house vs sign what difference

what is difference between house and sign

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English hous, hus, from Old English hūs (dwelling, shelter, house), from Proto-Germanic *hūsą (compare Scots hoose, West Frisian hûs, Dutch huis, German Haus, German Low German Huus, Danish hus, Faroese hús, Icelandic hús, Norwegian Bokmål hus, Norwegian Nynorsk hus and Swedish hus), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kews-, from *(s)kewH- (to cover, hide). Compare also Northern Luri هۏش(höš, house, home). Eclipsed non-native Middle English meson, measoun (house), borrowed from Old French maison (house). More at hose.

The uncommon plural form housen is from Middle English husen, housen. (The Old English nominative plural was simply hūs.)

Alternative forms

  • howse (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hous, IPA(key): /haʊs/
  • (Canada, Virginia) IPA(key): /hʌʊs/
  • Rhymes: -aʊs

Noun

house (countable and uncountable, plural houses or (dialectal) housen or (chiefly humorous) hice)

  1. A structure built or serving as an abode of human beings. [from 9th c.]
    • The big houses, and there are a good many of them, lie for the most part in what may be called by courtesy the valleys. You catch a glimpse of them sometimes at a little distance from the [railway] line, which seems to have shown some ingenuity in avoiding them, [].
  2. The people who live in a house; a household. [from 9th c.]
    • one that feared God with all his house
  3. A building used for something other than a residence (typically with qualifying word). [from 10th c.]
    1. A place of business; a company or organisation, especially a printing press, a publishing company, or a couturier. [from 10th c.]
    2. A place of public accommodation or entertainment, especially a public house, an inn, a restaurant, a theatre, or a casino; or the management thereof.[from 10th c.]
    3. (historical) A workhouse.
      • 1834, Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons, Reports from the Commissioners (volume 29, page 169)
        To this the pauper replied that he did not want that, and that rather than be sent to the house he would look out for work.
  4. The audience for a live theatrical or similar performance. [from 10th c.]
  5. A theatre.
    • 1964, Northwest Ohio Quarterly (volume 36, page 185)
      The farce comedy which followed, When We’re Married by Charles Burnham, was heartily praised, with the character man singled out for special extollation. The production filled the house.
  6. (politics) A building where a deliberative assembly meets; whence the assembly itself, particularly a component of a legislature. [from 10th c.]
  7. A dynasty; a family with its ancestors and descendants, especially a royal or noble one. [from 10th c.]
  8. (figuratively) A place of rest or repose. [from 9th c.]
    • 1598, Ben Jonson, Every Man in His Humour
      Like a pestilence, it doth infect / The houses of the brain.
    • 1815, Walter Scott, The Lord of the Isles
      Such hate was his, when his last breath / Renounced the peaceful house of death  [].
  9. A grouping of schoolchildren for the purposes of competition in sports and other activities. [from 19th c.]
  10. An animal’s shelter or den, or the shell of an animal such as a snail, used for protection. [from 10th c.]
  11. (astrology) One of the twelve divisions of an astrological chart. [from 14th c.]
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, p.313:
      Since there was a limited number of planets, houses and signs of the zodiac, the astrologers tended to reduce human potentialities to a set of fixed types and to postulate only a limited number of possible variations.
  12. (cartomancy) The fourth Lenormand card.
  13. (chess, now rare) A square on a chessboard, regarded as the proper place of a piece. [from 16th c.]
  14. (curling) The four concentric circles where points are scored on the ice. [from 19th c.]
  15. Lotto; bingo. [from 20th c.]
  16. (uncountable) A children’s game in which the players pretend to be members of a household.
  17. (US, dialect) A small stand of trees in a swamp.
  18. (sudoku) A set of cells in a Sudoku puzzle which must contain each digit exactly once, such as a row, column, or 3×3 box in classic Sudoku.
Synonyms
  • (establishment): shop
  • (company or organisation): shop
Hypernyms
  • building
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Nigerian Pidgin: haus
  • Tok Pisin: haus
  • Sranan Tongo: oso
    • Dutch: osso
Translations

See house/translations § Noun.

