hurdle vs vault what difference

what is difference between hurdle and vault

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hûr’dəl, IPA(key): /ˈhɜːdəl/
  • (US) enPR: hûr’dəl, IPA(key): /ˈhɝdəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)dəl

Etymology 1

From Middle English hurdel, hirdel, herdel, hyrdel, from Old English hyrdel (frame of intertwined twigs used as a temporary barrier), diminutive of *hyrd, from Proto-Germanic *hurdiz, from Pre-Germanic *kr̥h₂tis, from Proto-Indo-European *kreh₂-. Cognate with Dutch horde, German Hürde.

Noun

hurdle (plural hurdles)

  1. An artificial barrier, variously constructed, over which athletes or horses jump in a race.
    He ran in the 100 metres hurdles.
  2. A perceived obstacle.
  3. A movable frame of wattled twigs, osiers, or withes and stakes, or sometimes of iron, used for enclosing land, for folding sheep and cattle, for gates, etc.; also, in fortification, used as revetments, and for other purposes.
  4. (Britain, obsolete) A sled or crate on which criminals were formerly drawn to the place of execution.
    • 1550, Francis Bacon, A Preparation Toward the Union of Laws, in The Works of Francis Bacon, edited by James Spedding, Robert Leslie Ellis, and Douglas Denon Heath, London: Longman, Green & Co., Vol. VII, p. 735, [1]
      In treason, the corporal punishment is by drawing on hurdle from the place of the prison to the place of execution, and by hanging and being cut down alive, bowelling, and quartering: and in women by burning.
    • 1855, Matthew Arnold, Balder Dead, Part II, in The Poems of Matthew Arnold, 1840-1867, Oxford University Press, 1909, pp. 250-51, [2]
      Behind flock’d wrangling up a piteous crew, / Greeted of none, disfeatur’d and forlorn— / Cowards, who were in sloughs interr’d alive: / And round them still the wattled hurdles hung / Wherewith they stamp’d them down, and trod them deep, / To hide their shameful memory from men.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:hindrance
Descendants
  • Japanese: ハードル (hādoru)
Translations

Verb

hurdle (third-person singular simple present hurdles, present participle hurdling, simple past and past participle hurdled)

  1. To jump over something while running.
  2. To compete in the track and field events of hurdles (e.g. high hurdles).
  3. To overcome an obstacle.
  4. To hedge, cover, make, or enclose with hurdles.
Translations

Further reading

  • Hurdle on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

Noun

hurdle (plural hurdles)

  1. (T-flapping) Misspelling of hurtle.

Verb

hurdle (third-person singular simple present hurdles, present participle hurdling, simple past and past participle hurdled)

  1. (T-flapping) Misspelling of hurtle.

Anagrams

  • huldre, hurled


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /vɒlt/, /vɔːlt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /vɑlt/, /vɔlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːlt, -ɒlt
  • Homophone: volt (in some accents)
  • The l was originally suppressed in pronunciation.

Etymology 1

From Middle English vaute, vowte, from Old French volte (modern voûte), from Vulgar Latin *volta < *volvita or *volŭta, a regularization of Latin volūta (compare modern volute (spire)), the past participle of volvere (roll, turn). Cognate with Spanish vuelta (turn). Doublet of volute.

Noun

vault (plural vaults)

  1. An arched masonry structure supporting and forming a ceiling, whether freestanding or forming part of a larger building.
    • 1751, Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
      the long-drawn aisle and fretted vault
  2. Any arched ceiling or roof.
  3. (figuratively) Anything resembling such a downward-facing concave structure, particularly the sky and caves.
    • 1636, George Sandys, A Paraphrase on Job
      the silent vaults of death
    • 1985, Bible (NJB), Genesis, 1:6:
      God said, ‘Let there be a vault through the middle of the waters to divide the waters in two.’
  4. The space covered by an arched roof, particularly underground rooms and (Christianity, obsolete) church crypts.
  5. Any cellar or underground storeroom.
    • 1730, Jonathan Swift, A Panegyrick on the Dean
      to banish rats that haunt our vault
  6. Any burial chamber, particularly those underground.
  7. The secure room or rooms in or below a bank used to store currency and other valuables; similar rooms in other settings.
  8. (often figuratively) Any archive of past content.
  9. (computing) An encrypted digital archive.
  10. (obsolete) An underground or covered conduit for water or waste; a drain; a sewer.
  11. (obsolete) An underground or covered reservoir for water or waste; a cistern; a cesspit.
  12. (obsolete, euphemistic) A room employing a cesspit or sewer: an outhouse; a lavatory.
Synonyms
  • (outhouse or lavatory): See Thesaurus:bathroom
  • (gymnastic apparatus): vaulting table
Hyponyms
Translations

Verb

vault (third-person singular simple present vaults, present participle vaulting, simple past and past participle vaulted)

  1. (transitive) To build as, or cover with a vault.
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Middle French volter (to turn or spin around; to frolic), borrowed from Italian voltare, itself from a Vulgar Latin frequentative form of Latin volvere; later assimilated to Etymology 1, above.

Verb

vault (third-person singular simple present vaults, present participle vaulting, simple past and past participle vaulted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To jump or leap over.
Derived terms
  • vaulter
  • vaulting
Translations

Noun

vault (plural vaults)

  1. An act of vaulting, formerly (chiefly) by deer; a leap or jump.
  2. (gymnastics) A piece of apparatus used for performing jumps.
  3. (gymnastics) A gymnastic movement performed on this apparatus.
  4. (equestrianism) Synonym of volte: a circular movement by the horse.
  5. (gymnastics) An event or performance involving a vaulting horse.
Translations

See also

  • pole vault
  • vaulting horse

Further reading

  • vault on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

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