humour vs witticism what difference

what is difference between humour and witticism

English

Alternative forms

  • humor (American)

Etymology

From Middle English humour, from Old French humor, from Latin humor, correctly umor (moisture), from humō, correctly umō (to be moist).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhjuː.mə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈhjuːmɚ/, /ˈjuːmɚ/
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mour
  • Rhymes: -uːmə(ɹ)

Noun

humour (usually uncountable, plural humours) (British spelling)

  1. (uncountable) The quality of being amusing, comical, funny. [from the early 18th c.]
    • 1774, Oliver Goldsmith, Retaliation
      For thy sake I admit / That a Scot may have humour, I’d almost said wit.
    • A great deal of excellent humour was expended on the perplexities of mine host.
    Synonyms: amusingness, comedy, comicality, wit
  2. (uncountable) A mood, especially a bad mood; a temporary state of mind or disposition brought upon by an event; an abrupt illogical inclination or whim.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Apophthegms
      a prince of a pleasant humour
    • 1684, Lord Roscommon, Essay on Translated Verse
      Examine how your humour is inclined, / And which the ruling passion of your mind.
    • Is my friend all perfection, all virtue and discretion? Has he not humours to be endured?
    Synonym: mood
  3. (archaic or historical) Any of the fluids in an animal body, especially the four “cardinal humours” of blood, yellow bile, black bile and phlegm that were believed to control the health and mood of the human body.
    • , Book I, New York 2001,page 147:
      A humour is a liquid or fluent part of the body, comprehended in it, for the preservation of it; and is either innate or born with us, or adventitious and acquisite.
    • 1763, Antoine-Simon Le Page Du Pratz, History of Louisisana (PG), (tr. 1774) page 42:
      For some days a fistula lacrymalis had come into my left eye, which discharged an humour, when pressed, that portended danger.
    Synonym: bodily fluid
  4. (medicine) Either of the two regions of liquid within the eyeball, the aqueous humour and vitreous humour.
  5. (obsolete) Moist vapour, moisture.

Synonyms

  • (something funny): comedy, wit, witticism

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

Translations

Verb

humour (third-person singular simple present humours, present participle humouring, simple past and past participle humoured)

  1. (transitive) To pacify by indulging.

Translations

See also

  • humour on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English humour. Doublet of humeur.

Pronunciation

  • (mute h) IPA(key): /y.muʁ/
  • Rhymes: -uʁ

Noun

humour m (plural humours)

  1. humor; comic effect in a communication or performance.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Romanian: humor, umor

Further reading

  • “humour” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From English humour. Doublet of umore.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈju.mor/

Noun

humour m (invariable)

  1. sense of humour

References

Further reading

  • humour in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • humore, umour, humor, humur, humer

Etymology

From Old French humor, from Latin hūmor, ūmor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /iu̯ˈmuːr/, /ˈiu̯mur/

Noun

humour (plural humours)

  1. A “cardinal humour” (four liquids believed to affect health and mood)
  2. A bodily liquid or substance that causes disease or affliction.
  3. A bodily liquid or substance that is caused by disease.
  4. One of the two (usually reckoned as three or four) fluidous portions of the eye.
  5. Any fluid; something which flows or moves in a fluidous manner:
    1. The liquid contained within a plant; plant juices.
    2. (rare) A liquid of the human body (e.g. blood)
  6. A mist or gas; a substance dissipated in the air.
  7. (rare) One of the four classical elements (fire, earth, air, and water).

Descendants

  • English: humour, humor
    • Chinese: 幽默 (yōumò)
    • Dutch: humor
    • French: humour
      • Romanian: humor, umor
    • German: Humor (semantic loan)
      • Polish: humor
      • Yiddish: הומאָר(humor) (probably)
    • Greek: χιούμορ (chioúmor)
    • Italian: humour
    • Japanese: ユーモア (yūmoa)
    • Korean: 유머 (yumeo)
    • Norwegian: (also via German)
      Bokmål: humor
      Nynorsk: humor
    • Russian: ю́мор (júmor)
      • Azerbaijani: yumor
    • Serbo-Croatian:
      Cyrillic: ху̀мор
      Latin: hùmor
    • Swedish: humor (semantic loan)
  • Scots: humour

References

  • “hūmǒur, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-12-09.

See also

  • (four humours) flewme,‎ coler,‎ malencolie,‎ sanguine [edit]

Old French

Noun

humour m or f

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of humor


English

Etymology

witty +‎ -icism; coined in the 1670s by John Dryden, by analogy to criticism.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈwɪ.tɪ.sɪz.əm/

Noun

witticism (plural witticisms)

  1. a witty remark
    • 1883: George Eliot, The Essays of George Eliot, chapter 4
      Shock of the witticism is a powerful one; while mere fun will have no power over them if it jar on their moral taste.
    • 2015: Hans Rollman, Freedom of Speech: It’s Complicated, PopMatters
      While the occasional wry witticism seeps through, overall Shipler is painfully conscientious about trying to offer both sides of any debate.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:joke

Translations

See also

  • bon mot
  • gag
  • jape
  • joke
  • one-liner

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