Further reading
  • house on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • house (astrology) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • house (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English housen, from Old English hūsian, from Proto-Germanic *hūsōną (to house, live, dwell), from the noun (see above). Compare Dutch huizen (to live, dwell, reside), German Low German husen (to live, dwell, reside), German hausen (to live, dwell, reside), Norwegian Nynorsk husa (to house), Faroese húsa (to house), Icelandic húsa (to shelter, house).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: houz, IPA(key): /haʊz/
  • Rhymes: -aʊs, -aʊz
  • Homophone: how’s (verb)

Verb

house (third-person singular simple present houses, present participle housing, simple past and past participle housed)

  1. (transitive) To keep within a structure or container.
  2. (transitive) To admit to residence; to harbor.
  3. To take shelter or lodging; to abide; to lodge.
  4. (transitive, astrology) To dwell within one of the twelve astrological houses.
    • Where Saturn houses.
  5. (transitive) To contain or cover mechanical parts.
  6. (transitive) To contain one part of an object for the purpose of locating the whole.
  7. (obsolete) To drive to a shelter.
  8. (obsolete) To deposit and cover, as in the grave.
    • 1636, George Sandys, Paraphrase upon the Psalms and Hymns dispersed throughout the Old and New Testaments
      Oh! can your counsel his despair defer , Who now is housed in his sepulchre
  9. (nautical) To stow in a safe place; to take down and make safe.
  10. (Canada, US, slang, transitive) To eat.
    • 2019, Joe Lawson, Shameless (series 10, episode 4, “A Little Gallagher Goes a Long Way”)
      All you wanna do is drink a fifth, house a lasagna, and hide in a dumpster until that baby stops crying.
Synonyms
  • (keep within a structure or container): store
  • (admit to residence): accommodate, harbor/harbour, host, put up
  • (contain or enclose mechanical parts): enclose
Translations

Etymology 3

Probably from The Warehouse, a nightclub in Chicago, Illinois, USA, where the music became popular around 1985.

Noun

house (uncountable)

  1. (music) House music.
Translations

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦou̯sɛ]

Etymology 1

Noun

house n

  1. gosling

Declension

Etymology 2

Noun

house m anim

  1. house music, house (a genre of music)

Further reading

  • house in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • house in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

house m (uncountable)

  1. house music, house (a genre of music)

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɑu̯s/, [ˈhɑu̯s̠]
  • Syllabification: hou‧se

Noun

house (uncountable)

  1. (music) house music, house (a genre of music)

Declension


French

Pronunciation

  • (aspirated h) IPA(key): /aws/

Noun

house f (uncountable)

  1. house music, house (a genre of music)

Synonyms

  • house music

Anagrams

  • houes, houés

Hungarian

Etymology

From English house.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhɒuz]
  • Hyphenation: house
  • Rhymes: -uz

Noun

house (plural house-ok)

  1. (music) house music, house (a type of electronic dance music with an uptempo beat and recurring kickdrum)

Declension

Derived terms

  • house-parti
  • house-zene

References


Middle English

Noun

house

  1. Alternative form of hous

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English house, house music

Noun

house m (indeclinable) (uncountable)

  1. house music, house (a genre of music)

Synonyms

  • housemusikk

References

  • “house” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

house m

  1. house music, house (a genre of music)

Polish

Etymology

From English house music. Doublet of chyża (barn).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //xaws//

Noun

house m inan

  1. house music, house (a genre of music)
Declension

Derived terms

  • (adjectives) house’owy, housowy

Further reading

  • house in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • house in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From English house music.

Noun

house m

  1. house music, house (a genre of music)
    Synonym: música house

Spanish

Etymology

From English house music.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxaus/, [ˈxau̯s]

Noun

house m (uncountable)

  1. house music, house (a genre of music)

Swedish

Etymology

From English house music.

Noun

house c

  1. house music, house (a genre of music)

Declension

Synonyms

  • housemusik, house-musik


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /saɪn/
  • Homophones: sine, syne
  • Rhymes: -aɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle English signe, sygne, syng, seine, sine, syne, from Old English seġn (sign; mark; token) and Old French signe, seing (sign; mark; signature); both from Latin signum (a mark; sign; token); root uncertain. Doublet of signum. Partially displaced native token.

Noun

sign (countable and uncountable, plural signs)

