (bower, arbor)), Old High German loub (leaf, foliage), Old English lēaf (leaf, foliage). Doublet of loggia and lobby.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /lɑdʒ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /lɒdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒdʒ

Noun

lodge (plural lodges)

  1. A building for recreational use such as a hunting lodge or a summer cabin.
  2. Short for porter’s lodge: a building or room near the entrance of an estate or building, especially (Britain, Canada) as a college mailroom.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 54:
      …he walked across Hawthorn Tree Court on his way to the porter’s lodge… At the lodge he cleared his pigeon-hole.
  3. A local chapter of some fraternities, such as freemasons.
  4. (US) A local chapter of a trade union.
  5. A rural hotel or resort, an inn.
  6. A beaver’s shelter constructed on a pond or lake.
  7. A den or cave.
  8. The chamber of an abbot, prior, or head of a college.
  9. (mining) The space at the mouth of a level next to the shaft, widened to permit wagons to pass, or ore to be deposited for hoisting; called also platt.
  10. A collection of objects lodged together.
    • the Maldives, a famous lodge of islands
  11. An indigenous American home, such as tipi or wigwam. By extension, the people who live in one such home; a household.
    1. (historical) A family of Native Americans, or the persons who usually occupy an Indian lodge; as a unit of enumeration, reckoned from four to six persons.

Derived terms

  • Deer Lodge
  • healing lodge
  • hunting lodge
  • Medicine Lodge
  • porter’s lodge
  • Red Lodge
  • sweat lodge
  • ski lodge
  • juggler lodge

Descendants

  • Dutch: lodge

Translations

Verb

lodge (third-person singular simple present lodges, present participle lodging, simple past and past participle lodged)

  1. (intransitive) To be firmly fixed in a specified position.
    I’ve got some spinach lodged between my teeth.
    The bullet missed its target and lodged in the bark of a tree.
  2. (intransitive) To stay in a boarding-house, paying rent to the resident landlord or landlady.
    The detective Sherlock Holmes lodged in Baker Street.
  3. (intransitive) To stay in any place or shelter.
  4. (transitive) To drive (an animal) to covert.
    • 1819, John Mayer, The Sportsman’s Directory, or Park and Gamekeeper’s Companion
      This is the time that the horseman are flung out, not having the cry to lead them to the death. When quadruped animals of the venery or hunting kind are at rest, the stag is said to be harboured, the buck lodged, the fox kennelled, the badger earthed, the otter vented or watched, the hare formed, and the rabbit set. When you find and rouse up the stag and buck, they are said to be imprimed: []
  5. (transitive) To supply with a room or place to sleep in for a time.
  6. (transitive) To put money, jewellery, or other valuables for safety.
  7. (transitive) To place (a statement, etc.) with the proper authorities (such as courts, etc.).
  8. (intransitive) To become flattened, as grass or grain, when overgrown or beaten down by the wind.
    The heavy rain caused the wheat to lodge.
  9. (transitive) To cause to flatten, as grass or grain.

Synonyms

  • (to stay in any place or shelter): stay over, stop; See also Thesaurus:sojourn

Translations

Derived terms

  • ecolodge
  • lodger
  • lodging
  • lodgement

References

Anagrams

  • Le God, e-gold, glode, golde, ogled

French

Noun

lodge m (plural lodges)

  1. lodge (tourist residence, especially in Africa)

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