hot vs live what difference

what is difference between hot and live

English

Alternative forms

  • (physically attractive): hawt (slang, especially Internet), hott (slang, especially Internet)

Etymology

From Middle English hot, hat, from Old English hāt (hot, fervent, fervid, fierce), from Proto-Germanic *haitaz (hot), from Proto-Indo-European *kay- (hot; to heat). Cognate with Scots hate, hait (hot), North Frisian hiet (hot), Saterland Frisian heet (hot), West Frisian hjit (hot), Dutch heet (hot), Low German het (hot), German Low German heet (hot), German heiß (hot), Danish hed (hot), Swedish het (hot), Icelandic heitur (hot).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hŏt, IPA(key): /hɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • (General American) enPR: hät, IPA(key): /hɑt/

Adjective

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hottest)

  1. (of an object) Having a high temperature.
    • There was also hairdressing: hairdressing, too, really was hairdressing in those times — no running a comb through it and that was that. It was curled, frizzed, waved, put in curlers overnight, waved with hot tongs; [].
  2. (of the weather) Causing the air to be hot.
  3. (of a person or animal) Feeling the sensation of heat, especially to the point of discomfort.
  4. (of a temper) Easily provoked to anger.
  5. Feverish.
  6. (of food) Spicy, pungent, piquant, as some chilis and other spices are.
  7. (informal) Very good, remarkable, exciting. [from the 19thc.]
  8. Stolen. [from the 20thc.]
  9. (not comparable) Electrically charged.
  10. (informal) Radioactive. [from the 20thc.]
  11. (slang, of a person) Very physically and/or sexually attractive.
  12. (slang) Sexual or sexy; involving sexual intercourse or sexual excitement.
  13. (slang) Sexually aroused; randy.
  14. (slang, with for) Attracted to.
  15. Popular; in demand.
  16. Of great current interest; provoking current debate or controversy.
    a hot topic
  17. Very close to finding or guessing something to be found or guessed.
  18. Performing strongly; having repeated successes.
    • 1938, Harold M. Sherman, “Shooting Stars,” Boys’ Life (March 1938), Published by Boy Scouts of America, p.5:
      “Keep going! You’re hot tonight!” urged Wally.
    • 2002, Peter Krause & Andy King, Play-By-Play Golf, First Avenue Editions, p.55:
      The ball lands on the fairway, just a couple of yards in front of the green. “Nice shot Sarah! You’re hot today!” Jenny says.
  19. Fresh; just released.
    • 1960, Super Markets of the Sixties: Findings, recommendations.- v.2. The plans and sketches, Super Market Institute, p.30:
      A kid can stand in the street and sell newspapers, if the headlines are hot.
    • 2000, David Cressy, Travesties and transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England: tales of discord and dissension, Oxford University Press, p.34:
      Some of these publications show signs of hasty production, indicating that they were written while the news was hot.
  20. Uncomfortable, difficult to deal with; awkward, dangerous, unpleasant.
  21. (slang) Used to emphasize the short duration or small quantity of something
  22. (slang) Characterized by police presence or activity.
  23. (slang, of a draft/check) Not covered by funds on account.
  24. (of ammunition) This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:hot.

Synonyms

  • (having a high temperature): heated; see also Thesaurus:hot
  • (of the weather): baking, boiling, boiling hot, sultry, sweltering
  • (feeling the sensation of heat): baking, boiling, boiling hot
  • (feverish): feverish, having a temperature
  • (spicy): piquant, spicy, tangy
  • (slang: stolen): stolen
  • (electrically charged): live
  • (radioactive): radioactive
  • (slang: physically or sexually attractive): attractive, beautiful, cute, fit, foxy, gorgeous, handsome, hunky, lush, pretty, sexy, studly, tasty, yummy
  • (of a draft/check): rubber, bad

Antonyms

  • (having a high temperature): chilled, chilly, cold, cold as ice, freezing, freezing cold, frigid, glacial, ice-cold, icy
  • (of the weather): cold, freezing, freezing cold, icy
  • (feeling the sensation of heat): freezing, freezing cold
  • (spicy): bland, mild
  • (electrically charged): neutral, dead
  • (slang): lifeless

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

hot (third-person singular simple present hots, present participle hotting, simple past and past participle hotted)

  1. (with up) To heat; to make or become hot.
  2. (with up) To become lively or exciting.
    • 2018 “Clean Slate”, Wentworth
      Turf war’s hotting up.

Synonyms

  • hot up; heat, heat up

Anagrams

  • -oth, OTH, o’th’, oth, tho, tho’, thô

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦɔt/
  • Hyphenation: hot
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Etymology 1

Unknown.

Adjective

hot (comparative hoter, superlative hotst)

  1. (nautical) right, on the right side
    Synonym: rechts
Derived terms
  • van hot naar her
See also
  • stuurboord

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English hot.

Adjective

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hotst)

  1. (informal) hot, popular
  2. (informal) hot, sexy, attractive
Inflection

Ingrian

Etymology

Borrowed from Russian хоть (xotʹ).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhot/

Conjunction

hot

  1. though

Particle

hot

  1. Used to make a pronoun, adverb or determiner indefinite

References

  • Vitalij Chernyavskij (2005) Ižoran keel (Ittseopastaja)[2]

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • hoth, whote
  • hate, hatte (northern)

Etymology

From Old English hāt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɔːt/, /hɔt/

Adjective

hot

  1. hot

Noun

hot (uncountable)

  1. hotness

Descendants

  • English: hot
  • Scots: hat, hait, hate
  • Yola: hoat, hote

References

  • “hō̆t, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  • “hō̆t, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Pennsylvania German

Verb

hot

  1. third-person singular present indicative of hawwe

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxot/, [ˈxot̪]

Adjective

hot (plural hot or hots)

  1. hot; sexy

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish hōt n, from Old Norse hót n pl, from Proto-Germanic *hwōtō (threat), cognate with Gothic ???????????????? f (ƕōta). Related to *hwētaną (to attack, stab).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huːt/

Noun

hot n

  1. a threat

Declension

Related terms

  • bombhot
  • hota
  • hotbild
  • hotbrev
  • hotfull
  • hotande
  • mordhot
  • terrorhot

Westrobothnian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huːt/, [hɯ́ᵝːt]
    Rhymes: -úːt

Etymology 1

Compare Icelandic hót, contraction of Old Norse hvat.

Noun

hot m

  1. A whit, a bit.
    n litn hot

    a little bit, a little piece

Etymology 2

Ablaut of Icelandic hvata (to sting, jab,) dialectal Norwegian hvæta (to jab,) and related to gwätt, wäti.

Noun

hot n (nominative & accusative definite singular hote)

  1. A sting, pang.
    ja hav söm e hot ått brösten

    I feel a sting in my chest.


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English liven, libben, from Old English lifian, libban (to live; be alive), from Proto-Germanic *libjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *leyp- (leave, cling, linger). Cognate with Saterland Frisian líeuwje (to live), West Frisian libje (to live), Dutch leven (to live), German Low German leven, lęven (to live), German leben (to live), Swedish leva (to live), Icelandic lifa (to live), Gothic ???????????????????? (liban, to live).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: lĭv, IPA(key): /lɪv/
  • Rhymes: -ɪv
  • Hyphenation: live

Verb

live (third-person singular simple present lives, present participle living, simple past and past participle lived)

