hulk vs whale what difference

what is difference between hulk and whale

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /hʌlk/
  • Rhymes: -ʌlk

Etymology 1

The noun is derived from Middle English hulk (hut; shed for hogs; type of ship; husk, pod, shell; large, clumsy person; a giant) [and other forms] (probably reinforced by
Middle Dutch hulk [and other forms] and Middle Low German hulk [and other forms]), from Old English hulc (light ship; heavy, clumsy ship; cabin, hovel, hut); further etymology uncertain, but probably related to Ancient Greek ὁλκάς (holkás, ship being towed; cargo ship; ship used for trading) (compare
Ancient Greek ἕλκω (hélkō, to drag), of Mediterranean origin, or from Proto-Indo-European *selk- (to draw, pull)).

The verb is derived from the noun.

Noun

hulk (plural hulks)

  1. (nautical)
    1. (archaic) A large ship used for transportation; (more generally) a large ship that is difficult to manoeuvre.
    2. (by extension) A non-functional but floating ship, usually stripped of equipment and rigging, and often put to other uses such as accommodation or storage.
  2. (figuratively) A large structure with a dominating presence.
  3. (figuratively) A big (and possibly clumsy) person.
    1. (bodybuilding) An excessively muscled person.
Alternative forms
  • hulke (obsolete)
Derived terms
  • hulkish
  • hulky
  • sheer hulk
Translations

Verb

hulk (third-person singular simple present hulks, present participle hulking, simple past and past participle hulked)

  1. (transitive, nautical)
    1. To reduce (a ship) to a non-functional hulk.
      • 2003, Gordon de L. Marshall, Ships’ Figure Heads in Australia, Tangee Publishing (→ISBN), page 52:
        In Fremantle very few vessels appear to have been reduced to hulks, and only one figure head Samuel Plimsoll, [Fig. 62] survives from a sailing ship hulked in 1904. […] The Sarah Burnyeat was hulked in Albany in 1886, […]
      • 2017, Rif Winfield, Stephen S Roberts, French Warships in the Age of Sail 1626–1786, Seaforth Publsihing (→ISBN), page 203:
        No further additions were made to this group, and by 1729 the Rank was extinct (the last to be struck was the Ludlow, which had been hulked in 1719).
    2. To temporarily house (goods, people, etc.) in such a hulk.
  2. (transitive) To move (a large, hulking body).
    • 1968, Francis Russell, The Shadow of Blooming Grove – Warren G. Harding in His Times (→ISBN):
      This hearty, willing man had hulked his 354 pounds about the world, faithfully and deftly running presidential errands in Cuba, Panama, the Philippines, Rome, Russia, and Japan and China.
    • 1994, Alison Hawthorne Deming, Science and Other Poems, LSU Press (→ISBN), page 16:
      A man with four children crowding like saplings around him whistles to wake up the elephant seal who has hulked his impossible body onto the beach.
    • 2017, N.D.Rabin, Hidden Magic: Fear of the Smallest Wizard, AuthorHouse (→ISBN)
      Hadrian hulked his mass over the spot where the children had disappeared. ‘You are still here, aren’t you? I can feel your presence.’ He walked forwards and his giant strides came down on the children. They scrambled out the way, […]
  3. (intransitive) To be a hulk, that is, a large, hulking, and often imposing presence.
    • 1992, Richard Condon, The Venerable Bead, Macmillan (→ISBN), page 163:
      After one trip with them, he decided he couldn’t stand to have bodyguards hulking around him wherever he went. He felt like an idiot walking along the aisles of the supermarket with eight lumpy men standing around […]
    • 2006, Angus Dunn, Writing in the Sand, Luath Press Ltd (→ISBN):
      As the occupants stepped out, he hulked at them menacingly and asked them the traditional question. ‘Can Ah help youse?’
    • 2007, Cheryl Strayed, Torch, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (→ISBN), page 156:
      An oven hulked in the middle of the room, detached from everything, and a gathering of objects sat in the corner: a rolled rug with gnarled tassels, a chair from the bar downstairs that was missing a leg, a box […]
    • 2008, J. D. Robb, Three in Death, Penguin (→ISBN):
      The remains of an old bar hulked in the center of the room. As it was draped with more dusty protective cloth, she assumed Hopkins had intended to restore it to whatever its former glory might have been.
    • 2012, Paul Melko, The Broken Universe, Tor Books (→ISBN), page 314:
      The whoosh pushed John down, and as he fell, he turned to see the machine hulking over him, just meters away. “Shit!” he cried […]
  4. (intransitive) Of a (large) person: to act or move slowly and clumsily.
    • 1934, Gösta Larsson, Our Daily Bread: A Novel:
      After a while he hulked up to where Erland sat, putting his hairy fist on the table and watching the boy work.
    • 2008, Craig Conte, Millennial Reign, iUniverse (→ISBN), page 301:
      Instead he hulked his way towards Kruger again as the crowd ooohd and aaahd at the prowess. The two men were about equal in height, but Matusak outweighed Kruger by about fifty pounds.
Derived terms
  • hulking (adjective, noun)
  • hulkingly
  • hulk out
Translations

Etymology 2

A variant of holk (to dig out, hollow out, make hollow; to dig up, excavate; to dig into, investigate), from Middle English holken (to dig out, hollow out; to dig up, excavate) (compare holk (a hollow; body cavity)), from Proto-Germanic *hulaz (hollow, adjective); further etymology uncertain, perhaps either from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover), or *ḱewh₁- (to swell; to be strong).

Verb

hulk (third-person singular simple present hulks, present participle hulking, simple past and past participle hulked)

  1. (transitive, obsolete except Britain, dialectal) To remove the entrails of; to disembowel.

References

Further reading

  • hulk (medieval ship type) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • hulk (ship type) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • hulk (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Kuhl, kuhl

Lower Sorbian

Noun

hulk m

  1. Obsolete spelling of wulk

Declension


Middle Low German

Noun

hulk m

  1. Alternative form of holk

References

  • “holk” in Köbler, Gerhard, Mittelniederdeutsches Wörterbuch (3rd edition 2014)


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wāl, IPA(key): /weɪl/
  • (without the winewhine merger) enPR: hwāl, IPA(key): /ʍeɪl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophones: wail, wale (in accents with the wine-whine merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English whale, from Old English hwæl (whale), from Proto-West Germanic *hwal, from Proto-Germanic *hwalaz (whale) (compare German Wal, Swedish val, Danish and Norwegian Bokmål hval, Norwegian Nynorsk kval; compare also Dutch walvis, West Frisian walfisk, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kʷálos (sheatfish) (compare German Wels, Latin squalus (big sea fish), Old Prussian kalis, Ancient Greek ἄσπαλος (áspalos), Avestan ????????????????(kara, kind of fish)).

Noun

whale (plural whales)

  1. Any one of numerous large marine mammals comprising an informal group within infraorder Cetacea that usually excludes dolphins and porpoises.
    Synonym: (obsolete) baleen
  2. (by extension) Any species of Cetacea.
  3. (figuratively) Something, or someone, that is very large.
    • 1920 September, “A Reformed Free Lance” (pseudonym), “Doctoring a Sick Encyclopedia”, in The Writer, Volume XXXII, Number 9, page 131:
      It was a whale of a job. [] It took two months, and the fair blush of youth off my cheeks.
    • 1947 May 19, John Chamberlain, “Will Clayton and his Problem”, in Life, page 120:
      But when it comes to his business life and business career, Will Clayton is not as other men; he is such a whale of a lot better that it suggests a qualitative as well as a quantitative difference.
  4. (figuratively, as “whale of a ___”) Something, or someone, that is excellent.
    • 2002, Kathleen Benson, Philip M. Kayal, Museum of the City of New York, A Community of Many Worlds: Arab Americans in New York City, Syracuse University Press →ISBN, page 54
      My own father only wrote one poem in his life as far as I know, but it was a whale of a lyric, the kind you would give your whole life to write, which he did, but that is another story.
    • 2006, June Skinner Sawyers, Read the Beatles: Classic and New Writings on the Beatles, Their Legacy, and Why They Still Matter, Penguin →ISBN
      Busley Crowther in The New York Times called it “a whale of a comedy” even though he couldn’t tell the four musicians apart except for Ringo (“the big-nosed one”).
    • 2013, Fred Holtby & Chris Lovie, ROWDY – THE STORY OF A POLICE DOG, Lulu.com →ISBN, page 105
      They were having a whale of a time when a very stern looking shop assistant came over to tell them off.
  5. (gambling) In a casino, a person who routinely bets at the maximum limit allowable.
  6. (finance, informal) An investor who deals with very large amounts of money.
  7. (video games, by extension) A video game player who spends large amounts of money on optional content.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • narwhal
  • rorqual
  • walrus
Translations
See also

Verb

whale (third-person singular simple present whales, present participle whaling, simple past and past participle whaled)

  1. (intransitive) To hunt for whales.
Translations

References

  • whale on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Cetacea on Wikispecies.Wikispecies
  • Cetacea on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Etymology 2

Uncertain. Perhaps a variant of wale influenced by whack, whap, etc.

Verb

whale (third-person singular simple present whales, present participle whaling, simple past and past participle whaled)

  1. (slang, transitive) To thrash, to flog, to beat vigorously or soundly.
    • 1852, Thomas Chandler Haliburton, Why Mr Sellum disposed of the horse (chapter XIV in Works, volume 22):
      Brought him back, put him in the stall—low stable—got out of his reach, and then begun to whale him. Then he kicked up agin; []
    • 1865 May, Three Days at Camp Douglass, in Our Young Folks: An Illustrated Magazine for Boys and Girls, volume I, number V, page 296:
      “I wouldn’t let him. When you were a boy in your part of the country, and other boys told tales about you, what did you do with them?” “Whaled ’em like time, Captin’,” answered the man; “and if ye’ll only shet yer eyes to ‘t, I’ll whale him.” “I can’t allow such things in the prison,” said the Captain; “and besides, the fellow will be lame for a fortnight, and wouldn’t be a match for you in that condition. Let him get limber, and then, if you don’t whale him, I’ll make you walk the ladder for a month.” The result was, the conscript officer received a sound thrashing; and did not commit another act worthy of punishment for a week.
    • 2004, Steve Frazee, Voices in the Hill (→ISBN):
      They beat him down and kept whaling him after he was flat.
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:whale.
Derived terms
  • whale on
Translations

Anagrams

  • wheal

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • hwæl, qual, whal, swale, quall, quale, whaale, whalle, qwayll, wale, qwall, qwalle

Etymology

Inherited from Old English hwæl, from Proto-West Germanic *hwal, from Proto-Germanic *hwalaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʍaːl/, /ʍal/
  • (dialectal) IPA(key): /waːl/, /xʍaːl/

Noun

whale (plural whales)

  1. A whale or cetacean.
  2. (rare) An oceanic monster.
  3. (rare) The meat of the whale.

Descendants

  • English: whale
  • Scots: whaul

References

  • “whāle, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-01.

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