humour vs wit what difference

what is difference between humour and wit

English

Alternative forms

  • humor (American)

Etymology

From Middle English humour, from Old French humor, from Latin humor, correctly umor (moisture), from humō, correctly umō (to be moist).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhjuː.mə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈhjuːmɚ/, /ˈjuːmɚ/
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mour
  • Rhymes: -uːmə(ɹ)

Noun

humour (usually uncountable, plural humours) (British spelling)

  1. (uncountable) The quality of being amusing, comical, funny. [from the early 18th c.]
    • 1774, Oliver Goldsmith, Retaliation
      For thy sake I admit / That a Scot may have humour, I’d almost said wit.
    • A great deal of excellent humour was expended on the perplexities of mine host.
    Synonyms: amusingness, comedy, comicality, wit
  2. (uncountable) A mood, especially a bad mood; a temporary state of mind or disposition brought upon by an event; an abrupt illogical inclination or whim.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Apophthegms
      a prince of a pleasant humour
    • 1684, Lord Roscommon, Essay on Translated Verse
      Examine how your humour is inclined, / And which the ruling passion of your mind.
    • Is my friend all perfection, all virtue and discretion? Has he not humours to be endured?
    Synonym: mood
  3. (archaic or historical) Any of the fluids in an animal body, especially the four “cardinal humours” of blood, yellow bile, black bile and phlegm that were believed to control the health and mood of the human body.
    • , Book I, New York 2001,page 147:
      A humour is a liquid or fluent part of the body, comprehended in it, for the preservation of it; and is either innate or born with us, or adventitious and acquisite.
    • 1763, Antoine-Simon Le Page Du Pratz, History of Louisisana (PG), (tr. 1774) page 42:
      For some days a fistula lacrymalis had come into my left eye, which discharged an humour, when pressed, that portended danger.
    Synonym: bodily fluid
  4. (medicine) Either of the two regions of liquid within the eyeball, the aqueous humour and vitreous humour.
  5. (obsolete) Moist vapour, moisture.

Synonyms

  • (something funny): comedy, wit, witticism

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

Translations

Verb

humour (third-person singular simple present humours, present participle humouring, simple past and past participle humoured)

  1. (transitive) To pacify by indulging.

Translations

See also

  • humour on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English humour. Doublet of humeur.

Pronunciation

  • (mute h) IPA(key): /y.muʁ/
  • Rhymes: -uʁ

Noun

humour m (plural humours)

  1. humor; comic effect in a communication or performance.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Romanian: humor, umor

Further reading

  • “humour” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From English humour. Doublet of umore.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈju.mor/

Noun

humour m (invariable)

  1. sense of humour

References

Further reading

  • humour in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • humore, umour, humor, humur, humer

Etymology

From Old French humor, from Latin hūmor, ūmor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /iu̯ˈmuːr/, /ˈiu̯mur/

Noun

humour (plural humours)

  1. A “cardinal humour” (four liquids believed to affect health and mood)
  2. A bodily liquid or substance that causes disease or affliction.
  3. A bodily liquid or substance that is caused by disease.
  4. One of the two (usually reckoned as three or four) fluidous portions of the eye.
  5. Any fluid; something which flows or moves in a fluidous manner:
    1. The liquid contained within a plant; plant juices.
    2. (rare) A liquid of the human body (e.g. blood)
  6. A mist or gas; a substance dissipated in the air.
  7. (rare) One of the four classical elements (fire, earth, air, and water).

Descendants

  • English: humour, humor
    • Chinese: 幽默 (yōumò)
    • Dutch: humor
    • French: humour
      • Romanian: humor, umor
    • German: Humor (semantic loan)
      • Polish: humor
      • Yiddish: הומאָר(humor) (probably)
    • Greek: χιούμορ (chioúmor)
    • Italian: humour
    • Japanese: ユーモア (yūmoa)
    • Korean: 유머 (yumeo)
    • Norwegian: (also via German)
      Bokmål: humor
      Nynorsk: humor
    • Russian: ю́мор (júmor)
      • Azerbaijani: yumor
    • Serbo-Croatian:
      Cyrillic: ху̀мор
      Latin: hùmor
    • Swedish: humor (semantic loan)
  • Scots: humour

References

  • “hūmǒur, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-12-09.

