hot vs swell what difference

what is difference between hot and swell

English

Alternative forms

  • (physically attractive): hawt (slang, especially Internet), hott (slang, especially Internet)

Etymology

From Middle English hot, hat, from Old English hāt (hot, fervent, fervid, fierce), from Proto-Germanic *haitaz (hot), from Proto-Indo-European *kay- (hot; to heat). Cognate with Scots hate, hait (hot), North Frisian hiet (hot), Saterland Frisian heet (hot), West Frisian hjit (hot), Dutch heet (hot), Low German het (hot), German Low German heet (hot), German heiß (hot), Danish hed (hot), Swedish het (hot), Icelandic heitur (hot).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hŏt, IPA(key): /hɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • (General American) enPR: hät, IPA(key): /hɑt/

Adjective

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hottest)

  1. (of an object) Having a high temperature.
    • There was also hairdressing: hairdressing, too, really was hairdressing in those times — no running a comb through it and that was that. It was curled, frizzed, waved, put in curlers overnight, waved with hot tongs; [].
  2. (of the weather) Causing the air to be hot.
  3. (of a person or animal) Feeling the sensation of heat, especially to the point of discomfort.
  4. (of a temper) Easily provoked to anger.
  5. Feverish.
  6. (of food) Spicy, pungent, piquant, as some chilis and other spices are.
  7. (informal) Very good, remarkable, exciting. [from the 19thc.]
  8. Stolen. [from the 20thc.]
  9. (not comparable) Electrically charged.
  10. (informal) Radioactive. [from the 20thc.]
  11. (slang, of a person) Very physically and/or sexually attractive.
  12. (slang) Sexual or sexy; involving sexual intercourse or sexual excitement.
  13. (slang) Sexually aroused; randy.
  14. (slang, with for) Attracted to.
  15. Popular; in demand.
  16. Of great current interest; provoking current debate or controversy.
    a hot topic
  17. Very close to finding or guessing something to be found or guessed.
  18. Performing strongly; having repeated successes.
    • 1938, Harold M. Sherman, “Shooting Stars,” Boys’ Life (March 1938), Published by Boy Scouts of America, p.5:
      “Keep going! You’re hot tonight!” urged Wally.
    • 2002, Peter Krause & Andy King, Play-By-Play Golf, First Avenue Editions, p.55:
      The ball lands on the fairway, just a couple of yards in front of the green. “Nice shot Sarah! You’re hot today!” Jenny says.
  19. Fresh; just released.
    • 1960, Super Markets of the Sixties: Findings, recommendations.- v.2. The plans and sketches, Super Market Institute, p.30:
      A kid can stand in the street and sell newspapers, if the headlines are hot.
    • 2000, David Cressy, Travesties and transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England: tales of discord and dissension, Oxford University Press, p.34:
      Some of these publications show signs of hasty production, indicating that they were written while the news was hot.
  20. Uncomfortable, difficult to deal with; awkward, dangerous, unpleasant.
  21. (slang) Used to emphasize the short duration or small quantity of something
  22. (slang) Characterized by police presence or activity.
  23. (slang, of a draft/check) Not covered by funds on account.
  24. (of ammunition) This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:hot.

Synonyms

  • (having a high temperature): heated; see also Thesaurus:hot
  • (of the weather): baking, boiling, boiling hot, sultry, sweltering
  • (feeling the sensation of heat): baking, boiling, boiling hot
  • (feverish): feverish, having a temperature
  • (spicy): piquant, spicy, tangy
  • (slang: stolen): stolen
  • (electrically charged): live
  • (radioactive): radioactive
  • (slang: physically or sexually attractive): attractive, beautiful, cute, fit, foxy, gorgeous, handsome, hunky, lush, pretty, sexy, studly, tasty, yummy
  • (of a draft/check): rubber, bad

Antonyms

  • (having a high temperature): chilled, chilly, cold, cold as ice, freezing, freezing cold, frigid, glacial, ice-cold, icy
  • (of the weather): cold, freezing, freezing cold, icy
  • (feeling the sensation of heat): freezing, freezing cold
  • (spicy): bland, mild
  • (electrically charged): neutral, dead
  • (slang): lifeless

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

hot (third-person singular simple present hots, present participle hotting, simple past and past participle hotted)

  1. (with up) To heat; to make or become hot.
  2. (with up) To become lively or exciting.
    • 2018 “Clean Slate”, Wentworth
      Turf war’s hotting up.

