Injustice vs Justice what difference

what is difference between Injustice and Justice

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French injustice, from Latin iniustitia. Equivalent to in- +‎ justice.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪnˈdʒʌs.tɪs/

Noun

injustice (countable and uncountable, plural injustices)

  1. Absence of justice; unjustice.
  2. Violation of the rights of another person or people.
  3. Unfairness; the state of not being fair or just.

Usage notes

  • Injustice and unjust use different prefixes, as French injustice was borrowed into English, while unjust was formed as un- + just. The spelling injust, from French injuste, is very rarely used, and unjustice, from un- + justice, is nonstandard.

Synonyms

  • justicelessness
  • unjustice (nonstandard)
  • wrong
  • wrength

Related terms

  • just
  • justice
  • unjust
  • injust, injustly (rare)

Translations


French

Etymology

From Old French, borrowed from Latin iniūstitia, injūstitia, from iniustus (unjust).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.ʒys.tis/

Noun

injustice f (plural injustices)

  1. injustice

Related terms

  • justice
  • injuste

Further reading

  • “injustice” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Verb

injustice

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of injustiçar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of injustiçar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of injustiçar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of injustiçar


English

Etymology

From Middle English justice, from Old French justise, justice (Modern French justice), from Latin iūstitia (righteousness, equity), from iūstus (just), from iūs (right), from Proto-Italic *jowos, perhaps literally “sacred formula”, a word peculiar to Latin (not general Italic) that originated in the religious cults, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yew-. Doublet of Justitia.

Displaced native Middle English rightwished, rightwisnes (justice) (from Old English rihtwīsnes (justice, righteousness), compare Old English ġerihte (justice)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈdʒʌstɪs/
  • Hyphenation: jus‧tice

Noun

justice (countable and uncountable, plural justices)

  1. The state or characteristic of being just or fair.
  2. The ideal of fairness, impartiality, etc., especially with regard to the punishment of wrongdoing.
  3. Judgment and punishment of a party who has allegedly wronged another.
  4. The civil power dealing with law.
  5. A title given to judges of certain courts; capitalized when placed before a name.
  6. Correctness, conforming to reality or rules.

Synonyms

  • (judge of various lower courts): See judge
  • (judge of a superior court): justiciar, justiciary

Antonyms

  • injustice

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • fairness

Further reading

  • justice on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Etymology

From Old French justise, justice, borrowed from Latin iūstitia, jūstitia. Doublet of justesse.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒys.tis/

Noun

justice f (plural justices)

  1. justice

Derived terms

Related terms

  • juste

References

  • “justice” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Further reading

  • “justice” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Norman

Etymology

From Old French justise, justice, borrowed from Latin iūstitia, jūstitia (righteousness, equity), from iūstus (just), from iūs (right), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yew-.

Noun

justice f (plural justices)

  1. (Jersey) justice

Old French

Noun

justice f (oblique plural justices, nominative singular justice, nominative plural justices)

  1. Alternative form of justise

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