hunt vs search what difference

what is difference between hunt and search

English

Etymology

From Middle English hunten, from Old English huntian (to hunt), from Proto-Germanic *huntōną (to hunt, capture), from Proto-Indo-European *kend- (to catch, seize). Related to Old High German hunda (booty), Gothic ???????????????????? (hunþs, body of captives), Old English hūþ (plunder, booty, prey), Old English hentan (to catch, seize). More at hent, hint.
In some areas read as a collective form of hound by folk etymology.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hʌnt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌnt

Verb

hunt (third-person singular simple present hunts, present participle hunting, simple past and past participle hunted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To find or search for an animal in the wild with the intention of killing the animal for its meat or for sport.
    • Esau went to the field to hunt for venison.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, Locksley Hall
      Like a dog, he hunts in dreams.
    • 2010, Backyard deer hunting: converting deer to dinner for pennies per pound →ISBN, page 10:
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To try to find something; search (for).
    The police are hunting for evidence.
  3. (transitive) To drive; to chase; with down, from, away, etc.
    to hunt down a criminal
    He was hunted from the parish.
  4. (transitive) To use or manage (dogs, horses, etc.) in hunting.
    • He hunts a pack of dogs better than any man in the country.
  5. (transitive) To use or traverse in pursuit of game.
    He hunts the woods, or the country.
  6. (bell-ringing, transitive) To move or shift the order of (a bell) in a regular course of changes.
  7. (bell-ringing, intransitive) To shift up and down in order regularly.
  8. (engineering, intransitive) To be in a state of instability of movement or forced oscillation, as a governor which has a large movement of the balls for small change of load, an arc-lamp clutch mechanism which moves rapidly up and down with variations of current, etc.; also, to seesaw, as a pair of alternators working in parallel.

Derived terms

  • headhunt, head-hunt
  • hunt where the ducks are
  • that dog won’t hunt

Translations

Noun

hunt (plural hunts)

  1. The act of hunting.
  2. A hunting expedition.
  3. An organization devoted to hunting, or the people belonging to it.
  4. A pack of hunting dogs.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Thun

Bavarian

Noun

hunt ? 

  1. (Sappada, Sauris, Timau) dog

References

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

Cimbrian

Noun

hunt m

  1. dog

References

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Estonian

Etymology

Most likely from Middle Low German hunt.
Possibly an earlier loan from Proto-Germanic *hundaz.

Noun

hunt (genitive hundi, partitive hunti)

  1. wolf, grey wolf

Declension

Synonyms

  • susi
  • untsantsakas
  • hall hunt

Mòcheno

Etymology

From Middle High German hunt, from Old High German hunt, from Proto-West Germanic *hund, from Proto-Germanic *hundaz (dog). Cognate with German Hund, English hound.

Noun

hunt m

  1. dog

References

  • “hunt” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *hund.

Noun

hunt m

  1. dog

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: hont
    • Dutch: hond

Further reading

  • “hunt (I)”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *hund.

Noun

hunt m

  1. dog

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle High German: hunt
    • Alemannic German: Hund
      Alsatian: Hund
      Swabian: Hond
      Walser: hun, hund, hunn, hònn
    • Bavarian:
      Cimbrian: hunt
      Mòcheno: hunt
      Udinese: hunt
    • Central Franconian: Hond, Honk, Honk
      Hunsrik: Hund
      Kölsch: Hunk, Hungk
    • German: Hund
      • Esperanto: hundo
        • Ido: hundo
    • Luxembourgish: Hond
    • Vilamovian: hund
    • Yiddish: הונט(hunt)


English

Etymology

From Middle English serchen, borrowed from Anglo-Norman sercher, Old French cerchier, from Late Latin circō, circāre (to circle; go around; search for), from Latin circa, circus. Not related to German suchen, which has a similar spelling and is cognate with English seek.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /sɜːt͡ʃ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /sɝt͡ʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)tʃ

Noun

search (countable and uncountable, plural searches)

  1. An attempt to find something.
    • 2012 October 31, David M. Halbfinger, “[1],” New York Times (retrieved 31 October 2012):
      At least eight people died, and officials expressed deep concerns that the toll would rise as more searches of homes were carried out.
  2. The act of searching in general.

Related terms

  • research

Translations

Verb

search (third-person singular simple present searches, present participle searching, simple past and past participle searched)

  1. (transitive) To look in (a place) for something.
  2. (intransitive, followed by “for”) To look thoroughly.
    • He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance. [] But she said she must go back, and when they joined the crowd again [] she found her mother standing up before the seat on which she had sat all the evening searching anxiously for her with her eyes, and her father by her side.
  3. (transitive, now rare) To look for, seek.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.vi:
      To search the God of loue, her Nymphes she sent / Throughout the wandring forrest euery where [].
    • For thus saith the Lord God; Behold, I, even I, will both search my sheep, and seek them out.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To probe or examine (a wound).
    • 1588, William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus, II.3:
      Now to the bottome dost thou search my wound.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.4:
      Thus when they all had sorowed their fill, / They softly gan to search his griesly wownd [].
  5. (obsolete) To examine; to try; to put to the test.

Synonyms

  • (transitive: look throughout (a place) for something): comb, scour
  • (intransitive: look thoroughly): look for, seek, comb, scour

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • google
  • look

Anagrams

  • Arches, Ascher, Rasche, Schaer, achers, arches, arsech, casher, chares, chaser, eschar, raches

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