Synonyms

  • hot up; heat, heat up

Anagrams

  • -oth, OTH, o’th’, oth, tho, tho’, thô

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦɔt/
  • Hyphenation: hot
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Etymology 1

Unknown.

Adjective

hot (comparative hoter, superlative hotst)

  1. (nautical) right, on the right side
    Synonym: rechts
Derived terms
  • van hot naar her
See also
  • stuurboord

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English hot.

Adjective

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hotst)

  1. (informal) hot, popular
  2. (informal) hot, sexy, attractive
Inflection

Ingrian

Etymology

Borrowed from Russian хоть (xotʹ).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhot/

Conjunction

hot

  1. though

Particle

hot

  1. Used to make a pronoun, adverb or determiner indefinite

References

  • Vitalij Chernyavskij (2005) Ižoran keel (Ittseopastaja)[2]

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • hoth, whote
  • hate, hatte (northern)

Etymology

From Old English hāt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɔːt/, /hɔt/

Adjective

hot

  1. hot

Noun

hot (uncountable)

  1. hotness

Descendants

  • English: hot
  • Scots: hat, hait, hate
  • Yola: hoat, hote

References

  • “hō̆t, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  • “hō̆t, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Pennsylvania German

Verb

hot

  1. third-person singular present indicative of hawwe

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxot/, [ˈxot̪]

Adjective

hot (plural hot or hots)

  1. hot; sexy

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish hōt n, from Old Norse hót n pl, from Proto-Germanic *hwōtō (threat), cognate with Gothic ???????????????? f (ƕōta). Related to *hwētaną (to attack, stab).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huːt/

Noun

hot n

  1. a threat

Declension

Related terms

  • bombhot
  • hota
  • hotbild
  • hotbrev
  • hotfull
  • hotande
  • mordhot
  • terrorhot

Westrobothnian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huːt/, [hɯ́ᵝːt]
    Rhymes: -úːt

Etymology 1

Compare Icelandic hót, contraction of Old Norse hvat.

Noun

hot m

  1. A whit, a bit.
    n litn hot

    a little bit, a little piece

Etymology 2

Ablaut of Icelandic hvata (to sting, jab,) dialectal Norwegian hvæta (to jab,) and related to gwätt, wäti.

Noun

hot n (nominative & accusative definite singular hote)

  1. A sting, pang.
    ja hav söm e hot ått brösten

    I feel a sting in my chest.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: swĕl, IPA(key): /swɛl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Etymology 1

From Middle English swellen, from Old English swellan (to swell), from Proto-Germanic *swellaną (to swell), of unknown origin. Cognate with Old Frisian swella, Low German swellen, Dutch zwellen (to swell), German schwellen (to swell), Swedish svälla (to swell), Icelandic svella. The adjective may derive from the noun.

Verb

swell (third-person singular simple present swells, present participle swelling, simple past swelled or swole or swoll, past participle swollen or swelled)

