hurt vs smart what difference

what is difference between hurt and smart

English

Etymology

From Middle English hurten, hirten, hertan (to injure, scathe, knock together), from Old Northern French hurter (“to ram into, strike, collide with”; > Modern French heurter), perhaps from Frankish *hūrt (a battering ram), from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną (to fall, beat), from Proto-Indo-European *krew- (to fall, beat, smash, strike, break); however, the earliest instances of the verb in Middle English are as old as those found in Old French, which leads to the possibility that the Middle English word may instead be a reflex of an unrecorded Old English *hȳrtan, which later merged with the Old French verb. Germanic cognates include Dutch horten (to push against, strike), Middle Low German hurten (to run at, collide with), Middle High German hurten (to push, bump, attack, storm, invade), Old Norse hrútr (battering ram).

Alternate etymology traces Old Northern French hurter rather to Old Norse hrútr (ram (male sheep)), lengthened-grade variant of hjǫrtr (stag), from Proto-Germanic *herutuz, *herutaz (hart, male deer), which would relate it to English hart (male deer). See hart.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hû(r)t, IPA(key): /hɜːt/
  • (General American) enPR: hûrt, IPA(key): /hɝt/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)t

Verb

hurt (third-person singular simple present hurts, present participle hurting, simple past and past participle hurt)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To cause (a person or animal) physical pain and/or injury.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To cause (somebody) emotional pain.
    He was deeply hurt he hadn’t been invited.
    The insult hurt.
  3. (intransitive) To be painful.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To damage, harm, impair, undermine, impede.
    Copying and pasting identical portions of source code hurts maintainability, because the programmer has to keep all those copies synchronized.
    Every little hurts.

Synonyms

  • (to be painful): smart
  • (to cause physical pain and/or injury): wound, injure, dere

Derived terms

  • hurtle
  • wouldn’t hurt a fly

Translations

See also

  • ache

Adjective

hurt (comparative more hurt, superlative most hurt)

  1. Wounded, physically injured.
  2. Pained.

Synonyms

  • (wounded): imbrued, injured, wounded; see also Thesaurus:wounded
  • (pained): aching, sore, suffering

Translations

Noun

hurt (plural hurts)

  1. An emotional or psychological humiliation or bad experience.
  2. (archaic) A bodily injury causing pain; a wound or bruise.
    • 1605, Shakespeare, King Lear vii
      I have received a hurt.
    • The cause is a temperate conglutination ; for both bodies are clammy and viscous , and do bridle the deflux of humours to the hurts , without penning them in too much
    • The pains of sickness and hurts [] all men feel.
  3. (archaic) injury; damage; detriment; harm
  4. (heraldry) A roundel azure (blue circular spot).
  5. (engineering) A band on a trip-hammer helve, bearing the trunnions.
  6. A husk.

Translations

Related terms

  • hurty

References

Anagrams

  • Ruth, Thur, ruth, thru, thur

German

Verb

hurt

  1. inflection of huren:
    1. third-person singular present
    2. second-person plural present
    3. plural imperative

Polish

Etymology

From Middle High German hurt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xurt/

Noun

hurt m inan

  1. wholesale

Declension

Derived terms

  • (adjective) hurtowy
  • (nouns) hurtownia, hurtownik

Further reading

  • hurt in Polish dictionaries at PWN


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /smɑɹt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /smɑːt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)t

Etymology 1

From Middle English smerten, from Old English smeortan (to smart), from Proto-Germanic *smertaną (to hurt, ache), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)merd- (to bite, sting). Cognate with Scots smert, Dutch smarten, German schmerzen, Danish smerte, Swedish smärta.

Verb

smart (third-person singular simple present smarts, present participle smarting, simple past smarted or (obsolete) smort, past participle smarted or (obsolete) smorten)

  1. (intransitive) To hurt or sting.
  2. (transitive) To cause a smart or sting in.
    • a. 1652, Thomas Adams, Faith’s Encouragement
      A goad that [] smarts the flesh.
  3. (intransitive) To feel a pungent pain of mind; to feel sharp pain or grief; be punished severely; to feel the sting of evil.
    • He that is surety for a stranger shall smart for it.
Derived terms
  • arsesmart
  • besmart
  • nosesmart
  • smartful
  • smarting
  • smartweed
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English smert, smart, from Old English smeart (smarting, smart, painful), from Proto-Germanic *smartaz (hurting, aching), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)merd- (to bite, sting). Cognate with Scots smert (painful, smart), Old Frisian smert (sharp, painful).

Adjective

smart (comparative smarter or more smart, superlative smartest or most smart)

  1. Exhibiting social ability or cleverness.
    Synonyms: bright, capable, sophisticated, witty
    Antonyms: backward, banal, boorish, dull, inept
  2. (informal) Exhibiting intellectual knowledge, such as that found in books.
    Synonyms: cultivated, educated, learned; see also Thesaurus:learned
    Antonyms: ignorant, uncultivated, simple
  3. (often in combination) Equipped with intelligent behaviour (digital/computer technology).
  4. Good-looking; well dressed; fine; fashionable.
    Synonyms: attractive, chic, dapper, stylish, handsome
    Antonyms: garish, outré, tacky
  5. Cleverly shrewd and humorous in a way that may be rude and disrespectful.
    Synonym: silly
    • 1728, Edward Young, Satire
      Who, for the poor renown of being smart / Would leave a sting within a brother’s heart?
    • I played a sentence or two at my butt, which I thought very smart, when my ill genius, who I verily believed inspired him purely for my destruction, suggested to him such a reply
  6. Sudden and intense.
    • 1860 July 9, Henry David Thoreau, journal entry, from Thoreau’s bird-lore, Francis H. Allen (editor), Houghton Mifflin (Boston, 1910), Thoreau on Birds: notes on New England birds from the Journals of Henry David Thoreau, Beacon Press, (Boston, 1993), page 239:
      There is a smart shower at 5 P.M., and in the midst of it a hummingbird is busy about the flowers in the garden, unmindful of it, though you would think that each big drop that struck him would be a serious accident.
  7. Causing sharp pain; stinging.
  8. Sharp; keen; poignant.
  9. (Southern US, dated) Intense in feeling; painful. Used usually with the adverb intensifier right.
  10. (archaic) Efficient; vigorous; brilliant.
  11. (archaic) Pretentious; showy; spruce.
  12. (archaic) Brisk; fresh.
Related terms
Descendants
  • Danish: smart
  • German: smart
  • Norwegian:
    • Norwegian Bokmål: smart
    • Norwegian Nynorsk: smart
  • Swedish: smart
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English smerte, from smerten (to smart); see above. Cognate with Scots smert, Dutch smart, Low German smart, German Schmerz, Danish smerte, Swedish smärta. More above.

