hurt vs pain what difference

what is difference between hurt and pain

English

Etymology

From Middle English hurten, hirten, hertan (to injure, scathe, knock together), from Old Northern French hurter (“to ram into, strike, collide with”; > Modern French heurter), perhaps from Frankish *hūrt (a battering ram), from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną (to fall, beat), from Proto-Indo-European *krew- (to fall, beat, smash, strike, break); however, the earliest instances of the verb in Middle English are as old as those found in Old French, which leads to the possibility that the Middle English word may instead be a reflex of an unrecorded Old English *hȳrtan, which later merged with the Old French verb. Germanic cognates include Dutch horten (to push against, strike), Middle Low German hurten (to run at, collide with), Middle High German hurten (to push, bump, attack, storm, invade), Old Norse hrútr (battering ram).

Alternate etymology traces Old Northern French hurter rather to Old Norse hrútr (ram (male sheep)), lengthened-grade variant of hjǫrtr (stag), from Proto-Germanic *herutuz, *herutaz (hart, male deer), which would relate it to English hart (male deer). See hart.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hû(r)t, IPA(key): /hɜːt/
  • (General American) enPR: hûrt, IPA(key): /hɝt/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)t

Verb

hurt (third-person singular simple present hurts, present participle hurting, simple past and past participle hurt)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To cause (a person or animal) physical pain and/or injury.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To cause (somebody) emotional pain.
    He was deeply hurt he hadn’t been invited.
    The insult hurt.
  3. (intransitive) To be painful.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To damage, harm, impair, undermine, impede.
    Copying and pasting identical portions of source code hurts maintainability, because the programmer has to keep all those copies synchronized.
    Every little hurts.

Synonyms

  • (to be painful): smart
  • (to cause physical pain and/or injury): wound, injure, dere

Derived terms

  • hurtle
  • wouldn’t hurt a fly

Translations

See also

  • ache

Adjective

hurt (comparative more hurt, superlative most hurt)

  1. Wounded, physically injured.
  2. Pained.

Synonyms

  • (wounded): imbrued, injured, wounded; see also Thesaurus:wounded
  • (pained): aching, sore, suffering

Translations

Noun

hurt (plural hurts)

  1. An emotional or psychological humiliation or bad experience.
  2. (archaic) A bodily injury causing pain; a wound or bruise.
    • 1605, Shakespeare, King Lear vii
      I have received a hurt.
    • The cause is a temperate conglutination ; for both bodies are clammy and viscous , and do bridle the deflux of humours to the hurts , without penning them in too much
    • The pains of sickness and hurts [] all men feel.
  3. (archaic) injury; damage; detriment; harm
  4. (heraldry) A roundel azure (blue circular spot).
  5. (engineering) A band on a trip-hammer helve, bearing the trunnions.
  6. A husk.

Translations

Related terms

  • hurty

References

Anagrams

  • Ruth, Thur, ruth, thru, thur

German

Verb

hurt

  1. inflection of huren:
    1. third-person singular present
    2. second-person plural present
    3. plural imperative

Polish

Etymology

From Middle High German hurt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xurt/

Noun

hurt m inan

  1. wholesale

Declension

Derived terms

  • (adjective) hurtowy
  • (nouns) hurtownia, hurtownik

Further reading

  • hurt in Polish dictionaries at PWN


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English peyne, payne, from Old French and Anglo-Norman peine, paine, from Latin poena (punishment, pain), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, bloodmoney, weregild, fine, price paid, penalty). Compare Danish pine, Norwegian Bokmål pine, German Pein, Dutch pijn, Afrikaans pyn. See also pine (the verb). Partially displaced native Old English sār (whence English sore).

Alternative forms

  • paine (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: pʰān, IPA(key): /peɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn
  • Homophone: pane

Noun

pain (countable and uncountable, plural pains)

  1. (countable and uncountable) An ache or bodily suffering, or an instance of this; an unpleasant sensation, resulting from a derangement of functions, disease, or injury by violence; hurt.
  2. (uncountable) The condition or fact of suffering or anguish especially mental, as opposed to pleasure; torment; distress
  3. (countable, from pain in the neck) An annoying person or thing.
  4. (uncountable, obsolete) Suffering inflicted as punishment or penalty.
  5. (chiefly in the plural) Labour; effort; great care or trouble taken in doing something.
Usage notes
  • Adjectives often used with “pain”: mild, moderate, severe, intense, excruciating, debilitating, acute, chronic, sharp, dull, burning, steady, throbbing, stabbing, spasmodic, etc.
Synonyms
  • (an annoying person or thing): pest
  • See also Thesaurus:pain
Antonyms
  • pleasure
Hyponyms
  • agony
  • anguish
  • pang
  • neuropathic pain
  • nociceptive pain
  • phantom pain
  • psychogenic pain
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

pain (third-person singular simple present pains, present participle paining, simple past and past participle pained)

