humble vs menial what difference

what is difference between humble and menial

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈhʌmbəl/
  • (obsolete, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈʌmbəl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌmbəl
  • Hyphenation: hum‧ble

Etymology 1

From Middle English humble, from Old French humble, umble, humle, from Latin humilis (low, slight, hence mean, humble) (compare Greek χαμαλός (khamalós, on the ground, low, trifling)), from humus (the earth, ground), humi (on the ground). See homage, and compare chameleon, humiliate. Displaced native Old English ēaþmōd.

The verb is from Middle English humblen (to humble).

Adjective

humble (comparative humbler or more humble, superlative humblest or most humble)

  1. Not pretentious or magnificent; unpretending; unassuming.
    • 17th century, Abraham Cowley, The Shortness of Life and Uncertainty of Riches
      The wise example of the heavenly lark.
      Thy fellow poet, Cowley, mark,
      Above the clouds let thy proud music sound,
      Thy humble nest build on the ground.
  2. Having a low opinion of oneself; not proud, arrogant, or assuming; modest.
    Synonyms: unassuming, modest
  3. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) Near the ground.
    • 1952, E. B. White, Charlotte’s Web, Harper Brothers:
      “Humble?” said Charlotte. “‘Humble’ has two meanings. It means ‘not proud’ and it means ‘near the ground.’ That’s Wilbur all over. He’s not proud and he’s near the ground.
Synonyms
  • See Thesaurus:humble
Antonyms
  • arrogant
  • snobby
  • presumptuous
  • smug
Derived terms
Related terms
  • humbleness
  • humiliate
  • humiliation
  • humility
Translations

Verb

humble (third-person singular simple present humbles, present participle humbling, simple past and past participle humbled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To defeat or reduce the power, independence, or pride of
  2. (transitive, often reflexive) To make humble or lowly; to make less proud or arrogant; to make meek and submissive.
Synonyms
  • abase, lower, depress, humiliate, mortify, disgrace, degrade
Derived terms
  • humblehood
  • humbleness
  • humbler (agent noun)
  • humbly
Translations

Noun

humble (plural humbles)

  1. (Baltimore, slang) An arrest based on weak evidence intended to demean or punish the subject.

Etymology 2

From Middle English *humblen, *humbelen (suggested by humblynge (a humming, a faint rumbling)), frequentative of Middle English hummen (to hum), equivalent to hum +‎ -le.

Verb

humble (third-person singular simple present humbles, present participle humbling, simple past and past participle humbled)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To hum.
Derived terms
  • humblebee

Etymology 3

Noun

humble (plural humbles)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland, also attributive) Alternative form of hummel.

Verb

humble (third-person singular simple present humbles, present participle humbling, simple past and past participle humbled)

  1. (transitive) Alternative form of hummel.

Further reading

  • humble in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • humble in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

French

Etymology

From Old French, from Latin humilis (low, slight, hence mean, humble) (compare Greek χαμαλός (khamalós, on the ground, low, trifling)), from humus (the earth, ground), humi (on the ground).

Pronunciation

  • (mute h) IPA(key): /œ̃bl/
  • Rhymes: -œ̃bl
  • Homophone: humbles

Adjective

humble (plural humbles)

  1. humble

Related terms

  • àmha
  • à mon humble avis
  • humblement
  • humiliation
  • humilier
  • humilité

Further reading

  • “humble” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French

Adjective

humble m (oblique and nominative feminine singular humble)

  1. Alternative form of umble

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle English meinial, from Anglo-Norman mesnal, from maisnee (household), from Vulgar Latin mansionata, from Latin mansiōnem, accusative singular of mansiō (house).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: mē’nēəl, IPA(key): /ˈmiːni.əl/

Adjective

menial (comparative more menial, superlative most menial)

  1. Of or relating to work normally performed by a servant.
  2. Of or relating to unskilled work.
  3. Servile; low; mean.
    a menial wretch

Translations

Noun

menial (plural menials)

  1. A servant, especially a domestic servant.
  2. A person who has a subservient nature.

Related terms

  • mansion
  • maison, maisonette
  • menage

Translations

Anagrams

  • Elamin, Melian

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