Noun

smart (plural smarts)

  1. A sharp, quick, lively pain; a sting.
    • 1567, Arthur Golding (translator), The XV Bookes of P. Ouidius Naso, entytuled Metamorphosis, London: William Seres, Book , p. 51,[2]
      [] the bodie had no smart
      Of any wound: it was the minde that felt the cruell stings.
    • 1716, Alexander Pope (translator), The Iliad of Homer, London: Bernard Lintot, Volume 2, Book 5, lines 176-178, p. 25,[3]
      If chance some Shepherd with a distant Dart
      The Savage wound, he rowzes at the Smart,
      He foams, he roars []
    • 1871, Louisa May Alcott, Little Men, Chapter 12,[4]
      Of course Tommy came to grief, tumbled upon a hornets’ nest and got stung; but being used to woe, he bore the smart manfully []
    • 1948, Graham Greene, The Heart of the Matter, London: Heinemann, Book One, Part One, Chapter 1, section 8, p. 42,[5]
      The smart of his wounded hand woke Scobie at two in the morning.
  2. Mental pain or suffering; grief; affliction.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 1, Canto 7, p. 101,[6]
      Mishaps are maistred by aduice discrete,
      And counsell mitigates the greatest smart;
      Found neuer help, who neuer would his hurts impart.
    • 1673, John Milton, “Anno aetatis 17. On the Death of a fair Infant dying of a Cough” in Poems, &c. upon Several Occasions Both English and Latin, London: Thomas Dring, p. 20,[7]
      But oh why didst thou not stay here below
      To bless us with thy heav’n lov’d innocence, []
      To stand ’twixt us and our deserved smart
      But thou canst best perform that office where thou art.
    • 1861, Charles Dickens, Great Expectations, Chapter 8,[8]
      I was so humiliated, hurt, spurned, offended, angry, sorry,—I cannot hit upon the right name for the smart—God knows what its name was,—that tears started to my eyes.
    • 2004, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, London: Picador, Chapter 9, p. 250,[9]
      [] Bertrand said, ‘No, you bloody idiot, do you think I drink this? I want mineral water.’ The girl recoiled for just a second at the smart of his tone [] and then apologized with steely insincerity.
  3. Smart-money.
  4. (slang, dated) A dandy; one who is smart in dress; one who is brisk, vivacious, or clever.
    • 1742, Henry Fielding, Joseph Andrews, London: A. Millar, 3rd edition, 1743, Volume 2, Book 3, Chapter 3, p. 27,[10]
      [] I resolved to quit all further Conversation with Beaus and Smarts of every kind []
Derived terms
  • smartful

Anagrams

  • MSTAR, marts, stram, tarms, trams

Danish

Etymology

From English smart

Adjective

smart (neuter smart, plural and definite singular attributive smarte, comparative smartere, superlative (predicative) smartest, superlative (attributive) smarteste)

  1. (of a solution, contraption, plan etc.) well thought-out, neat
  2. snazzy, fashionable, dapper

Derived terms

  • oversmart

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • smert (dialectal)

Etymology

From Middle Dutch smarte, from Proto-Germanic *smertaną. Cf. German Schmerz, English smart.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /smɑrt/
  • Hyphenation: smart
  • Rhymes: -ɑrt

Noun

smart f (plural smarten)

  1. pain, sorrow, grief

Derived terms

  • gedeelde smart is halve smart
  • met smart
  • smartengeld

Descendants

  • Negerhollands: smert, smerte

German

Etymology

Borrowed from English smart, 19th c.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /smaːɐ̯t/, /smaʁt/

Adjective

smart (comparative smarter, superlative am smartesten)

  1. smart (exhibiting social ability or cleverness)
    Synonyms: aufgeweckt, clever, gewitzt, pfiffig
  2. smart (good-looking, well-dressed)
    Synonyms: chic, elegant, fein

Declension

Further reading

  • “smart” in Duden online
  • “smart” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Middle English

Adjective

smart

  1. Alternative form of smert

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English smart

Adjective

smart (neuter singular smart, definite singular and plural smarte, comparative smartere, indefinite superlative smartest, definite superlative smarteste)

  1. clever (mentally sharp or bright)
  2. smart

Derived terms

  • smartklokke
  • smarttelefon

References

  • “smart” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English smart

Adjective

smart (neuter singular smart, definite singular and plural smarte, comparative smartare, indefinite superlative smartast, definite superlative smartaste)

  1. clever (mentally sharp or bright)
  2. smart

Derived terms

  • smartklokke
  • smarttelefon

References

  • “smart” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Adjective

smart (invariable)

  1. smart (with smart technology)

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English smart.

Pronunciation

Adjective

smart (comparative smartare, superlative smartast)

  1. smart; clever

Declension

Anagrams

  • tarms, trams

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