  1. (sometimes also used uncountably) A perceptible (e.g. visibile) indication.
    • 2000, Geoffrey McGuinness, Carmen McGuinness, How to Increase Your Child’s Verbal Intelligence: The Language Wise Method, Yale University Press (→ISBN), page 38:
      The sound of the Orlando dinner train whistle reminds me that it ‘ s already Friday, an auditory sign. Another auditory sign, a distant thunder clap, warns me of limited computer time before our evening thunderstorm moves in.
  2. (Canada, US, Australia, uncountable) Physical evidence left by an animal.
  3. A clearly visible object, generally flat, bearing a short message in words or pictures.
  4. A wonder; miracle; prodigy.
    • 1611, King James Version, Exodus 4:17:
      And thou shalt take this rod in thine hand, wherewith thou shalt do signs.
  5. (astrology) An astrological sign.
  6. (mathematics) Positive or negative polarity, as denoted by the + or – sign.
  7. A specific gesture or motion used to communicate by those with speaking or hearing difficulties; now specifically, a linguistic unit in sign language equivalent to word in spoken languages.
    • 2007, Marcel Danesi, The Quest for Meaning:
      In American Sign Language (ASL), for instance, the sign for ‘catch’ is formed with one hand (in the role of agent) moving across the body (an action) to grasp the forefinger of the other hand (the patient).
  8. (uncountable) Sign language in general.
  9. A semantic unit, something that conveys meaning or information (e.g. a word of written language); (linguistics, semiotics) a unit consisting of a signifier and a signified concept. (See sign (semiotics).)
    • 1692, Thomas Bennet, Short Introduction of Grammar … of the Latine Tongue:
      A Noun substantive and a Noun adjective may be thus distinguished, that a substantive may have the sign a or the before it; as, puer, a boy, the boy; but an adjective cannot, as, bonus, good.
    • 1753, Charles Davies, Busby’s English Introduction to the Latin Tongue Examined, page 11:
      A Pronoun is a Noun implying a Person, but not admitting the Sign a or the before it.
    • 2008, Eero Tarasti, Robert S. Hatten, A Sounding of Signs: Modalities and Moments in Music, Culture, and Philosophy : Essays in Honor of Eero Tarasti on His 60th Anniversary:
      And some linguistic signs, like “the”, “and” or “with”, may lack apparent objects, though they are clearly meaningful and interpretable.
  10. An omen.
  11. (medicine) A property of the body that indicates a disease and, unlike a symptom, is unlikely to be noticed by the patient.
  12. A military emblem carried on a banner or standard.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English signen, seinen, seinien, partly from Old English seġnian (to mark; sign) and partly from Anglo-Norman seigner, seiner et al., Old French signer et al., and their source Latin signāre (to mark, seal, indicate, signify); all from Latin signum (a mark, sign); see Etymology 1, above. Compare sain.

Verb

sign (third-person singular simple present signs, present participle signing, simple past and past participle signed)

  1. To make a mark
    1. (transitive, now rare) To seal (a document etc.) with an identifying seal or symbol. [from 13th c.]
      The Queen signed her letter with the regal signet.
    2. (transitive) To mark, to put or leave a mark on. [from 14th c.]
      • 1726, Elijah Fenton, The Odyssey of Homer:
        Meantime revolving in his thoughtful mind / The scar, with which his manly knee was sign’d […].
    3. (transitive) To validate or ratify (a document) by writing one’s signature on it. [from 15th c.]
      • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice:
        Enquire the Iewes house out, giue him this deed, / And let him signe it […].
    4. (transitive) More generally, to write one’s signature on (something) as a means of identification etc. [from 15th c.]
      I forgot to sign that letter to my aunt.
    5. (transitive or reflexive) To write (one’s name) as a signature. [from 16th c.]
      Just sign your name at the bottom there.
      I received a letter from some woman who signs herself ‘Mrs Trellis’.
    6. (intransitive) To write one’s signature. [from 17th c.]
      Please sign on the dotted line.
    7. (intransitive) To finalise a contractual agreement to work for a given sports team, record label etc. [from 19th c.]
      • 2011, The Guardian, (headline), 18 Oct 2011:
        Agents say Wales back Gavin Henson has signed for Cardiff Blues.
    8. (transitive) To engage (a sports player, musician etc.) in a contract. [from 19th c.]
      It was a great month. I managed to sign three major players.
  2. To make the sign of the cross
    1. (transitive) To bless (someone or something) with the sign of the cross; to mark with the sign of the cross. [from 14th c.]
      • We receive this child into the congregation of Christ’s flock, and do sign him with the sign of the cross.
      • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, p. 34:
        At the baptismal ceremony the child was […] signed with the cross in holy water.
    2. (reflexive) To cross oneself. [from 15th c.]
      • 1855, Robert Browning, Men and Women:
        Shaking a fist at him with one fierce arm, / Signing himself with the other because of Christ.
  3. To indicate
    1. (intransitive) To communicate using a gesture or signal. [from 16th c.]
    2. (transitive) To communicate or make known (a meaning, intention, etc.) by a sign.
    3. (transitive) To communicate using gestures to (someone). [from 16th c.]
      He signed me that I should follow him through the doorway.
    4. (intransitive) To use sign language. [from 19th c.]
    5. (transitive) To furnish (a road etc.) with signs. [from 20th c.]
  4. To determine the sign of
    1. (transitive) To calculate or derive whether a quantity has a positive or negative sign.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • signal
  • signature
  • signet
  • signify
Translations

Further reading

  • sign in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • sign in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • IGNs, Ings, NGIs, Sing, Sing., gins, ings, nigs, sing, sing., snig

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