hurry vs rush what difference

what is difference between hurry and rush

English

Etymology

From Middle English horien (to rush, impel), probably a variation of hurren (to vibrate rapidly, buzz), from Proto-Germanic *hurzaną (to rush) (compare Middle High German hurren (to hasten), Norwegian hurre (to whirl around)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱers- (to run) (compare Latin currō (I run), Tocharian A kursär/Tocharian B kwärsar (league; course)). Related to hurr, horse, rush.

Alternative etymology derives hurry as a variant of harry, which see.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhʌɹ.i/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhʌɹ.i/ (accents without the hurryfurry merger)
  • (US) IPA(key): [ˈhɝ.i] (accents with the hurryfurry merger)
  • Rhymes: -ʌri

Noun

hurry (countable and uncountable, plural hurries)

  1. Rushed action.
  2. Urgency.
  3. (American football) an incidence of a defensive player forcing the quarterback to act faster than the quarterback was prepared to, resulting in a failed offensive play.
  4. (music) A tremolando passage for violins, etc., accompanying an exciting situation.

Derived terms

  • in a hurry

Translations

Verb

hurry (third-person singular simple present hurries, present participle hurrying, simple past and past participle hurried)

  1. (intransitive) To do things quickly.
  2. (intransitive) Often with up, to speed up the rate of doing something.
  3. (transitive) To cause to be done quickly.
  4. (transitive) To hasten; to impel to greater speed; to urge on.
    • the rapid Stream presently draws him in , carries him away , and hurries him down violently.
  5. (transitive) To impel to precipitate or thoughtless action; to urge to confused or irregular activity.
  6. (mining) To put: to convey coal in the mine, e.g. from the working to the tramway.
    • 1842, The Condition and Treatment of the Children Employed in the Mines, page 45:
      Elizabeth Day, aged seventeen [] “I have been nearly nine years in the pit. I trapped for two years when I first went, and have hurried ever since. I have hurried for my father until a year ago. I have to help to riddle and fill, []

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:rush

Translations

See also

  • haste
  • hurry up
  • di di mau


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹʌʃ/
  • Homophone: Rush
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English risshe, rusch, risch, from Old English rysċ, rysċe, risċ, risċe, from a merger of Proto-West Germanic *riskijā, from Proto-Indo-European *resg- (to weave) and Proto-West Germanic *ruskijā, borrowed from Latin rūscum (butcher’s broom), of unknown origin + *-jā (animal and plant suffix). Cognates include West Frisian risk, Dutch rus (bulrush), Norwegian Bokmål rusk, dialectal Norwegian ryskje (hair-grass).

Noun

rush (plural rushes)

  1. Any of several stiff plants of the genus Juncus, or the family Juncaceae, having hollow or pithy stems and small flowers, and often growing in marshes or near water.
  2. The stem of such plants used in making baskets, mats, the seats of chairs, etc.
  3. The merest trifle; a straw.
    • 1712, John Arbuthnot, The History of John Bull
      John Bull’s friendship is not worth a rush.
  4. A wick.
Synonyms
  • (plant of the genus Juncus): juncus
Translations

Etymology 2

Perhaps from Middle English ruschen, russchen (to rush, startle, make a loud rushing noise), from Old English hrysċan (to jolt, startle), from Proto-Germanic *hurskijaną (to startle, drive), from *hurskaz (fast, rapid, quick), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱers- (to run, hurry).

Cognate with Old High German hurscan (to speed, accelerate), Old English horsc (quick, quick-witted, clever).

Noun

rush (plural rushes)

  1. A sudden forward motion.
    • 1642, Henry Wotton, A Short View of the Life and Death of George Villiers
      A gentleman of his train spurred up his horse, and, with a violent rush, severed him from the duke.
  2. A surge.
  3. General haste.
  4. A rapid, noisy flow.
  5. (military) A sudden attack; an onslaught.
  6. (video games) The strategy of attacking an opponent with a large swarm of weak units, rather than spending time developing their abilities.
    Synonym: zerg
  7. (contact sports) The act of running at another player to block or disrupt play.
  8. (American football, dated) A rusher; a lineman.
  9. A sudden, brief exhilaration, for instance the pleasurable sensation produced by a stimulant.
  10. (US, figuratively) A regulated period of recruitment in fraternities and sororities.
  11. (US, dated, college slang) A perfect recitation.
  12. (croquet) A roquet in which the object ball is sent to a particular location on the lawn.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

rush (third-person singular simple present rushes, present participle rushing, simple past and past participle rushed)

  1. (transitive or intransitive) To hurry; to perform a task with great haste.
    • c. 1683, Robert West, The further Exmaination of Robert West of the Middle-Temple, Barrister at Law
      A party of men [] shoud be ready to rush out; and upon the noise of the first shot immediately run down to the Gate and break in.
  2. (intransitive) To flow or move forward rapidly or noisily.
  3. (intransitive, soccer) To dribble rapidly.
  4. (transitive or intransitive, contact sports) To run directly at another player in order to block or disrupt play.
  5. (transitive) To cause to move or act with unusual haste.
  6. (intransitive, military) To make a swift or sudden attack.
  7. (military) To swiftly attack without warning.
  8. (video games, slang, transitive) To attack (an opponent) with a large swarm of units.
    Synonym: zerg
  9. (transitive or intransitive, US, college) To attempt to join a fraternity or sorority; to undergo hazing or initiation in order to join a fraternity or sorority.
  10. (transitive) To transport or carry quickly.
  11. (transitive or intransitive, croquet) To roquet an object ball to a particular location on the lawn.
  12. (US, slang, dated) To recite (a lesson) or pass (an examination) without an error.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:rush (hurry)
Derived terms
  • downrush
  • rushing
Translations

Adjective

rush (not comparable)

  1. Performed with, or requiring urgency or great haste, or done under pressure.
Usage notes

Used only before a noun.

See also

  • rushes

Further reading

  • Juncaceae on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Rush_(football) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Hurs, RHUs, Suhr

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English rush

Noun

rush n (definite singular rushet, indefinite plural rush, definite plural rusha or rushene)

  1. a rush (Etymology 2)

Derived terms

  • gullrush
  • rushtid

References

  • “rush” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “rush” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English rush

Noun

rush n (definite singular rushet, indefinite plural rush, definite plural rusha)

  1. a rush (Etymology 2)

Derived terms

  • gullrush
  • rushtid

References

  • “rush” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

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