hovel vs hutch what difference

what is difference between hovel and hutch

English

Etymology

From Middle English hovel, hovil, hovylle, diminutive of Old English hof (an enclosure, court, dwelling, house), from Proto-Germanic *hufą (hill, farm), from Proto-Indo-European *kewp- (arch, bend, buckle), equivalent to howf +‎ -el. Cognate with Dutch hof (garden, court), German Hof (yard, garden, court, palace), Icelandic hof (temple, hall). Related to hove and hover.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɒvəl/, /ˈhʌvəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɒvəl
  • Rhymes: -ʌvəl

Noun

hovel (plural hovels)

  1. An open shed for sheltering cattle, or protecting produce, etc., from the weather.
  2. A poor cottage; a small, mean house; a hut.
  3. In the manufacture of porcelain, a large, conical brick structure around which the firing kilns are grouped.

Translations

Verb

hovel (third-person singular simple present hovels, present participle hovelling or hoveling, simple past and past participle hovelled or hoveled)

  1. (transitive) To put in a hovel; to shelter.
    • The poor are hovell’d and hustled together.
  2. (transitive) To construct a chimney so as to prevent smoking, by making two of the more exposed walls higher than the others, or making an opening on one side near the top.


English

Etymology

From Middle English hucche (storage chest), variation of whucce, from Old English hwiċe, hwiċċe (box, chest). Spelling influenced by Old French huche (chest), from Medieval Latin hūtica, from a different Germanic root, from Frankish *hutta, from Proto-Germanic *hudjō, *hudjǭ (box, hut, hutch). Akin to Old English hȳdan (to conceal; hide). More at hide, hut.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hʌtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌtʃ

Noun

hutch (plural hutches)

  1. A box, chest, crate, case or cabinet.
  2. A coop or cage for keeping small animals (rabbits, guinea pigs, dogs, etc).
  3. A piece of furniture in which items may be displayed.
  4. A cabinet for storing dishes.
  5. A piece of furniture (cabinet) to be placed on top of a desk.
  6. A measure of two Winchester bushels.
  7. (mining) The case of a flour bolt.
  8. (mining) A car on low wheels, in which coal is drawn in the mine and hoisted out of the pit.
  9. (mining) A jig or trough for ore dressing or washing ore.
  10. A baker’s kneading-trough.

Translations

Verb

hutch (third-person singular simple present hutches, present participle hutching, simple past and past participle hutched)

  1. (transitive) To hoard or lay up, in a chest.
  2. (mining, transitive) To wash (ore) in a box or jig.
  3. (intransitive) This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 1956, William Golding, Pincher Martin
      And the mind was very disinclined to hutch out of the crevice and face what must be done. [] He hauled himself out of the crevice and the air was warm so that he undressed to trousers and sweater. [] He hutched himself back against a rock with his legs sprawled apart.

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