howler vs scream what difference

what is difference between howler and scream

English

Etymology

howl +‎ -er. Some senses are derivatives of the intensifier “howling”, as in “howling wilderness”, (Deuteronomy 32:10)

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈhaʊlɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhaʊlə/
  • Rhymes: -aʊlə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: howl‧er

Noun

howler (plural howlers)

  1. That which howls, especially an animal such as a wolf or a howler monkey.
  2. (historical) A person hired to howl at a funeral.
  3. (slang) A painfully obvious mistake.
    • 1993, Paul Krugman, How I Work, October 1 1993, in: Paul Krugman, Arguing with Zombies, 2020, p. 402:
      Given what we know about cognitive psychology, utility maximization is a ludicrous concept; equilibrium pretty foolish outside of financial markets; perfect competition a howler for most industries.
    • 2009, Tom Burton, Quadrant, November 2009, No. 461 (Volume LIII, Number 11), Quadrant Magazine Limited, page 78:
      A howler is a glaring mistake, a mistake that cries out to be noticed.
  4. (slang) A hilarious joke.
  5. (slang) A bitterly cold day.
  6. (psychology) A person who expresses aggression openly in the form of threats.
    Coordinate term: hunter
    • 2008, J. Reid Meloy, Lorraine Sheridan, Jens Hoffmann, Stalking, Threatening, and Attacking Public Figures (page 121)
      Although their behavior does not have the same impact as hunters, howlers nevertheless distract the public figure and compel security and law enforcement []
    • 2015, Steve Albrecht, Library Security: Better Communication, Safer Facilities
      Hunters stalk their targets, make detailed plans, acquire and practice with weapons, and try to hurt or kill people. Howlers make bomb threats to schools, malls, churches, businesses, and government offices.
  7. (sometimes figuratively) A heavy fall.
  8. (slang) A serious accident (especially to come a howler or go a howler; compare come a cropper).
    Our hansom came a howler.
  9. (slang) A tremendous lie; a whopper.
  10. (slang, dated) A fashionably but extravagantly overdressed man, a “howling swell”.
  11. (historical) A 32-ounce ceramic, plastic, or stainless steel jug used to transport draft beer.

Derived terms

  • calamity howler

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Wohler, wholer


English

Etymology

From Middle English scremen, scræmen, probably from a fusion of Middle Dutch scremen (to yell; shout) and Old Norse skræma (to terrify; scare); compare Dutch schremen (to shout; yell; cry), Swedish skrämma (to spook; frighten), Danish skræmme (to scare), West Frisian skrieme (to weep). Compare also Swedish skräna (to yell; shout; howl), Dutch schreien (to cry; weep), German schreien (to scream). Related to shriek, skrike.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /skɹiːm/
  • (General American) enPR: skrīm, IPA(key): /skɹim/
  • Rhymes: -iːm

Noun

scream (plural screams)

  1. A loud, emphatic, exclamation of extreme emotion, especially horror, fear, excitement, or anger; it may comprise a word or a sustained, high-pitched vowel sound.
  2. A loud vocalisation of many animals, especially in response to pain or fear.
  3. (music) A form of singing associated with the metal and screamo styles of music. It is a loud, rough, distorted version of the voice; rather than the normal voice of the singer.
  4. (informal) Used as an intensifier
  5. (printers’ slang) exclamation mark

Translations

Verb

scream (third-person singular simple present screams, present participle screaming, simple past and past participle screamed or (nonstandard) screamt)

  1. (intransitive, also figuratively) To cry out with a shrill voice; to utter a sudden, shout outcry, or shrill, loud cry, as in fright or extreme pain; to screech, to shriek.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:shout
  2. (intransitive, figuratively)
    1. To move quickly; to race.
      Synonyms: speed, zoom; see also Thesaurus:move quickly, Thesaurus:rush
    2. (informal) To be very indicative of; clearly having the characteristics of.

Conjugation

Translations

Anagrams

  • McRaes, crames, creams, cremas, macers, recams

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