hound vs hunt what difference

what is difference between hound and hunt

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English hound, from Old English hund, from Proto-West Germanic *hund, from Proto-Germanic *hundaz. Cognate with West Frisian hûn, Dutch hond, Luxembourgish Hond, German Hund, German Low German Hund, Danish hund, Faroese hundur, Icelandic hundur, Norwegian Bokmål hund, Norwegian Nynorsk hund, and Swedish hund), from pre-Germanic *ḱuntós (compare Latvian sùnt-ene (big dog), enlargement of Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ (dog) (compare Welsh cwn (dogs), Tocharian B ku, Lithuanian šuõ, Armenian շուն (šun), Russian сука (suka). Doublet of canine.

Noun

hound (plural hounds)

  1. A dog, particularly a breed with a good sense of smell developed for hunting other animals.
  2. Any canine animal.
  3. (by extension) Someone who seeks something.
    • 1996, Marc Parent, Turning Stones, Harcourt Brace & Company, →ISBN, page 93,
      On the way out of the building I was asked for my autograph. If I’d known who the signature hound thought I was, I would’ve signed appropriately.
    • 2004, Jodi Picoult, My Sister’s Keeper, Simon & Schuster, →ISBN, page 483
      I still do not know if he’s taken on this case because he’s a glory hound, because he wants the PR, or if he simply wanted to help Anna.
  4. (by extension) A male who constantly seeks the company of desirable women.
    • 1915, Norman Duncan, “A Certain Recipient”, in Harper’s, volume 122, number 787, December 1915, republished in Harper’s Monthly Magazine, volume 122, December 1915 to May 1916, page 108,
      “Are you alone, Goodson? [] I thought, perhaps, that the [] young woman, Goodson, who supplanted Mary?” []
      “She had a good many successors, John.”
      “You are such a hound, in that respect, Goodson,” said Claywell, “and you have always been such a hound, that it astounds me to find you—unaccompanied.”
  5. A despicable person.
    • 1973, Elizabeth Walter, Come and Get Me and Other Uncanny Invitations
      ‘You blackmailing hound,’ the parrot said distinctly, in what Hodges recognized as General Derby’s voice. Anstruther turned pale.
  6. A houndfish.
Usage notes
  • In more recent times, hound has been replaced by Modern English dog but the sense remains the same.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English hounden, from the noun (see above).

Verb

hound (third-person singular simple present hounds, present participle hounding, simple past and past participle hounded)

  1. (transitive) To persistently harass.
  2. (transitive) To urge on against; to set (dogs) upon in hunting.
    • 1897, Andrew Lang, The Book of Dreams and Ghosts (page 162)
      We both thought we saw what had the appearance to be a fox, and hounded the dogs at it, but they would not pursue it.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English hownde, hount, houn, probably from Old Norse húnn, from Proto-Germanic *hūnaz.

Noun

hound (plural hounds)

  1. (nautical, in the plural) Projections at the masthead, serving as a support for the trestletrees and top to rest on.
  2. A side bar used to strengthen portions of the running gear of a vehicle.

Anagrams

  • Duhon, Hudon, hundo, no duh

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • honde, hounde, hund, hunde, hond, hownd, hownde, hwond

Etymology

From Old English hund

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huːnd/, /hund/

Noun

hound (plural houndes or hounden)

  1. dog, hound (The canid Canis lupus familiaris)
    1. A pet dog; a dog kept for companionship.
    2. A hunting or sporting dog; a hound.
    3. (specifically) A male or fully-grown dog.
  2. A strong term of abuse, especially used against enemies of one’s religion
  3. (rare) A heraldic portrayal of a dog.
  4. (rare) The forces of evil; the infernal army.
  5. (rare) Sirius (star)

Usage notes

The general word for “dog” is hound; dogge is vaguely derogatory and has a sense of “mongrel” or “cur”.

Derived terms

  • hound fysch
  • hounden
  • houndesberye
  • houndestonge

Descendants

  • English: hound
    • Northumbrian: hoond, hund
  • Scots: hoond, hund

References

  • “hǒund, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-06-11.


English

Etymology

From Middle English hunten, from Old English huntian (to hunt), from Proto-Germanic *huntōną (to hunt, capture), from Proto-Indo-European *kend- (to catch, seize). Related to Old High German hunda (booty), Gothic ???????????????????? (hunþs, body of captives), Old English hūþ (plunder, booty, prey), Old English hentan (to catch, seize). More at hent, hint.
In some areas read as a collective form of hound by folk etymology.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hʌnt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌnt

Verb

hunt (third-person singular simple present hunts, present participle hunting, simple past and past participle hunted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To find or search for an animal in the wild with the intention of killing the animal for its meat or for sport.
    • Esau went to the field to hunt for venison.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, Locksley Hall
      Like a dog, he hunts in dreams.
    • 2010, Backyard deer hunting: converting deer to dinner for pennies per pound →ISBN, page 10:
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To try to find something; search (for).
    The police are hunting for evidence.
  3. (transitive) To drive; to chase; with down, from, away, etc.
    to hunt down a criminal
    He was hunted from the parish.
  4. (transitive) To use or manage (dogs, horses, etc.) in hunting.
    • He hunts a pack of dogs better than any man in the country.
  5. (transitive) To use or traverse in pursuit of game.
    He hunts the woods, or the country.
  6. (bell-ringing, transitive) To move or shift the order of (a bell) in a regular course of changes.
  7. (bell-ringing, intransitive) To shift up and down in order regularly.
  8. (engineering, intransitive) To be in a state of instability of movement or forced oscillation, as a governor which has a large movement of the balls for small change of load, an arc-lamp clutch mechanism which moves rapidly up and down with variations of current, etc.; also, to seesaw, as a pair of alternators working in parallel.

Derived terms

  • headhunt, head-hunt
  • hunt where the ducks are
  • that dog won’t hunt

Translations

Noun

hunt (plural hunts)

  1. The act of hunting.
  2. A hunting expedition.
  3. An organization devoted to hunting, or the people belonging to it.
  4. A pack of hunting dogs.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Thun

Bavarian

Noun

hunt ? 

  1. (Sappada, Sauris, Timau) dog

References

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

Cimbrian

Noun

hunt m

  1. dog

References

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Estonian

Etymology

Most likely from Middle Low German hunt.
Possibly an earlier loan from Proto-Germanic *hundaz.

Noun

hunt (genitive hundi, partitive hunti)

  1. wolf, grey wolf

Declension

Synonyms

  • susi
  • untsantsakas
  • hall hunt

Mòcheno

Etymology

From Middle High German hunt, from Old High German hunt, from Proto-West Germanic *hund, from Proto-Germanic *hundaz (dog). Cognate with German Hund, English hound.

Noun

hunt m

  1. dog

References

  • “hunt” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *hund.

Noun

hunt m

  1. dog

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: hont
    • Dutch: hond

Further reading

  • “hunt (I)”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *hund.

Noun

hunt m

  1. dog

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle High German: hunt
    • Alemannic German: Hund
      Alsatian: Hund
      Swabian: Hond
      Walser: hun, hund, hunn, hònn
    • Bavarian:
      Cimbrian: hunt
      Mòcheno: hunt
      Udinese: hunt
    • Central Franconian: Hond, Honk, Honk
      Hunsrik: Hund
      Kölsch: Hunk, Hungk
    • German: Hund
      • Esperanto: hundo
        • Ido: hundo
    • Luxembourgish: Hond
    • Vilamovian: hund
    • Yiddish: הונט(hunt)

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