  1. (intransitive) To become bigger, especially due to being engorged.
    • c. 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Prologue,[1]
      O for a Muse of fire, that would ascend
      The brightest heaven of invention,
      A kingdom for a stage, princes to act
      And monarchs to behold the swelling scene!
    • 1914, P. C. Wren, Snake and Sword, London: Longmans, Green, Chapter 5, p. 78,[2]
      “If you drinks a drop more, Miss Lucy, you’ll just go like my pore young sister goed, [] Pop she did not. She swole … swole and swole.”
      “You mean ‘swelled,’ Cookoo,” corrected Lucille []
      [] I say she swole—and what is more she swole clean into a dropsy.”
  2. (transitive) To cause to become bigger.
    • 1633, John Donne, “The Storme” in Poems, London: John Marriot, p. 57,[3]
      Mildly it [the wind] kist our sailes, and, fresh, and sweet,
      As, to a stomack sterv’d, whose insides meete,
      Meate comes, it came; and swole our sailes, when wee
      So joyd, as Sara’ her swelling joy’d to see.
    • 1687, Francis Atterbury, An Answer to Some Considerations on the Spirit of Martin Luther and the Original of the Reformation, Oxford, p. 12,[4]
      ’Tis low ebb sure with his Accuser, when such Peccadillos as these are put in to swell the Charge.
    • 2013 June 18, Simon Romero, “Protests Widen as Brazilians Chide Leaders,” New York Times (retrieved 21 June 2013):
      After a harsh police crackdown last week fueled anger and swelled protests, President Dilma Rousseff, a former guerrilla who was imprisoned under the dictatorship and has now become the target of pointed criticism herself, tried to appease dissenters by embracing their cause on Tuesday.
  3. (intransitive) To grow gradually in force or loudness.
  4. (transitive) To cause to grow gradually in force or loudness.
    • 1880, Felix Leopold Oswald, Summerland Sketches (page 57)
      It commenced with a slow crescendo, so irresistibly lugubrious that two of our dogs at once raised their heads and swelled their voices into a responsive tremolo, which may have been heard and appreciated by their distant relatives.
  5. (transitive) To raise to arrogance; to puff up; to inflate.
  6. (intransitive) To be raised to arrogance.
    • c. 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act 5, Scene 1,[6]
      Why, here he comes, swelling like a turkey-cock.
    • 1814, Walter Scott, Waverley, Edinburgh: James Ballantyne, Volume 3, Chapter 9, p. 111,[7]
      [] you swell at the sight of tartan, as the bull is said to do at scarlet.
  7. To be elated; to rise arrogantly.
    • 1662, John Dryden, To My Lord Chancellor Presented on New-Years-Day, London: Henry Herringman, p. 5,[8]
      In all things else above our humble fate
      Your equal mind yet swells not into state,
      But like some mountain in those happy Isles
      Where in perpetual Spring young Nature smiles,
      Your greatnesse shows:
  8. To be turgid, bombastic, or extravagant.
  9. To protuberate; to bulge out.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English swelle, from the verb swellen (modern swell).

Noun

swell (countable and uncountable, plural swells)

