hot vs spicy what difference

what is difference between hot and spicy

English

Alternative forms

  • (physically attractive): hawt (slang, especially Internet), hott (slang, especially Internet)

Etymology

From Middle English hot, hat, from Old English hāt (hot, fervent, fervid, fierce), from Proto-Germanic *haitaz (hot), from Proto-Indo-European *kay- (hot; to heat). Cognate with Scots hate, hait (hot), North Frisian hiet (hot), Saterland Frisian heet (hot), West Frisian hjit (hot), Dutch heet (hot), Low German het (hot), German Low German heet (hot), German heiß (hot), Danish hed (hot), Swedish het (hot), Icelandic heitur (hot).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hŏt, IPA(key): /hɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • (General American) enPR: hät, IPA(key): /hɑt/

Adjective

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hottest)

  1. (of an object) Having a high temperature.
    • There was also hairdressing: hairdressing, too, really was hairdressing in those times — no running a comb through it and that was that. It was curled, frizzed, waved, put in curlers overnight, waved with hot tongs; [].
  2. (of the weather) Causing the air to be hot.
  3. (of a person or animal) Feeling the sensation of heat, especially to the point of discomfort.
  4. (of a temper) Easily provoked to anger.
  5. Feverish.
  6. (of food) Spicy, pungent, piquant, as some chilis and other spices are.
  7. (informal) Very good, remarkable, exciting. [from the 19thc.]
  8. Stolen. [from the 20thc.]
  9. (not comparable) Electrically charged.
  10. (informal) Radioactive. [from the 20thc.]
  11. (slang, of a person) Very physically and/or sexually attractive.
  12. (slang) Sexual or sexy; involving sexual intercourse or sexual excitement.
  13. (slang) Sexually aroused; randy.
  14. (slang, with for) Attracted to.
  15. Popular; in demand.
  16. Of great current interest; provoking current debate or controversy.
    a hot topic
  17. Very close to finding or guessing something to be found or guessed.
  18. Performing strongly; having repeated successes.
    • 1938, Harold M. Sherman, “Shooting Stars,” Boys’ Life (March 1938), Published by Boy Scouts of America, p.5:
      “Keep going! You’re hot tonight!” urged Wally.
    • 2002, Peter Krause & Andy King, Play-By-Play Golf, First Avenue Editions, p.55:
      The ball lands on the fairway, just a couple of yards in front of the green. “Nice shot Sarah! You’re hot today!” Jenny says.
  19. Fresh; just released.
    • 1960, Super Markets of the Sixties: Findings, recommendations.- v.2. The plans and sketches, Super Market Institute, p.30:
      A kid can stand in the street and sell newspapers, if the headlines are hot.
    • 2000, David Cressy, Travesties and transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England: tales of discord and dissension, Oxford University Press, p.34:
      Some of these publications show signs of hasty production, indicating that they were written while the news was hot.
  20. Uncomfortable, difficult to deal with; awkward, dangerous, unpleasant.
  21. (slang) Used to emphasize the short duration or small quantity of something
  22. (slang) Characterized by police presence or activity.
  23. (slang, of a draft/check) Not covered by funds on account.
  24. (of ammunition) This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:hot.

Synonyms

  • (having a high temperature): heated; see also Thesaurus:hot
  • (of the weather): baking, boiling, boiling hot, sultry, sweltering
  • (feeling the sensation of heat): baking, boiling, boiling hot
  • (feverish): feverish, having a temperature
  • (spicy): piquant, spicy, tangy
  • (slang: stolen): stolen
  • (electrically charged): live
  • (radioactive): radioactive
  • (slang: physically or sexually attractive): attractive, beautiful, cute, fit, foxy, gorgeous, handsome, hunky, lush, pretty, sexy, studly, tasty, yummy
  • (of a draft/check): rubber, bad

Antonyms

  • (having a high temperature): chilled, chilly, cold, cold as ice, freezing, freezing cold, frigid, glacial, ice-cold, icy
  • (of the weather): cold, freezing, freezing cold, icy
  • (feeling the sensation of heat): freezing, freezing cold
  • (spicy): bland, mild
  • (electrically charged): neutral, dead
  • (slang): lifeless

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

hot (third-person singular simple present hots, present participle hotting, simple past and past participle hotted)

  1. (with up) To heat; to make or become hot.
  2. (with up) To become lively or exciting.
    • 2018 “Clean Slate”, Wentworth
      Turf war’s hotting up.

