huge vs immense what difference

what is difference between huge and immense

English

Etymology

From Middle English huge, from Old French ahuge (high, lofty, great, large, huge), from a hoge (at height), from a (at, to) + hoge (a hill, height), from Frankish *haug, *houg (height, hill) or Old Norse haugr (hill); both from Proto-Germanic *haugaz (hill, mound), from Proto-Indo-European *kowkós (hill, mound), from the root Proto-Indo-European *kewk-. Akin to Old High German houg (mound) (compare related German Hügel (hill)), Old Norse haugr (mound), Lithuanian kaũkaras (hill), Old High German hōh (high) (whence German hoch), Old English hēah (high). More at high.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /hjuːd͡ʒ/, [çu̟ːd͡ʒ]
  • (US)
  • (NYC, some other US dialects) IPA(key): /juːdʒ/
  • (Norfolk) IPA(key): [hʊudʒ]

Adjective

huge (comparative huger, superlative hugest)

  1. Very large.
    • “I don’t mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, [] the chlorotic squatters on huge yachts, [] the neurotic victims of mental cirrhosis, the jewelled animals whose moral code is the code of the barnyard—!”
  2. (slang) Distinctly interesting, significant, important, likeable, well regarded.

Synonyms

  • (very large): colossal, elephantine, enormous, giant, gigantic, immense, prodigious, vast.
  • See also Thesaurus:gigantic

Antonyms

  • (very large): tiny, small, minuscule, midget, dwarf

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • huge in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • huge in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • e-hug, eugh, gehu

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • hoige, houge, hugge, hoge, hogge, hoege, heug, heuge, hogh

Etymology

From Old French ahuge, a form of ahoge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhiu̯dʒ(ə)/

Adjective

huge

  1. huge, large, enormous
  2. great, severe, excessive, prominent
  3. numerous, plentiful

Descendants

  • English: huge
  • Scots: huge, hudge

References

  • “hūǧe, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-03.

Adverb

huge

  1. hugely, greatly

References

  • “hūǧe, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-03.

Middle French

Noun

huge f (plural huges)

  1. market stall


English

Etymology

From Middle French immense, from Latin immensus, from in- (not) + mensus (measured). Compare incommensurable.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈmɛns/
  • Rhymes: -ɛns

Adjective

immense (comparative immenser, superlative immensest)

  1. Huge, gigantic, very large.
  2. (colloquial) Supremely good.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:gigantic

Related terms

  • immensely
  • immensity

Translations

Noun

immense (plural immenses)

  1. (poetic) immense extent or expanse; immensity
    • 1882, James Thomson (B. V.), “Despotism Tempered by Dynamite”:
      The half of Asia is my prison-house,
      Myriads of convicts lost in its Immense
      I look with terror to my crowning day.

Anagrams

  • Eminems

Dutch

Pronunciation

Adjective

immense

  1. Inflected form of immens

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin immēnsus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /i(m).mɑ̃s/

Adjective

immense (plural immenses)

  1. immense, huge

Related terms

  • immensément
  • immensifier
  • immensité

Further reading

  • “immense” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Adjective

immense f pl

  1. feminine plural of immenso

Latin

Adjective

immēnse

  1. vocative masculine singular of immēnsus

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