See also

  • (four humours) flewme,‎ coler,‎ malencolie,‎ sanguine [edit]

Old French

Noun

humour m or f

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of humor


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wĭt, IPA(key): /wɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt
  • Homophone: whit (in accents with the wine-whine merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English wit, from Old English witt (understanding, intellect, sense, knowledge, consciousness, conscience), from Proto-West Germanic *witi, from Proto-Germanic *witją (knowledge, reason), from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see, know).

Cognate with Dutch weet, German Witz, Danish vid, Swedish vett, Norwegian Bokmål vett, Gothic ???????????????????????? (unwiti, ignorance), Latin videō (see), Russian ви́деть (vídetʹ). Compare wise.

Noun

wit (countable and uncountable, plural wits)

  1. (now usually in the plural, plural only) Sanity.
  2. (obsolete usually in the plural) The senses.
  3. Intellectual ability; faculty of thinking, reasoning.
  4. The ability to think quickly; mental cleverness, especially under short time constraints.
  5. Intelligence; common sense.
    • 1460-1500, The Towneley Playsː
      I give the wit, I give the strength, of all thou seest, of breadth and length; thou shalt be wonder-wise, mirth and joy to have at will, all thy liking to fulfill, and dwell in paradise.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 23[1]:
      O, learn to read what silent love hath writ:
      To hear with eyes belongs to love’s fine wit.
  6. Humour, especially when clever or quick.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 37:
      …the cemetery—which people of shattering wit like Sampson never tired of calling ‘the dead centre of town’…
  7. A person who tells funny anecdotes or jokes; someone witty.
Synonyms
  • (intellectual ability): See also Thesaurus:intelligence
Derived terms
Translations

See also

(type of humor):

  • acid
  • biting
  • cutting
  • lambent

Etymology 2

From Middle English witen, from Old English witan, from Proto-West Germanic *witan, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see, know).

Cognate with Icelandic vita, Dutch weten, German wissen, Swedish veta, and Latin videō (I see). Compare guide.

Verb

wit (see below for this verb’s conjugation)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, chiefly archaic) Know, be aware of (constructed with of when used intransitively).
    • 1611, King James Version, Exodus 2:3–4:
      And when she could not longer hide him, she took for him an ark of bulrushes, and daubed it with slime and with pitch, and put the child therein; and she laid it in the flags by the river’s brink. And his sister stood afar off, to wit what would be done to him.
    • 1849, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, St. Luke the Painter, lines 5–8
      but soon having wist
      How sky-breadth and field-silence and this day
      Are symbols also in some deeper way,
      She looked through these to God and was God’s priest.
Usage notes
  • As a preterite-present verb, the third-person singular indicative form is not wits but wot; the plural indicative forms conform to the infinitive: we wit, ye wit, they wit.
  • To wit is now defective because it can only be used in the infinitive.
Conjugation
Derived terms
  • bewit
  • to wit
  • unwitting
  • witness
Translations

Etymology 3

From with.

Pronunciation

  • (Southern American English) (before consonants) IPA(key): /wɪt/, (before yod) /wɪtʃ/

Preposition

wit

  1. (Southern US) Pronunciation spelling of with.

Anagrams

  • Tiw, Twi, twi-

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch wit, from Middle Dutch wit, from Old Dutch *wit, from Proto-Germanic *hwittaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vət/

Adjective

wit (attributive witte, comparative witter, superlative witste)

  1. white

Balinese

Noun

wit

  1. tree
    Wénten wit poh akéh ring Nagara.

    There are many mango trees in Nagara.

Belizean Creole

Preposition

wit

  1. Alternative form of wid

References

  • Crosbie, Paul, ed. (2007), Kriol-Inglish Dikshineri: English-Kriol Dictionary. Belize City: Belize Kriol Project, p. 374.

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʋɪt/
  • Hyphenation: wit
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch wit, from Old Dutch *wit, from Proto-Germanic *hwittaz. The geminate is unexpected as the usual Proto-Germanic form is *hwītaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱweytos (shine; bright). The geminate is sometimes explained as being the result of Kluge’s law, thus from a pre-Germanic *kweyd-nos.

