howitzer vs mortar what difference

what is difference between howitzer and mortar

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Dutch houwitser, from German Haubitze, from Czech houfnice, which was derived from houf (flock, crowd) +‎ -nice. The Czech noun houf comes from Middle High German hufe (heap), from Old High German hūfo.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhaʊ.ɪts.ə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈhaʊ.ɪts.əɹ/

Noun

howitzer (plural howitzers)

  1. A cannon that combines certain characteristics of guns and mortars. The howitzer delivers projectiles with medium velocities, by either low or high trajectories.
  2. Normally a cannon with a tube length of 20 to 30 calibers; however, the tube length can exceed 30 calibers and still be considered a howitzer when the high angle fire zoning solution permits range overlap between charges
  3. (sports, rugby, ice hockey) A powerfully hit shot.

Translations

References



English

Etymology

From Middle English morter, from Old French mortier, from Latin mortārium. Doublet of mortarium.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔː(r)tə(r)
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmɔːtə(ɹ)/

Noun

mortar (countable and uncountable, plural mortars)

  1. (uncountable) A mixture of lime or cement, sand and water used for bonding building blocks.
  2. (countable) A muzzle-loading, indirect fire weapon with a tube length of 10 to 20 calibers and designed to lob shells at very steep trajectories.
  3. (countable) A hollow vessel used to pound, crush, rub, grind or mix ingredients with a pestle.
  4. (countable) In paper milling, a trough in which material is hammered.

Derived terms

  • mortarboard

Translations

Verb

mortar (third-person singular simple present mortars, present participle mortaring, simple past and past participle mortared)

  1. (transitive) To use mortar or plaster to join two things together.
  2. (transitive) To pound in a mortar.
  3. To fire a mortar (weapon).
  4. To attack (someone or something) using a mortar (weapon).

Related terms

  • bricks and mortar

See also

  • gun
  • howitzer

Anagrams

  • marrot

Ido

Etymology

Derived from morto +‎ -ar.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɔrˈtar/

Verb

mortar (present mortas, past mortis, future mortos, conditional mortus, imperative mortez)

  1. (intransitive, literally and figuratively) to die, cease to live, depart this life
  2. (intransitive) to go out (of fire, lights, etc.)
  3. (intransitive) to come to an end (of movement)

Conjugation


Indonesian

Etymology

From English mortar, from Middle English morter, from Old French mortier, from Latin mortārium. Doublet of mortir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmɔr.tar]
  • Hyphenation: mor‧tar

Noun

mortar (first-person possessive mortarku, second-person possessive mortarmu, third-person possessive mortarnya)

  1. mortar,
    1. a mixture of lime or cement, sand and water used for bonding building blocks.
    2. a hollow vessel used to pound, crush, rub, grind or mix ingredients with a pestle.
      Synonym: lumpang

Further reading

  • “mortar” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Middle English

Noun

mortar

  1. Alternative form of morter

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

mortar m

  1. indefinite plural of mort

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin mortārium (19th century).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /morˈtar/

Noun

mortar n (uncountable)

  1. mortar (construction material)

Declension

Related terms

  • mortier
  • mojar

Further reading

  • mortar in DEX online – Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

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