hustle vs sting what difference

what is difference between hustle and sting

English

Etymology

From Dutch husselen or by metathesis from Dutch hutselen (to shake up), a frequentative of hutsen (to stir, to move something (back and forth)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhʌsəl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌsəl

Verb

hustle (third-person singular simple present hustles, present participle hustling, simple past and past participle hustled)

  1. To push someone roughly, to crowd, to jostle.
  2. (intransitive) To rush or hurry.
  3. (transitive) To bundle; to stow something quickly.
  4. (transitive) To con or deceive; especially financially.
  5. To play deliberately badly at a game or sport in an attempt to encourage players to challenge.
  6. (informal) To obtain by illicit or forceful action.
  7. (informal) To sell sex; to work as a pimp.
  8. (informal) To be a prostitute, to exchange use of one’s body for sexual purposes for money.
  9. To dance the hustle, a disco dance.
  10. (informal) To work.
  11. (informal) To put a lot of effort into one’s work.

Synonyms

  • (to rush): fly, make tracks; see also Thesaurus:rush
  • (to deceive): defraud, swindle; see also Thesaurus:deceive
  • (to be a prostitute): sell one’s body, turn tricks; see also Thesaurus:prostitute oneself
  • (to work as a pimp): pimp; see also Thesaurus:pimp out
  • (to work): labor

Descendants

  • Dutch: hosselen

Translations

Noun

hustle (countable and uncountable, plural hustles)

  1. A state of busy activity.
  2. A propensity to work hard and get things done; ability to hustle.
  3. (preceded by definite article) A type of disco dance, commonly danced to the Van McCoy song The Hustle.
  4. (prison slang) An activity, such as prostitution or reselling stolen items, that a prisoner uses to earn money in prison.

Derived terms

  • hustle and bustle
  • hustler
  • hustly
  • on the hustle

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Hulets, Lesuth, Lueths, sleuth


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ

Etymology 1

From Middle English stynge, sting, stenge, from Old English sting, stinċġ (a sting, stab, thrust made with a pointed instrument; the wound made by a stab or sting), from Proto-Germanic *stangiz.

Noun

sting (plural stings)

  1. A bump left on the skin after having been stung.
  2. A puncture made by an insect or arachnid in an attack, usually including the injection of venom.
  3. A pointed portion of an insect or arachnid used for attack.
    Synonym: stinger
  4. A sharp, localised pain primarily on the epidermis
  5. (botany) A sharp-pointed hollow hair seated on a gland which secretes an acrid fluid, as in nettles.
  6. The thrust of a sting into the flesh; the act of stinging; a wound inflicted by stinging.
  7. (law enforcement) A police operation in which the police pretend to be criminals in order to catch a criminal.
  8. A short percussive phrase played by a drummer to accent the punchline in a comedy show.
  9. A brief sequence of music used in films, TV, and video games as a form of scenic punctuation or to identify the broadcasting station.
  10. A support for a wind tunnel model which extends parallel to the air flow.
  11. (figuratively) The harmful or painful part of something.
  12. A goad; incitement.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, A Lover’s Complaint
  13. The concluding point of an epigram or other sarcastic saying.
Synonyms
  • (pointed portion of an insect or arachnid): stinger
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English stingen, from Old English stingan, from Proto-Germanic *stinganą. Compare Swedish and Icelandic stinga.

Verb

sting (third-person singular simple present stings, present participle stinging, simple past and past participle stung or (rare, dialectal) stang)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To hurt, usually by introducing poison or a sharp point, or both.
  2. (transitive, of an insect or arachnid) To puncture with the stinger.
  3. (intransitive, sometimes figurative) To hurt, to be in pain (physically or emotionally).
  4. (figuratively) To cause harm or pain to.
Derived terms
Translations

Anagrams

  • GTINs, Tings, gnits, tings

Middle English

Noun

sting

  1. Alternative form of stynge

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From the verb stinge

Noun

sting n (definite singular stinget, indefinite plural sting, definite plural stinga or stingene)

  1. a stitch (in sewing and surgery)
  2. stitch (pain in the side)

References

  • “sting” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From the verb stinge

Noun

sting m (definite singular stingen, indefinite plural stingar or stinger, definite plural stingane or stingene)

  1. stitch (pain in the side)

sting n (definite singular stinget, indefinite plural sting, definite plural stinga)

  1. a stitch (in sewing and surgery)

References

  • “sting” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *stangiz; akin to stingan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stinɡ/, [stiŋɡ]

Noun

sting m

  1. sting, stinging (of an animal)

Descendants

  • Middle English: stynge, stenge, sting, steng
    • English: sting
    • Scots: sting

Romanian

Verb

sting

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stinge
  2. first-person singular present subjunctive of stinge
  3. third-person plural present indicative of stinge

Swedish

Pronunciation

Verb

sting

  1. imperative of stinga.

Anagrams

  • tings

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse stinga, from Proto-Germanic *stinganą. Compare Icelandic, Faroese stinga, Swedish stinga, sticka, stånga, English sting.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²st(e)iŋː/
    Rhymes: -ìŋɡ

Verb

sting, stikk (present stikk, preterite stang or stakk, plural ståkk, supine ståkkä, past participle stongän or ståkkä)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To sting, stab, gore.

Derived terms

  • naut-stongän, naut-ståkkä
  • mark-stongen

Related terms

  • stang
  • stöing

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