  1. The act of swelling; increase in size.
  2. A bulge or protuberance.
  3. Increase of power in style, or of rhetorical force.
    • 1826, Walter Savage Landor, Imaginary Conversations, London: Henry Colburn, 2nd edition, Volume I, Conversation 6, p. 128,[9]
      Concentrated are his arguments, select and distinct and orderly his topics, ready and unfastidious his expressions, popular his allusions, plain his illustrations, easy the swell and subsidence of his periods []
  4. A long series of ocean waves, generally produced by wind, and lasting after the wind has ceased.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island, ch. 24:
      There was a great, smooth swell upon the sea.
  5. (music) A gradual crescendo followed by diminuendo.
  6. (music) A device for controlling the volume of a pipe organ.
  7. (music) A division in a pipe organ, usually the largest enclosed division.
  8. A hillock or similar raised area of terrain.
    • 1909, Joseph A. Altsheler, The Last of the Chiefs, ch. 2:
      Off on the crest of a swell a moving figure was seen now and then. “Antelope,” said the hunters.
  9. (geology) An upward protrusion of strata from whose central region the beds dip quaquaversally at a low angle.
  10. (informal, dated) A person is stylish, fancy, or elegant.
    • c. 1850, William Makepeace Thackeray, “The Kickleburys on the Rhine” in The Christmas Books of Mr. M. A. Titmarsh:
      It costs him no more to wear all his ornaments about his distinguished person than to leave them at home. If you can be a swell at a cheap rate, why not?
    • 1887, Horatio Alger, The Cash Boy, ch. 9:
      He was dressed in a flashy style, not unlike what is popularly denominated a swell.
  11. (informal) A person of high social standing; an important person.
    • 1864, Anthony Trollope, The Small House at Allington, ch. 2:
      “I am not in Mr Crosbie’s confidence. He is in the General Committee Office, I know; and, I believe, has pretty nearly the management of the whole of it.”
      “I’ll tell you what he is, Bell; Mr Crosbie is a swell.” And Lilian Dale was right; Mr Crosbie was a swell.
    • 1900, Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim, Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood Chapter 14, p. 176,[10]
      The only sensible man I came across was the cabman who drove me about. A broken-down swell he was, I fancy.
    • 1906, Gilbert Parker, The Trespasser, ch. 8:
      You buy a lot of Indian or halfbreed loafers with beaver-skins and rum, go to the Mount of the Burning Arrows, and these fellows dance round you and call you one of the lost race, the Mighty Men of the Kimash Hills. And they’ll do that while the rum lasts. Meanwhile you get to think yourself a devil of a swell—you and the gods!
    • 1938, Graham Greene, Brighton Rock, New York: Vintage, 2002, Part Seven, Chapter 3, p. 209,[11]
      [] Colleoni’s going to take over this place from you, and he’s got his lawyer. A man in London. A swell.’
  12. The front brow of a saddle bow, connected in the tree by the two saddle bars to the cantle on the other end.
    Synonyms: pommel, fork
Synonyms
  • (person dressed in a fancy or elegant manner): dandy, dude, toff
  • (person of high social standing): toff
Derived terms
  • ground swell, groundswell
  • upswell
  • wind swell
Translations

Etymology 3

From the noun “swell” (a person dressed in an elegant manner).

Adjective

swell (not generally comparable, comparative sweller, superlative swellest)

  1. (dated) Fashionable, like a swell or dandy.
    • 1912, Popular Mechanics (page 20)
      We pay the express, $5 a day our new agents are making and wearing the swellest clothes besides; old agents after one season make twice as much.
  2. (Canada, US, informal, dated) Excellent.
    • 1931, Dashiell Hammett, The Glass Key, New York: Vintage, 1972, Chapter 9, p. 176,[12]
      Jeff swaggered over to Ned Beaumont, threw his left arm roughly around his shoulders, seized Ned Beaumont’s right hand with his right hand, and addressed the company jovially: “This is the swellest guy I ever skinned a knuckle on and I’ve skinned them on plenty.”
    • 1958, Robert A. Heinlein, Have Space Suit—Will Travel, New York: Ballantine Books, 1977, Chapter 1, p. 8,[13]
      [] we’re league champions in basketball and our square-dance team is state runner-up and we have a swell sock hop every Wednesday.
    • 2012, Ariel Levy, “The Space In Between”, The New Yorker, 10 Sep 2012:
      Orgasms are swell, but they are not the remedy to every injustice.
Translations

Adverb

swell (not comparable)

  1. (Canada, US, informal) Very well.
    • 1929, Dashiell Hammett, Red Harvest, Chapter 12,[14]
      “That lousy ring wasn’t worth no grand. I did swell to get two centuries for it.”
    • 1966, Truman Capote, In Cold Blood, New York: Modern Library, 2013, Part 3, p. 251,[15]
      [] Last August, when I left The Walls, I figured I had every chance to start new. I got a job in Olathe, lived with my family, and stayed home nights. I was doing swell—”

Translations

Anagrams

  • Wells, wells

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English swellan.

Verb

swell

  1. Alternative form of swellen

Etymology 2

From the verb swellen.

Adverb

swell

  1. Alternative form of swelle

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English swell.

Noun

swell m (plural swells)

  1. (surfing) swell (series of waves)

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial