hurt vs wound what difference

what is difference between hurt and wound

English

Etymology

From Middle English hurten, hirten, hertan (to injure, scathe, knock together), from Old Northern French hurter (“to ram into, strike, collide with”; > Modern French heurter), perhaps from Frankish *hūrt (a battering ram), from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną (to fall, beat), from Proto-Indo-European *krew- (to fall, beat, smash, strike, break); however, the earliest instances of the verb in Middle English are as old as those found in Old French, which leads to the possibility that the Middle English word may instead be a reflex of an unrecorded Old English *hȳrtan, which later merged with the Old French verb. Germanic cognates include Dutch horten (to push against, strike), Middle Low German hurten (to run at, collide with), Middle High German hurten (to push, bump, attack, storm, invade), Old Norse hrútr (battering ram).

Alternate etymology traces Old Northern French hurter rather to Old Norse hrútr (ram (male sheep)), lengthened-grade variant of hjǫrtr (stag), from Proto-Germanic *herutuz, *herutaz (hart, male deer), which would relate it to English hart (male deer). See hart.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hû(r)t, IPA(key): /hɜːt/
  • (General American) enPR: hûrt, IPA(key): /hɝt/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)t

Verb

hurt (third-person singular simple present hurts, present participle hurting, simple past and past participle hurt)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To cause (a person or animal) physical pain and/or injury.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To cause (somebody) emotional pain.
    He was deeply hurt he hadn’t been invited.
    The insult hurt.
  3. (intransitive) To be painful.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To damage, harm, impair, undermine, impede.
    Copying and pasting identical portions of source code hurts maintainability, because the programmer has to keep all those copies synchronized.
    Every little hurts.

Synonyms

  • (to be painful): smart
  • (to cause physical pain and/or injury): wound, injure, dere

Derived terms

  • hurtle
  • wouldn’t hurt a fly

Translations

See also

  • ache

Adjective

hurt (comparative more hurt, superlative most hurt)

  1. Wounded, physically injured.
  2. Pained.

Synonyms

  • (wounded): imbrued, injured, wounded; see also Thesaurus:wounded
  • (pained): aching, sore, suffering

Translations

Noun

hurt (plural hurts)

  1. An emotional or psychological humiliation or bad experience.
  2. (archaic) A bodily injury causing pain; a wound or bruise.
    • 1605, Shakespeare, King Lear vii
      I have received a hurt.
    • The cause is a temperate conglutination ; for both bodies are clammy and viscous , and do bridle the deflux of humours to the hurts , without penning them in too much
    • The pains of sickness and hurts [] all men feel.
  3. (archaic) injury; damage; detriment; harm
  4. (heraldry) A roundel azure (blue circular spot).
  5. (engineering) A band on a trip-hammer helve, bearing the trunnions.
  6. A husk.

Translations

Related terms

  • hurty

References

Anagrams

  • Ruth, Thur, ruth, thru, thur

German

Verb

hurt

  1. inflection of huren:
    1. third-person singular present
    2. second-person plural present
    3. plural imperative

Polish

Etymology

From Middle High German hurt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xurt/

Noun

hurt m inan

  1. wholesale

Declension

Derived terms

  • (adjective) hurtowy
  • (nouns) hurtownia, hurtownik

Further reading

  • hurt in Polish dictionaries at PWN


English

Etymology 1

Noun from Middle English wund, from Old English wund, from Proto-Germanic *wundō. Verb from Middle English wunden, from Old English wundian, from Proto-Germanic *wundōną.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: wo͞ond, IPA(key): /wuːnd/
    • (MLE) IPA(key): /wyːnd/
  • (US) enPR: wo͞ond, IPA(key): /wund/
  • (obsolete) enPR: wound, IPA(key): /waʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -uːnd

Noun

wound (plural wounds)

  1. An injury, such as a cut, stab, or tear, to a (usually external) part of the body.
    • 2013, Phil McNulty, “Liverpool 1-0 Man Utd”, BBC Sport, 1 September 2013:
      The visitors were without Wayne Rooney after he suffered a head wound in training, which also keeps him out of England’s World Cup qualifiers against Moldova and Ukraine.
    • 1595 Shakespeare, “Wales. Before Flint castle”, King Richard the Second.
      Showers of blood / Rained from the wounds of slaughtered Englishmen.
    • 1883: Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      I went below, and did what I could for my wound; it pained me a good deal, and still bled freely; but it was neither deep nor dangerous, nor did it greatly gall me when I used my arm.
  2. (figuratively) A hurt to a person’s feelings, reputation, prospects, etc.
    It took a long time to get over the wound of that insult.
  3. (criminal law) An injury to a person by which the skin is divided or its continuity broken.
Synonyms
  • (injury): injury, lesion
  • (something that offends a person’s feelings): slight, slur, insult
  • See also Thesaurus:injury
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

wound (third-person singular simple present wounds, present participle wounding, simple past and past participle wounded)

  1. (transitive) To hurt or injure (someone) by cutting, piercing, or tearing the skin.
  2. (transitive) To hurt (a person’s feelings).
Usage notes
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb wound had the form woundest, and had woundedst for its past tense.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form woundeth was used.
Synonyms
  • (injure): See Thesaurus:harm
  • (hurt (feelings)): See Thesaurus:offend
Translations

Etymology 2

See wind (Etymology 2)

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /waʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Verb

wound

  1. simple past tense and past participle of wind

Derived terms

  • drum-wound
  • series-wound

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