  1. (transitive) To hurt; to put to bodily uneasiness or anguish; to afflict with uneasy sensations of any degree of intensity; to torment; to torture.
    The wound pained him.
  2. (transitive) To render uneasy in mind; to disquiet; to distress; to grieve.
    It pains me to say that I must let you go.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To inflict suffering upon as a penalty; to punish.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English payn (a kind of pie with a soft crust), from Old French pain (bread).

Noun

pain (plural pains)

  1. (obsolete, cooking) Any of various breads stuffed with a filling.
    gammon pain; Spanish pain

References

  • pain in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • pain in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • pain at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • APNI, NIPA, PANI, nipa, pian, pina, piña

Bilbil

Etymology

From Proto-Oceanic *papine, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *babinahi, from Proto-Austronesian *bahi.

Noun

pain

  1. woman

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)

Finnish

Noun

pain

  1. inflection of pai:
    1. genitive singular
    2. instructive plural

Anagrams

  • apin, pani, pian

French

Etymology

From Old French pain, from Latin pānis, pānem, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to feed, to graze).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɛ̃/
  • Homophones: pains, peins, peint, peints, pin, pins

Noun

pain m (plural pains)

  1. bread
  2. piece of bread
  3. food
    • 1830 Juvénal, Les Satires, translated into French verse by Barré de Jallais
      Sa nudité déplaît, sa détresse importune, / Et tous les jours, hélas ! à tout le monde en vain / Il demande une chambre, un habit et du pain.

      His nudity embarrasses, his distress importunes, / And all the days, alas! to everyone in vain / He ask a bedroom, clothes and foods.
  4. bread-and-butter needs, basic sustenance; breadwinner
    • 1830 Juvénal, Les Satires, translated into French verse by Barré de Jallais
      Ce danseur, déployant une jambe soigneuse / À tenir l’équilibre, et la corde douteuse, / Trouve dans son talent des habits et du pain, / Et son art lui subjugue et le froid et la faim : […]
  5. (informal) punch (a hit with the fist)
    • 2006, Maurice Léger, Moi, Antoinette Védrines, thanatopractrice et pilier de rugby, Publibook
      J’étais redescendue dare-dare, bien décidée à lui mettre un pain dans la tronche.

      I was redescended quickly, really steadfast to blow him a punch on his face.
  6. a block (of ice, of salt, of soap …) with the shape and size of bread
  7. (slang) (music) mistake during a performance (false note, forgot an intro, wrong solo, …)

Derived terms

Related terms

  • panier

Descendants

  • Haitian Creole: pen
  • Karipúna Creole French: djipẽ
  • Farefare: pãanɛ

Further reading

  • “pain” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • pina

Gedaged

Etymology

From Proto-Oceanic *papine, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *babinahi, from Proto-Austronesian *bahi.

Noun

pain

  1. woman

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)
  • ABVD
  • Gedaged Bible translation, Genesis 1:27: Tamol pain mai inaulak.

Matukar

Etymology

From Proto-Oceanic *papine, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *babinahi, from Proto-Austronesian *bahi.

Noun

pain

  1. woman

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)

Norman

Alternative forms

  • pôin (Guernsey)

Etymology

From Old French pain.

Pronunciation

Noun

pain m (plural pains)

  1. (Jersey) bread

Derived terms

  • gângne-pain (breadwinner)
  • pain d’êpice (gingerbread)
  • p’tit pain (roll)

Old French

Etymology

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Noun

pain m (oblique plural painz, nominative singular painz, nominative plural pain)

  1. bread

Descendants

  • French: pain
    • Haitian Creole: pen
    • Karipúna Creole French: djipẽ
    • Farefare: pãanɛ
  • Norman: pain, pôin
  • Walloon: pwin, pan
  • Middle English: payn, pain, paine, payn, pein
    • English: pain (obsolete)

Ronji

Etymology

From Proto-Oceanic *papine, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *babinahi, from Proto-Austronesian *bahi.

Noun

pain

  1. woman

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)

Tagalog

Noun

pain

  1. bait (for catching fish, rats, etc.)
  2. decoy
  3. nest egg

Wab

Etymology

From Proto-Oceanic *papine, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *babinahi, from Proto-Austronesian *bahi.

Noun

pain

  1. woman

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)

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