Adjective

wit (comparative witter, superlative witst)

  1. white
  2. (chiefly Surinam) having a white skin colour, light-skinned (see usage note)
  3. (Surinam) having a relatively light skin colour
  4. legal
  5. pure, untainted
  6. (archaic) clear-lighted, not dark at all
Usage notes

Recently, wit has come to be used in continental Dutch by some (associated with social justice movements) to refer to a specific skin colour, i.e. to light-skinned people of apparent mostly European descent. Traditionally, the adjective blank has been used there for this purpose, and this usage is by far the most widespread in the Netherlands and Belgium.

Inflection
Synonyms
  • blank
Antonyms
  • zwart
Derived terms
  • witte dovenetel, witte klaver, witwassen
Related terms
  • wijting

Noun

wit n (plural witten, diminutive witje n)

  1. (uncountable) white (color)
  2. (archaic) (short for doelwit (goal, target, the white in a bullseye))
  3. (slang) cocaine
    • 2011, Esther Schenk, Straatwaarde, Luitingh-Sijthoff B.V., →ISBN.
    • 2014, Helen Vreeswijk, Overdosis, Unieboek | Het Spectrum, →ISBN.
Derived terms
  • eiwit
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: wit
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: wete
  • Jersey Dutch: wät
  • Negerhollands: wit, wet

Verb

wit

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of witten
  2. imperative of witten

See also

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch wit. Ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *witi, from Proto-Germanic *witją (knowledge, reason), from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see, know). Related to weten (to know), wis (knowledge) and wijs (wise). Cognate with English wit, German Witz.

Noun

wit n (plural witten, diminutive witje n)

  1. (archaic) ability to think and reason
  2. (archaic) knowledge
Related terms
  • wittig, wittigen, wittiger, verwittigen

Anagrams

  • Twi

Gothic

Romanization

wit

  1. Romanization of ????????????

Javanese

Noun

wit

  1. tree
    Akèh wit pelem ing Semarang.

    There are many mango trees in Semarang.

Louisiana Creole French

Etymology

From French huit.

Numeral

wit

  1. eight

Mauritian Creole

Etymology

From French huit.

Numeral

wit

  1. eight

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *wit, from Proto-Germanic *hwittaz. The long-vowel variant wijt is from Old Dutch wīt, from Proto-West Germanic *hwīt, from Proto-Germanic *hwītaz.

Adjective

wit

  1. white
  2. clean
  3. pale (of skin)

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms

  • wijt

Descendants

  • Dutch: wit
  • Limburgish: wiet

Further reading

  • “wit”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “wit (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Middle English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wit/

Etymology 1

From Old English witt, from Proto-West Germanic *witi, from Proto-Germanic *witją.

Alternative forms

  • witt, witte, wytt, wyt

Noun

wit (plural wittes)

  1. mind, sanity
Descendants
  • English: wit
  • Yola: wut
References
  • “wit, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

From Old English wit (we two), from Proto-West Germanic *wit, from Proto-Germanic *wet. Compare the first-person plural pronoun we.

Alternative forms

  • wyt, witt

Pronoun

wit (accusative unk, genitive unker, possessive determiner unker)

  1. (Early Middle English) First-person dual pronoun: we twain, the two of us.
See also
References
  • “wit, pron.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 11 May 2018.

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian hwīt, from Proto-West Germanic *hwīt, from Proto-Germanic *hwītaz. Compare West Frisian wyt.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /vɪt/

Adjective

wit

  1. (Sylt) white

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *wit, from Proto-Germanic *wet, from Proto-Indo-European *wed-, a suffixed form of *wey- (see ). Cognate with North Frisian wat, Old Norse vit, Gothic ???????????? (wit), and Lithuanian vèdu.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wit/

Pronoun

wit (personal)

  1. we two; nominative dual of

Old French

Etymology

Spelling variant of uit

Numeral

wit

  1. eight

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *wīdaz, whence also Old Saxon wīt, Old English wīd and Old Norse víðr.

Adjective

wīt

  1. wide

Descendants

  • Middle High German: wīt
    • Central Franconian: weck
    • German: weit
    • Luxembourgish: wäit
    • Yiddish: ווײַט(vayt)

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *wit, from Proto-Germanic *wet. Accusative from Proto-Germanic *unk, dative from *unkiz.

Pronoun

wit

  1. we two; nominative dual of ik

Declension


Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English wheat.

Noun

wit

  1. wheat

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