  1. (intransitive) To be alive; to have life.
  2. (intransitive) To have permanent residence somewhere, to inhabit, to reside.
    1. (intransitive, informal) (of an object) to have its proper place; to normally be stored.
  3. (intransitive) To survive; to persevere; to continue.
  4. (intransitive, hyperbolic) To cope.
  5. (intransitive) To pass life in a specified manner.
  6. (transitive) To spend, as one’s life; to pass; to maintain; to continue in, constantly or habitually.
  7. (transitive) To act habitually in conformity with; to practice; to exemplify in one’s way of life.
    • to live the Gospel
  8. (intransitive) To outlast danger; to float (said of a ship, boat, etc).
  9. (intransitive, followed by “on” or “upon”) To maintain or support one’s existence; to provide for oneself; to feed; to subsist.
  10. (intransitive, informal) To make the most of life; to experience a full, rich life.
Synonyms
  • (to have permanent residence somewhere): dwell; See also Thesaurus:reside
  • (to survive): go on, last, remain; See also Thesaurus:persist
Usage notes

Throughout Late Middle English and Early Modern English in Midlands and Northern dialects, the present participle form livand co-occurs with the form living.

Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See also

  • abide
  • dwell
  • reside
  • stay

Etymology 2

See alive

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: līv; IPA(key): /laɪv/
  • Rhymes: -aɪv

Adjective

live (not comparable)

  1. (only used attributively) Having life; that is alive.
    The post office will not ship live animals.
  2. Being in existence; actual
    He is a live example of the consequences of excessive drinking.
  3. Having active properties; being energized.
    Because the vaccinia virus is live, it is important to follow care instructions for the vaccination site.
  4. Operational; in actual use rather than in testing etc.
    1. (programming) Of an object or value: that may potentially be used in the future execution of a program.
      • Antonym: dead
  5. Taken from a living animal.
    live feathers
  6. (engineering) Imparting power; having motion.
    the live spindle of a lathe
    a live, or driving, axle
  7. (sports) Still in active play.
    a live ball
  8. (card games) Of a card: not yet dealt or played.
    • 2005, Alison M. Pendergast, Play Winning Poker in No Time (page 57)
      As a beginner, when you are in a hand, you should practice counting your outs, or those live cards left in the deck that can improve your hand.
  9. (broadcasting) Being broadcast (“on the air”), as it happens.
    The station presented a live news program every evening.
    Are we live?
  10. (of a performance or speech) In person.
    This nightclub has a live band on weekends.
  11. (entertainment, performing) Recorded from a performance in front of an audience.
    a live album
  12. Of firearms or explosives, capable of causing harm.
    The air force practices dropping live bombs on the uninhabited island.
  13. (circuitry) Electrically charged or energized, usually indicating that the item may cause electrocution if touched.
    Use caution when working near live wires.
  14. (poker) Being a bet which can be raised by the bettor, usually in reference to a blind or straddle.
    Tommy’s blind was live, so he was given the option to raise.
  15. Featuring humans; not animated, in the phrases “live actors” or “live action”.
  16. Being in a state of ignition; burning.
    a live coal; live embers
  17. (obsolete, slang, of a person) Full of earnestness; active; wide awake; glowing.
    a live man, or orator
  18. (obsolete) Vivid; bright.
    • the live carnation
Usage notes
  • Live in the sense of “having life” is used only attributively (before a noun), as in “live animals”. Predicatively (after the noun), alive is used, as in “be alive”. Living may be used either attributively or predicatively.
Synonyms
  • (having life): living, alive; see also Thesaurus:alive
  • (being in existence): real
  • (electrically charged): hot
  • (in person): in person, in the flesh
Antonyms
  • (having life): dead
  • (capable of causing harm): blank, dummy
  • (electrically charged): neutral, dead
  • (as it happens): recorded, prerecorded
  • (in person): broadcast
  • (featuring humans): animated
Derived terms
Compounds
  • live actors
  • live action
  • live album
  • live box
  • live broadcast
  • live recording
Translations

Adverb

live (comparative more live, superlative most live)

  1. Of an event, as it happens; in real time; direct.
    The concert was broadcast live by radio.
  2. Of making a performance or speech, in person.
    He’ll be appearing live at the auditorium.
Translations

Further reading

  • live in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • live in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Levi, Viel, evil, veil, vile, vlei

Danish

Etymology 1

Verbal form of the noun liv (life).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /liːvə/, [ˈliːʊ̯ə], [ˈliːʊ]

Verb

live (imperative liv, infinitive at live, present tense liver, past tense livede, perfect tense har livet)

  1. enliven
Usage notes

Used with op (up): live op

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English live [1965].