Synonyms

  • hot up; heat, heat up

Anagrams

  • -oth, OTH, o’th’, oth, tho, tho’, thô

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦɔt/
  • Hyphenation: hot
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Etymology 1

Unknown.

Adjective

hot (comparative hoter, superlative hotst)

  1. (nautical) right, on the right side
    Synonym: rechts
Derived terms
  • van hot naar her
See also
  • stuurboord

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English hot.

Adjective

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hotst)

  1. (informal) hot, popular
  2. (informal) hot, sexy, attractive
Inflection

Ingrian

Etymology

Borrowed from Russian хоть (xotʹ).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhot/

Conjunction

hot

  1. though

Particle

hot

  1. Used to make a pronoun, adverb or determiner indefinite

References

  • Vitalij Chernyavskij (2005) Ižoran keel (Ittseopastaja)[2]

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • hoth, whote
  • hate, hatte (northern)

Etymology

From Old English hāt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɔːt/, /hɔt/

Adjective

hot

  1. hot

Noun

hot (uncountable)

  1. hotness

Descendants

  • English: hot
  • Scots: hat, hait, hate
  • Yola: hoat, hote

References

  • “hō̆t, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  • “hō̆t, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Pennsylvania German

Verb

hot

  1. third-person singular present indicative of hawwe

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxot/, [ˈxot̪]

Adjective

hot (plural hot or hots)

  1. hot; sexy

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish hōt n, from Old Norse hót n pl, from Proto-Germanic *hwōtō (threat), cognate with Gothic ???????????????? f (ƕōta). Related to *hwētaną (to attack, stab).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huːt/

Noun

hot n

  1. a threat

Declension

Related terms

  • bombhot
  • hota
  • hotbild
  • hotbrev
  • hotfull
  • hotande
  • mordhot
  • terrorhot

Westrobothnian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huːt/, [hɯ́ᵝːt]
    Rhymes: -úːt

Etymology 1

Compare Icelandic hót, contraction of Old Norse hvat.

Noun

hot m

  1. A whit, a bit.
    n litn hot

    a little bit, a little piece

Etymology 2

Ablaut of Icelandic hvata (to sting, jab,) dialectal Norwegian hvæta (to jab,) and related to gwätt, wäti.

Noun

hot n (nominative & accusative definite singular hote)

  1. A sting, pang.
    ja hav söm e hot ått brösten

    I feel a sting in my chest.


English

Alternative forms

  • spicey

Etymology

From spice +‎ -y, attested since the 16th century.

Adjective

spicy (comparative spicier, superlative spiciest)

  1. Of, pertaining to, or containing spice.
    He prepared a spicy casserole.
  2. (of flavors) Provoking a burning sensation due to the presence of chilis or similar hot spices
    This curry is too spicy for me. I can’t eat it.
  3. (of flavors or odors) Tangy, zesty, or pungent.
    She breathed in the strong, spicy aroma.
  4. (of expression or behavior) Vigorous; colorful; stimulating.
    He is known for his spicy political commentary.
  5. Risqué, sexy, racy; mildly pornographic.
    I don’t want my children to see the spicy images on this web site.

Synonyms

  • (provoking a burning sensation): hot, spicy-hot, piquant

Translations

References

  • Webster, Noah (1828), “spicy”, in An American Dictionary of the English Language
  • “spicy” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • “spicy” in Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary (Cambridge University Press, 2007)
  • “spicy”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • Oxford English Dictionary, second edition (1989)
  • Random House Webster’s Unabridged Electronic Dictionary (1987-1996)

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspʲit͡sɨ/

Adjective

spicy

  1. sleeping, asleep
  2. dormant (e.g. of a volcano)

Declension

Participle

spicy

  1. past active participle of spaś

Declension

Synonyms

  • spijucy

References

  • Arnošt Muka (1921, 1928), “spicy”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German, Russian), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted (in German)Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • spicy in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

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