Adverb

live

  1. live (as it happens)
Synonyms
  • direkte

Esperanto

Etymology

From liva +‎ -e.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlive/
  • Hyphenation: li‧ve
  • Rhymes: -ive

Adverb

live (lative liven)

  1. (neologism) on the left

Synonyms

  • maldekstre

Antonyms

  • dekstre

Related terms

  • liven

Finnish

Etymology 1


lipeä +‎ -e

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈliʋeˣ/, [ˈliʋe̞(ʔ)]
  • Rhymes: -iʋe
  • Syllabification: li‧ve

Noun

live

  1. (dialectal) lye
Declension
Synonyms
  • lipeä

Etymology 2


From English live.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈliʋe/, [ˈliʋe̞]
  • Rhymes: -iʋe
  • Syllabification: li‧ve

Adjective

live (not comparable)

  1. (nonstandard) live
Usage notes
  • Chiefly used as modifier in compound terms:
    live-esitys

    live performance
  • Almost always used in essive singular when used independently:
    He esiintyvät tänään livenä areenalla.

    They will perform live today at the arena.

Synonyms

  • elävä

Anagrams

  • Elvi, Veli, ilve, veli

French

Pronunciation

Adjective

live

  1. recorded at a concert as opposed to in a studio
  2. in real time

Synonyms

  • en direct

Noun

live m (plural live)

  1. live stream, a video broadcast in real time, a Q&A (even written) in real time
    comment faire un live sur YouTube – how to do a livestream on YouTube
    Le Monde a fait un live pendant le confinement.Le Monde did a live Q&A during the lockdown.

Derived terms

  • album live

German

Etymology

From English live.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /laɪ̯f/

Adverb

live

  1. (broadcast, event) live (at it happens, in real time, directly)

Usage notes

  • There is no adjective corresponding to live, but it can form compounds (see below).

Synonyms

  • direkt
  • in Echtzeit

Derived terms

  • Livekonzert, Live-Konzert
  • Liveschaltung, Live-Schaltung
  • Livesendung, Live-Sendung
  • Liveübertragung, Live-Übertragung

Further reading

  • “live” in Duden online

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlajv/

Adjective

live (invariable)

  1. performed or recorded live

References

Anagrams

  • Levi, levi, veli, vile

Latin

Verb

līvē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of līveō

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²liːʋə/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

live n

  1. dative singular of liv
Usage notes
  • Used only in the fixed expressions i live and til live.

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English live.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑɪ̯ʋ/ (example of pronunciation)

Adjective

live (singular and plural live)

  1. live (some technical senses)
    1. (broadcasting) on air
    2. (of a performance or speech) in person
    3. (entertainment, performing) recorded in front of a live audience

Etymology 3

From Old Norse hlífa, from Proto-Germanic *hlībijaną. The noun is derived from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²liːʋə/ (example of pronunciation)

Verb

live (present tense liver, past tense livde, past participle livd/livt, passive infinitive livast, present participle livande, imperative liv)

  1. (transitive) to shelter, protect, especially from the weather and elements
Alternative forms
  • liva (a-infinitive)
Related terms
  • livd f

Noun

live n (definite singular livet, uncountable)

  1. (rare) shelter, cover, protection, especially from the elements
    Synonyms: le, livd, ly

Etymology 4

Of the noun liv n (life).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²liːʋə/ (example of pronunciation)

Verb

live (present tense livar, past tense liva, past participle liva, passive infinitive livast, present participle livande, imperative liv)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to liven
Alternative forms
  • liva (a-infinitive)
Derived terms
  • live opp

References

  • “live” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • elvi, evli, leiv, Levi, veil

Picard

Etymology

From Latin liber.

Noun

live m (plural lives)

  1. book

Swazi

Noun

líve 5 (plural émáve 6)

  1. country

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


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